ShopRite Pre-tournament notes and interviews

ShopRite LPGA Classic
Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club, Bay Course
Galloway, New Jersey
Pre-tournament notes and interviews
May 31, 2012

Yani Tseng, Rolex Rankings No. 1
Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 7
Cristie Kerr, Rolex Rankings No. 5


The LPGA Tour heads back to the Garden State for the ShopRite LPGA Classic in Galloway, New Jersey where action will unfold on the famed Bay Course at Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club. This week’s field will feature 144 players competing for a $1.5 million purse with $225,000 to the winner.

Rolex Rankings No. 12 Brittany Lincicome returns to Galloway to defend her title after posting a 5-under-par 66 on Sunday to defeat then- Rolex Rankings No. 3 Jiyai Shin and No. 4 Cristie Kerr. This week’s event also features 21 of the top-25 players in the Rolex Women’s World Golf Rankings. This includes every winner from each event so far in the 2012 season: No. 1 Yani Tseng, No. 4 Ai Miyzatao, No. 7 Stacy Lewis, No. 14 Sun Young Yoo, No. 15 Angela Stanford, No. 79 Jessica Korda, No. 81 Pornanong Phatlum and No. 20 Azahara Munoz, who is coming off her first career victory two weeks ago at the Sybase Match Play Championship in Gladstone, New Jersey.

Hard work never stops…Yani Tseng has held the No. 1 spot in the Rolex Women’s World Golf Rankings for 68 straight weeks, but it doesn’t mean the top-ranked LPGA Tour player is willing to slack off in her game.

After delivering what she called a “disappointing” performance at the Sybase Match Play Championship two weeks ago when she lost in the third round to fellow Taiwan native Candie Kung, Tseng put her focus on sharpening her game.  

“I came back home to see my coach [Gary Gilchrist] the next day and didn't give me any day off and just kind of practiced every day to get a rhythm back,” Tseng said. “But I feel good.  I'm enjoying to practice and I'm enjoying to do the things that I like, so I don't feel I was very tired.  So it was exciting to have a tournament like this week and to see how good I can be this week.”

Tseng said that she cried and was very upset following her loss at the Sybase Match Play. Tseng was asked during her press conference if she remembers the last time she was that upset with her performance in an event.

“It’s been a long time I've even felt that way that I'm disappointed that much,” said Tseng, who has recorded a top-10 finish in all eight of her LPGA events this season. “Because most of the time maybe I didn't play well, but I feel like my game is still there -- I feel like I can do better.

“I don't know that I could do better than that.  I feel I was very lucky to still be in the third round.  It doesn't feel like my game is there.  Just like everything is kind of -- it's just not listen to my mind, like the way I want to do it.  It was just not listening, so I was very disappointed, and I really couldn't remember what was the last time I had that feeling.  It must be a long time, because last couple years I've been playing pretty good. I'm fine about that tournament.  I'm okay.  But I was just disappointed with the game I played.”

Role Model: No one likes telling the same story over and over again. But Stacy Lewis has found a way of embracing the opportunity of inspiring young people when they hear about her overcoming the challenge of having scoliosis and wearing a back-brace for much of her childhood.

“It definitely gets tiring telling the same story over and over again,” said Lewis.  “I'm not going to lie, but it's really cool that every year I can go to the same tour stop and find another kid that hasn't heard my story before that really inspired them.”

Lewis has also gone through the transition of becoming a role model, for both golfers and non-golfers alike. The No. 7 player in the world has come to the realization that others, especially a young crowd, get a star-struck feeling when they get to meet the two-time LPGA Tour winner and major champion.

“I went to the Women's NCAA Championship a couple weeks ago, and all these college girls they were so nervous to meet me, and I was like ‘I was just here three years ago,’” said Lewis. “I was like ‘you shouldn't be that nervous to meet me. “But it's really cool that even kids in college are looking up to me and looking at what I'm doing and I inspire them.”

Finding new ways to give back…Cristie Kerr continued delivering positive announcements of her work outside the ropes today when she received a $5,000 check from ShopRite and Coca-Cola for her Birdies for Breast Cancer charity. The donation will help fund the Cristie Kerr Women’s Health Center located in New Jersey. Kerr spoke about her partnership with both companies which has produced a platform for her to promote living a healthy lifestyle.

“Through ShopRite's LiveRight program we've developed a campaign where you will see pop-up ads in the stores, pop-up me actually, cardboard cutouts of me,” said Kerr. “There are different fitness tips and recipes, and you know, kind of little secrets of what I do to stay healthy and hydrated and happy.”

The top-ranked American in the Rolex Rankings referred to her own weight loss as an inspiration to try to help others do the same.

“I was pretty heavy when I was younger and decided to really dive in and change my lifestyle to become healthy,” said Kerr. “Through the end of my high school career and the first couple of years on tour I really struggled with my weight and decided to really change my eating habits and my exercise.  Over the next two and a half years I lost over 70 pounds.”

Through the avenue of living healthier, Kerr is also supporting a cause close to her heart: the fight against breast cancer. Her mom was diagnosed with breast cancer and affected Kerr like the millions of Americans with family members who are afflicted with the disease.

“With my mom getting diagnosed with breast cancer really changed my life,” said Kerr. “And it's kind of put me on like a lifelong quest to do everything I can to try and beat this disease for not only myself, my family, but for other people.  And the health center's only been open for just under two years, and we're going to have treated 10,000 women this year, basically a thousand women each month now.”

With the center’s growth, Kerr is excited to see the money going toward improving the services of facility.

“It's great to know where your money is going,” said Kerr. “Anybody that wants to go visit our center can go and take a walk through, see what we're doing; and funds that are raised. ShopRite's helping us to raise funds, they go to buy new equipment that's for diagnostic and testing.”

Honoring Joy…The LPGA Tour was saddened by the news last week that Ladies European Tour member Melissa Reid’s mother, Joy, was killed in a car accident in Germany. Both of Reid’s parents were in Germany to be with her while she was playing in the LET’s UniCredit Ladies German Open. In her honor, LPGA Tour players, caddies and staff will wear a purple ‘Joy’ patch the next couple weeks. Reid, who was a member of the victorious European Solheim Cup team last fall, is scheduled to play in the U.S. Women’s Open in July. 

Tweet of the Day: “Saw one of my favorite mascots today :-). The Philly Phanatic. Love that costume!!! “ -- @Brittany1golf.

Of Note…Spaniards Azahara Munoz and Belen Mozo will pull double duty on Saturday at the ShopRite LPGA Classic. The duo will leave the golf clubs behind after the second round in favor of jobs with Golf Channel. Munoz will try her hand at producing while Mozo will sit in the director’s chair for the telecast. Tune into second-round coverage of the ShopRite LPGA Classic on Saturday from 2:30-6:00 p.m. Eastern…There was a special guest on hand at the Stockton Seaview Hotel and Golf Club on Thursday when the Phillie Phanatic made an appearance. The Phillie Phanatic took photos with many of the LPGA players and even showed off some of his putting skills on the green.

 

 

Yani Tseng, Rolex Rankings No. 1

THE MODERATOR:  All right.  We'd like to welcome Rolex Rankings' No. 1 Yani Tseng into the interview room.  Great to have you here again.  A little different format this week from the last tournament you were in, Match Play.  Any difference for you guys when you come off an event like that and entering a Match Play format and come back to playing in stroke play?
YANI TSENG:  Not really.  Actually from playing stroke play and Match Play, and it's good.  But I'm happy to be back with a three-day tournament and always very happy to be back here, and I feel pretty good right now, much better than last week because I was a little tired the last week.  I was working with my coach a little bit and then did some putting and short game and did lots of work on my swing and my club distance and it helps a lot.  So this week I feel very confident and I feel ready to go.

THE MODERATOR:  I heard you were working quite a bit on your game last week.  Were you a little disappointed at all at how you played at Sybase and was that kind of the catalyst of putting in a little extra work?
YANI TSENG:  Yeah.  I was very disappointed.  I was crying and just very disappointed how much I did on Sybase and didn't play well.  I just didn't -- I gave 100 percent effort, but it just didn't come out as good as I wanted.  I mean not even close.

So really disappointed.  So I came back home to see my coach the next day and didn't give me any day off and just kind of practiced every day to get a rhythm back.  But I feel good.  I'm enjoying to practice and I'm enjoying to do the things that I like, so I don't feel I was very tired.  So it was exciting to have a tournament like this week and to see how good I can be this week.

THE MODERATOR:  It's funny to hear you say how disappointed you were in your game and how hard you worked, but yet every event you've played in so far this year you've finished in the Top 10.
YANI TSENG:  Yeah.  In Match Play I was -- it's funny, I was like, oh, I just missed the Top 10 because I didn't know if you make two matches you're in Top 10.  I was like, oh, I missed it because I make every Top 10, so I was like, oh, I just missed that.  And after I go back to look at the scoreboard I was like, wow, I'm number nine.  So I was like, that's pretty good.  That makes me a little happier.

THE MODERATOR:  In addition to all the success you've had on the golf course already this year with three victories and eight Top 10 finishes, you've had a fun year off the course as well in terms of getting some recognition when you were in New York and you got to go on Charlie Rose, and then you were recognized by Time Magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world.  What has that been like for you to start to get that recognition after the year that you had last year?
YANI TSENG:  It's really a big honor to have those awards, more people know who I am in the States, and I mean I love this place.  I feel like this is just my second home, and I'm very happy to see more fans come out and support us, to watch us on the course and more people recognize me when I'm walking down the street, when I go to the airport.

It's so much -- like I feel very warm to have that support because I know I'm from Taiwan, and the people probably don't know you, but now I have more people notice who you are and get more recognition and attention that I'm Yani Tseng, I play on the LPGA.  It's humbling to have that and just really happy.

Q.  What was that gala like?  I know there was a lot of famous people there and I know you got to meet one of your idols in Jeremy Linn and get to talk to him.  What was that experience like?
YANI TSENG:  He's really a nice guy.  We're kind of the same age.  He was born in America, but his family is from Taiwan.  So it was really nice to see Asian like playing in the NBA.  That's huge for Asian.  It's like Se Ri Pak in ladies golf.  He make everybody to believe that everybody can do it, to play in the NBA.

Q.  I was wondering with the recognition and the celebrity, so to speak, does that also increase the pressure that you have on yourself?  You're pretty much the favorite in every tournament you play now.  Does that add a little bit?
YANI TSENG:  The pressure is there, but I try to turn the pressure into motivation, and I think that it's a good pressure.  It's not a negative pressure.  So I kind of really enjoy it because a couple of years ago people always asking me, oh, you play so well, but you didn't get as much recognition like the PGA guys, but now I'm getting much better and people know who I am, but it is fun.  I don't care.  I'm very happy to have those people like to support.

Q.  We've seen Annika go through this and Lorena go through it.  How hard is it to be you and be the person that everybody's looking up to and trying to beat every week and kind of the face the tour?  Is that a lot of burden?
YANI TSENG:  No.  I just -- I didn't think that much.  I just try to be myself.  I wouldn't think about anything else because I feel I still have a long way to go.  I don't feel I'm like Annika or Lorena.  I think still a long way to get to their level.

But I'm working on it.  I wish I can be like them one day, and there's so many great players on the tour that you're kind of learning from each other and push each other to get better, and it was great to be on this tour and to keep learning, and then to meet more people.  So I really enjoy it.  I wasn't feeling that much pressure.

Q.  Does this golf course set up well for your game, do you think?  I know this tour has a lot of long hitters.  This doesn't necessarily favor them because it's kind of a shorter course.  Does this play to your strengths?
YANI TSENG:  I don't know.  The course is very tough.  It's up and down, and I think when it gets very windy and I think the long hitter kind of comes out better because you can hit the ball lower, you get a better ball striker, it's very good for the wind.

Q.  You mentioned some of the work you did following the Match Play.  Was there anything major you did with your coach or was it just little things here and there and just kind of getting back to basics?
YANI TSENG:  Kind of just little things.  I didn't trust myself enough to play well, so I kind of worry about too much, worry about missing putts and hitting good drives and something like that.  So just kind of get it back a little bit, let myself trust more, and I think the club distance is one of the biggest things because beginning of this year my distance goes a little longer, so I'm still trying to figure how much longer it goes and between the gap.

So last week we practiced a lot on the distance, so I was practicing from like 30 yards to 150 yards, like every five yards I practiced to make sure those clubs is in a good position to hit a good distance.  So it helped a lot, so this gives me a lot of confidence that by holding this club, I trust this is going to go this distance.

Q.  You said after Sybase you were very upset and like you even cried.  Do you remember like the last time you felt that way about your game and then sort of how did you come back and respond?
YANI TSENG:  Yeah, that was -- I wouldn't -- it was quite a long time.  A long time I've even felt that way that I'm disappointed that much, because most of the time maybe I didn't play well, but I feel like my game is still there.  I feel like I can do better.

But that week I don't know that I could do better than that.  I feel I was very lucky to still be in the third round.  Doesn't feel like my game is there.  Just like everything is kind of -- it's just not listen to my mind, like the way I want to do it.  It was just not listening, so I was very disappointed, and I really couldn't remember what was the last time I had that feeling.  It must be a long time, because last couple years I've been playing pretty good, and the best shot, everything, it's okay.  I'm fine about that tournament.  I'm okay.  But I was just disappointed with the game I played.

 

Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 7

THE MODERATOR:  All right.  We'd like to welcome Stacy Lewis into the interview room.  Thanks for joining us today.  It's been a pretty great season for you starting off this year, one victory already at the Mobile Bay LPGA Classic.  Can you just take me through the start of this year for you?  I know you said for a while you weren't feeling great about your game, so how are you feeling right now heading into this week?
STACY LEWIS:  I'd say this week I'm feeling pretty good.  I came off the win and I played well at the Match Play, just lost my final match.  But I started off the year really well.  Lost in a playoff at the Australian Open and kind of went through a little rough there, kind of lost my swing a little bit and found it again in Mobile, so it's kind of been a little up and down for me, but I feel really good about it and I feel like it's in a good spot.

THE MODERATOR:  I was asking Yani this question, too, but how difficult is it to go from a Match Play event back to stroke play?  I mean you guys play a lot of stroke play, I know that, but is it a different feeling at all?  Do you feel like you have to adjust back?
STACY LEWIS:  I think Match Play for me is a lot more stressful.  I feel like you get so kind of tense over every shot because that one shot you could be done after that.  And so I think coming back to stroke play is actually a lot easier.  You're a little more relaxed and kind of can free it up a little bit and swing a little bit easier.

THE MODERATOR:  You guys are going into a stretch, too, of big events coming up after this week, next week the second major of the year and then the U.S. Women's Open is coming up not long after that.  What do you do with your game as you kind of prepare for this stretch of the summer where you have these events and is there anything differently that you do in the weeks leading up to the majors?
STACY LEWIS:  I think throughout the year I've been kind of getting ready for these next six weeks, five and a half.  I've been getting ready for these five weeks because these are the most important weeks I think for us all year.

So everything I was working on in Mobile to Sybase to everything up to that point has just been getting ready for these weeks, so I feel my game is in a good spot and now it's just going out playing and just little tweaks here and there, but nothing major.

THE MODERATOR:  And overall how does this golf course suit your game?
STACY LEWIS:  I haven't been very successful on this golf course.  Hopefully it'll be better this year.  I haven't quite figured out the greens.  The greens are really tough.  You get some bad bounces.

Last year they were pretty firm and not quite reacting very well, but this year it's a little softer, so I think that should help me.  Other than that I'm playing well, so hopefully that'll kind of change the tide a little bit.

Q.  Stacy, I know that you probably get asked this a lot, but do you ever get tired of telling your story?  You know, I mean it's been written so much.  It's probably going to be written a lot more, but it seems like such an inspirational thing.  What is that like when you go to every stop and people want to know about that and how you got to be who you are?
STACY LEWIS:  It definitely gets tiring telling the same story over and over again.  I'm not going to lie, but it's really cool that every year I can go to the same tour stop and find another kid that hasn't heard my story before that really inspired them.  For me it gets a little monotonous and I don't like telling it all the time, but if I tell it one more time and one more person gets inspired by that, then I'll tell it every time.  It's definitely made me who I am and I've learned that I need to embrace it a little more.

Q.  You talk about role models.  How do you feel about being obviously a role model for an awful lot of people who are going through the same thing as you and probably maybe help them getting through it through reading about you or learning about you?
STACY LEWIS:  It's definitely a little strange to me because everything I went through, I just felt like it was something that I had to go through.  I didn't really have a choice, and so I just dealt with it and I did it.

I didn't have an option with it, and so now it just seems kind of strange that I'm a role model for all these people just by doing what I had to do.  And it was pretty weird for me, I went to the Women's NCAA Championship a couple weeks ago, and all these college girls they were so nervous to meet me, and I was like I was just here three years ago.  I was like you shouldn't be that nervous to meet me, but it's really cool that even kids in college are looking up to me and looking at what I'm doing and I inspire them.

Q.  Why were they nervous?
STACY LEWIS:  I don't know.  I don't think I'm that nervous of a person to talk to.  I don't know.  I guess they'd just seen me on TV and hadn't met me before.  I don't know.  It's pretty cool, but it's also kind of strange.

Q.  You talk about embracing it maybe more, but it must make you feel pretty good, though, to know that you are, whether it gets monotonous or whatever.  It must make you feel pretty good because I know charity work is a big part of the golf.  But that's sort of a contribution you're making.
STACY LEWIS:  Absolutely.  I do all kinds of charity work.  I love helping people, so anything I can do to help someone, I'm all for it.  And I do get a lot of letters from kids and everything, it just seems when I'm upset, I might have a bad round or something and I check my email and I've got an email from an eight-year-old girl somewhere that's inspired by my story.  It kind of makes me think twice about, okay, my round wasn't really that bad today and doesn't really matter in the whole big scheme of things.  So it puts perspective on what I do.

Q.  Do you have to approach a 54-hole event any differently than a 72?  I would think there's probably not as much room for error.
STACY LEWIS:  Right.

Q.  Do you have to change your strategy at all?
STACY LEWIS:  I don't think you really have to change your strategy.  You just have to get off to a good start.  I think that's key.  Especially a golf course like this.  I think 11-under won last year.  15, 16-under won in years past.  So you gotta get off to a quick start, and there's really not as much room for error because you don't have as much time to make it up.  So it's kind of a fast deal.  We wait all week for the tournament and then it finally gets here and it's over like that.

Q.  You touched on it a little bit with saying how the other college golfers were nervous to meet you.  With the success you've had recently, with the major and another win this year, do you see that a lot, there's a different vibe that people have around you, when they meet you or they're following you around the course?
STACY LEWIS:  I've seen that people are definitely starting to know who I am more.  I can hear people saying, oh, there's Stacy Lewis and things like that, but it's still pretty strange to me because I'm just out there playing golf.  I'm still the same person.  I haven't really changed.

I don't know.  It really, it just shocked me when I went to the NCAA tournament and all the girls were so nervous to meet me.  Of course, (inaudible) giving them a hard time because I hang out and play golf with them all the time.

I don't know.  It's still strange, but it's cool that they're looking up to me and want to be out here on tour.  They're asking me questions.  They want to learn from me.  They want to know what I did here or there, and it's pretty cool.

THE MODERATOR:  You've seemed to get more comfortable in this role, too, since Kraft and winning.  Do you feel more comfortable when you're now asked to do more media and get in these situations where you have people come up to you as a role model?
STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, I think I've had to get more comfortable.  I've kind of been forced into the role.  And I've learned to embrace my story, and I'm okay telling it and learning that people, they want to know what you're doing.  They want to hear stories, what little things are you working on here and there.  So I've tried to embrace it more and hopefully it comes off that I'm more comfortable.

Q.  Stacy, you were on the '98 Curtis Cup team with Meghan Bolger, now Meghan Stasi.  Did you see her this week and what are your impressions on her?
STACY LEWIS:  I haven't seen her this week.  I saw her dad.  She was so much fun to have on the team, and she played really well there.  She's a great amateur player, and to stay amateur all these years and to represent us at the Curtis Cup for me it was an ultimate thing.  I'm sure it was for her.  But she's a great player and she gets to come home and play this week, so it'll be a lot of fun for her.

 

Cristie Kerr, Rolex Rankings No. 5

THE MODERATOR:  We'd like to welcome back Cristie Kerr into the interview room.  As we were talking about yesterday, Cristie has a lot of exciting things going on off the golf course, different initiatives.  And we have her here today to talk about one that she's got going on with ShopRite and Coca-Cola and community partners.  So I'm going to pass it over to Cristie and let her talk a little bit about what's happening today and the check presentation that just took place.
CRISTIE KERR:  Yeah.  I just want to say thank you to ShopRite and obviously Coca-Cola and Glaceau.  They're my sponsor.  And through ShopRite's LiveRight program we've developed a campaign where you will see pop-up ads in the stores, pop-up me actually, cardboard cutouts of me, and different fitness tips and recipes, and you know, kind of little secrets of what I do to stay healthy and hydrated and happy.

And you know, we've partnered with ShopRite on their LiveRight program, and they've donated a portion of every Vitamin Water or Smartwater or Powerade Zero that is purchased, and they've raised $5,000 for the Cristie Kerr Women's Health Center, so thank you to ShopRite, and it's a pretty exciting program.  And ShopRite's been a long-time sponsor of the LPGA, and it's great to be able to kind of coincide on this great project.

THE MODERATOR:  Can you talk a little bit about what it means to have Cristie as a partner and to kind of get this message out?
DENNIS O'TOOLE:  Sure.  We all know Cristie has a lot of credibility in the health and wellness face, fitness and activities, and we partnered with our brands that fit perfectly with the healthy and fit lifestyle, Smartwater, Fuze, Powerade Zero and Vitamin Water Zero and as Cristie said, part of the proceeds in the display programs that we have in the ShopRites and that we advertise in the circular proceeds from those sales during the month of May went back as a donation to the Cristie Kerr Women's Health Center.

So we're happy that we can partner with Cristie and bring a program to ShopRite that fits very well with their LiveRight program, so it's a real win-win-win program for everybody.

THE MODERATOR:  And Cristie, can you say just a little bit about what it means for you to be a part of this?  We all talk about how important it is, the healthy lifestyle in your life and what you've done.  What does it mean for you to be associated with this and to help others learn about the healthy lifestyle?
CRISTIE KERR:  Well, it's tremendous for me.  Obviously it's been well documented that I was pretty heavy when I was younger, you know, I decided to really dive in and change my lifestyle to become healthy, and through the end of my high school career, if you can call it a career, through the first couple of years on tour I really struggled with my weight and decided to really change my eating habits and my exercise.  And you know, over the next two and a half years I lost over 70 pounds.

And it doesn't get any easier.  It definitely is a daily struggle, and I tweet about different healthy lifestyle things, and people can go on there and see that, but it's great for ShopRite to have integrated this program, you know, and roll it out during the ShopRite LPGA Classic because it's important for fans to be able to connect with players.

It's important for fans who shop in the supermarkets to go and be able to feel like they're a part of what we're doing, and you know, to get access to things that can benefit them and things that can make them healthier, whether it's recipe or training tips or fitness or health tips, whatever.

And you know, with ShopRite's strong base in New Jersey and the Cristie Kerr Women's Health Center being in New Jersey, it's great synergy.  We've treated over 10,000 women in the last 18 months.  So it just works.  It just works together.

THE MODERATOR:  It's a tremendous effort in the fact that you can use this partnership and benefit that health center which has been so tremendously successful.  If you can talk a little bit about what it's meant for you to see that from the starting point of the women's health center to now treating so many patients and what it's been a part of that effort.
CRISTIE KERR:  It's crazy.  I never thought I'd be in health care.  With my mom getting diagnosed with breast cancer really changed my life.  And it's kind of put me on like a lifelong quest to do everything I can to try and beat this disease for not only myself, my family, but for other people.  And the health center's only been open for just under two years, and we're going to have treated 10,000 women this year, basically a thousand women each month now, and our receptionists were two receptionists in kind of like a little closet area and now there are six people and now looking to expand.

So it's pretty crazy in the short period of time that we've grown so much, and it's things that we do like this with our sponsors that really get the message out and bring awareness and let the women know, and men do get breast cancer as well, but let people know that they can go to the Cristie Kerr Women's Health Center, whether they have money or insurance, they get treated or not.

DENNIS O'TOOLE:  I think everybody that shops in ShopRite knows that they pride themselves on being able to deliver value, and Coca-Cola we pride ourselves on being able to refresh people's lives.

Well, the nice things about this program is it really does both when it kind of culminated just this past May in some of the stores we had the Cristie Kerr Women's Health Center mobile testing unit in parking lots of some of the ShopRites where we actually delivered real-life value to consumers who maybe couldn't afford health insurance to get health screenings for free.  So I think that was really a good sign of a partnership working for everybody.         

CRISTIE KERR:  And my last comment is it's great to know where your money is going.  Anybody that wants to go visit our center can go and take a walk through, see what we're doing; and funds that are raised, like ShopRite's helping us to raise funds, they go to buy new equipment that's for diagnostic and testing, like the stereotactic biopsy machine which we're getting ready to purchase.  We rent it out twice a week now.

But those are the things that really save lives, and even things on a very small level add up over time, and it's great to be able to not only play for myself on the golf course, but for these different reasons.

DENNIS O'TOOLE:  And as Cristie had mentioned before, on the ShopRite LiveRight website we're going to be delivering health tips and healthy recipes of Cristie's to consumers.  So every month they can go and log on there and find great recipes and health tips, so it's just another way to deliver value.  And thank you and your trainer.

CRISTIE KERR:  And I also answer questions on Twitter.  People tell me their inspiring stories of weight loss and healthy living, and it's great to be able to interact with those fans and have a one-on-one kind of virtual reality conversation.  And they ask me, what do you do?  Is it hard every day?  Are you tempted to eat badly?  And to answer those questions makes you real.  We're not just professional golfers.  We're people.

Topics: News and Notes, Kerr, Cristie, Lewis, Stacy, Tseng, Yani, ShopRite LPGA Classic [+]

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