Kingsmill Championship Second Round Notes and Interviews

Kingsmill Championship
Kingsmill Resort, The River Course
Williamsburg, Va.
September 7, 2012
Second-Round Notes and Interviews

 
Jiyai Shin, -12, Rolex Rankings No. 13
Danielle Kang, -11, Rolex Rankings No. 193
Dewi Claire Schreefel, -10, Rolex Rankings No. 141
Stacy Lewis, -8, Rolex Rankings No. 2
Leta Lindley, +2, Rolex Rankings No. 252

 
Rolex Rankings No. 13 Jiyai Shin (@sjy1470) moved one step closer to getting herself back in the winner’s circle on Friday, shooting a 3-under 68 to capture the second-round lead at the Kingsmill Championship. Shin followed up her tournament-record 62 on Thursday with four birdies and one bogey in Friday’s round and moved to 12-under-par for the tournament. She leads LPGA Tour rookie Danielle Kang by one stroke after Kang shot the low round on Friday, a 7-under 64.

An 8-time winner on the LPGA Tour, Shin has gone nearly two years without a victory. Her last win came at the 2010 Mizuno Classic in Japan.

 
Working for the Weekend… A total of 72 players made the 36-hole cut, which fell at 1-under par (141).

Keeping an eye on the board: Before Shin teed off on Friday, there was already one low round posted by Dewi Claire Schreefel, who had taken the early clubhouse lead at 10-under-par after shooting her second straight 66. So was Shin aware of what was taking place on the leaderboard?

“I'm always watching the leaderboard because that's why I have to know that my position,” Shin said. “I keep change my plan each hole after I check the positions.  So, well, I saw a lot of players play good today, so I think it will be make the fun to competition next two days.”

Being at the top of the leaderboard is nothing new for Shin, who held the top spot in the Rolex Women’s World Golf Rankings for a period of time in 2010. But is leading over the first two rounds something that she enjoys or would she rather try to claw her way from behind?

For Shin, the answer seemed simple – keep herself up on top.

“Why not?” Shin said with a laugh. “I think all players same answer. I really like when I’m on the top, but it also can come with a pressure, a little bit of pressure.  But it's also other players saying they get the pressure, too, so I just keep focused on my game.”

Show Me the Money! Coming off of two consecutive missed cuts at the Safeway Classic Presented by Coca-Cola and CN Canadian Women’s Open, Danielle Kang (@daniellekang) knew it was time for a change. During the week long break between this week’s Kingsmill Championship and the CN Canadian Women’s Open, Kang worked extensively with her coach and brother to return to winning form.

“After the CN Canadian Women's Open, I thought kind of obviously I'm approaching shots a little differently than I used to when I was an amateur and me and my coach sat down and talked about what I could do better or what could be changed,” said Kang. “So I approach iron shots differently and I've been flagging a lot of shots and I've been practicing with my brother before I came out here and he taught me how to putt every day, telling me, you know, you've got to do it this way, so it's been working.”

The only downfall of working so hard was a request made by her brother, and that was to give him five percent of whatever she made this week.

“My brother says I owe him five percent of whatever I win this week,” said Shin. “So I told him, hey, if he can get me to shoot under par and go low, I'll give you 20 percent.”

Kang’s hard work paid off on Saturday as she followed up a first-round 4-under-par 62 with a second-round 7-under-par 64. Kang’s blistering 5-under-par 29 on the back-nine ties the lowest nine hole score shot this year.

29 (-5)  Jennifer Song ShopRite LPGA Classic, 2nd round par 34
30 (-5)  Sydnee Michaels Safeway Classic Presented by Coca-Cola, 1st round par 35
30 (-5)  So Yeon Ryu Safeway Classic Presented by Coca-Cola, 2nd round par 35

Looking to improve on a career-best tied for 14th finish at this year’s U.S. Women’s Open, Kang is no stranger to hoisting the trophy an elite golf tournament. Kang won the 2010 and 2011 U.S. Women’s Amateur Championships and became the first player in 15 years to successfully defend her title.

Breaking the Rules! Dewi Claire Schreefel (@dcschreefel) was one of 33 players forced to return to The River Course Friday morning to complete the first round of the Kingsmill Championship. Schreefel resumed her first round on the eighth green where an unfortunate rules infraction cost her two strokes.

Prior to hitting her putt, Schreefel marked her ball then began to read the putt until her ball suddenly began to roll. Schreefel assumed it was okay to move her ball back to the original location since she still had ball mark down but unfortunately, she should have played the ball where it lied.

“The group in front of us, we saw her, she was around my ‑‑ where I was and we saw her putt roll away,” said Schreefel. “So with that my caddie said, Just leave your mark, since we thought the rule was if you leave your mark, when you put your ball back and it starts rolling, you can put it back to where it is.  We ‑‑ I put my ball back but I left my mark, then started reading my putt and then it started rolling away.  So then I picked it up and put it back by my mark, but the rule said apparently when it rolls away, even if your ball was still marked, you've got to play from the new spot.”

Schreefel quickly brushed off the rules infraction and started her second round a short time after with a birdie on the par-4 first. She then went on to record an eagle for the second consecutive day at the par-5 seventh then notched two additional birdies on Nos. 15 and 17.

“Things like that just kind of fuel me up,” said Schreefel. “You know, it's a little bit upsetting in the moment and you're losing two shots while you're in the hunt to make a really good score.  It's unfortunate but we live and learn.”

Hard Work Pays Off… Putting proved to be the difference for Stacy Lewis (@Stacy_Lewis) in today’s second round of the Kingsmill Championship as she shot a 6-under-par 65 to move herself in contention for her fourth career LPGA Tour victory.

After 31 putts in yesterday’s first round, Lewis stayed on the practice putting green until dark at an attempt to become more comfortable with her stroke. The hard work paid off for Lewis who needed only 28 putts in today’s second round. 

“Yesterday, I wasn't comfortable on the greens yesterday,” said Lewis. “I don't know if it was ‑‑ my speed was off early I think partly because of the rain and all that, but I just didn't really hit many good putts yesterday.  Hit a ton of greens, had chances.  And then we worked a little bit last night, it was pretty much in the dark but we worked a little bit and I kind of figured something out and hit some ‑‑ I hit a lot of really good putts today.”

While Lewis is focused on a good finish this week, she has her sights set on being named this year’s Rolex Player of the Year. Lewis currently stands second on the money list behind Inbee Park but holds a 26 point lead in the Rolex Player of the Year Race over Yani Tseng.

“I'm kind of looking toward the end of the year to be Player of the Year,” said Lewis. “That's kind of the final thing.  Week in and week out it's just win tournaments and give myself chances to win.  For Player of the Year I just need top 10s every week, so just giving myself chances to win, which is kind of what I've been doing all year.  But I mean long term, get the No. 1 spot from Yani, but I think for November I would like to be Player of the Year.”

End of a special career…As Leta Lindley sat in the front of the media and shared stories from her LPGA career on Friday afternoon, the tears began to flow freely. After 18 seasons on the LPGA Tour, Lindley had just completed the last round of her career after finishing at 2-over-par and missing the cut by three shots.

And while she had prepped herself for this moment, the emotions of the day took over.

“I think I've had a mix of emotions, obviously very bittersweet, but knowing that it's the right time for me,” Lindley said. “Obviously I was very tearful coming up 18.  I've been out here for 18 years and I've grown up out here and this has been my family for so long and it's been a big chunk of my life, but I know that it's time but it doesn't make it any less sad.”

Lindley and her husband, Matt Plagmann, walked up the 18th holding hands.  Plagmann was Lindley’s caddie for nearly her entire career and it was an emotional moment as the two finished off what has been an impressive career out on Tour.

“I never would have made it out here for 18 years without him by my side,” Lindley said. “Not only is he an amazing caddie, but a wonderful husband, a cheerleader, psychologist, golf coach.  He's been everything to me and my victories have been his victories as well.  It's been so special that we could do it together.  Not many husband‑wife teams can work together and have the kind of relationship that we do and I'm most thankful for him.”

Lindley, 40, had decided earlier this year that the 2012 season would be her final one on Tour. Over her 18-year-career, she had enjoyed a steady career -- capturing one victory at the 2008 Corning Classic, tallying 33 top-10 finishes and earning more than $3 million. She and Matt have two children – son Cole, 8, and daughter Reese, 6—and she felt the time had come to spend more time at home with them. Although they frequently travel with their mom and dad on Tour, they were back at home for the start of school. Lindley has always said how important being a mom is to her and now she’ll get the opportunity to do that job full-time.

“Ultimately they're my legacy,” Lindley said. “They're the most important thing to me.  I mean, I chase a little white ball out here and it's been a tremendous ride…They grow up so fast and I can't believe that Cole is eight and Reese is six.  Before I know it, they're going to be out of the house and I just don't want to miss any more of that.  So it's time to create some different memories.”

Of Note… Two-time Kingsmill Championship winner Cristie Kerr shot rounds of 72-74 to miss her second LPGA Tour cut this season…Looking to notch her first victory since the 2010 U.S. Women’s Open Championship, Paula Creamer is two-strokes off the lead after rounds of 65-67…Brittany Lang, this week’s LPGA.com Player of the Week, rebounded back from a first-round 1-over-par 72 with a second-round 5-under-par 66.

Jiyai Shin, Rolex Rankings No. 13

MODERATOR: All right, I’d like to welcome Jiyai Shin into the interview room. You followed up a first-round 62 with another solid 3-under-par 68. Can you take me through the day, what worked well for you  out there?

JIYAI SHIN: I made the one bogey today but it’s OK. I made another four birdies. It was still a good feeling with my shot and putting. And I play in the afternoon so it make the greens a little bit slower, so I missed a few chance with my putting.  Well, I still feel good so I just look forward to the weekend.

 MODERATOR:  We touched on it a little bit yesterday, but it looks like you'll go into the weekend with a one‑stroke lead.  What would it mean to you to finally get inthe winner's circle again?

JIYAI SHIN:  Well, the meaning is really close to the time for the good times.  Well, I’m used to the competition, I’m used to the pressure and nervous, too, and also I really like that feeling.  So I can't wait for the play for the weekend.

MODERATOR:  We joked a little bit up here that it seems like I see you all the time in here now in the interview room.  Do you look forward to coming in here now?

JIYAI SHIN:  This really good, too.  The meaning is that I play good at the tournament, so I want to keep coming into here.

Q.  Were you watching the leaderboard at all?  I think maybe Schreefel posted her 10‑under right about the time you were teeing off.  Did you see that and did you keep that in mind, or do you just play and not worry about what else is going on?

JIYAI SHIN:  Well, I'm always watching the leaderboard because that's why I have to know that my position. I keep change my plan each hole after I check the positions.  So, well, I saw a lot of players play good today, so I think it will be make the fun to competition next two days.

MODERATOR:  Do you like being on top of the leaderboard?  I know some players like to kind of come from behind.  Do you like having that top spot?

JIYAI SHIN:  Why not?  I think all players same answer.  Well, yeah, always. I really like when I’m on the top, but it also can come with a pressure, a little bit of pressure.  But it's also other players saying they get the pressure, too, so I just keep focused in my game.

Danielle Kang, Rolex Rankings No. 193

MODERATOR:  I'd like to welcome Danielle Kang into the interview room.  Danielle, thanks for coming in today.  A great round is an understatement.  Can you just take me through the day, what went well for you?

DANIELLE KANG:  Today I just started off the day thinking just take it shot by shot; that's what I said to my mom this morning.  I've been approaching shots differently this whole week as me and my coach talked about before I came out here, and I just am trying to see what works, and my brother taught me how to putt so it's been working pretty well as far as I can see.

MODERATOR:  You had 26 putts today.

DANIELLE KANG:  Really?

MODERATOR:  Yeah.

DANIELLE KANG:  Awesome.  My brother says I owe him five percent of whatever I win this week.  So I told him, hey, if he can get me to shoot under par and go low, I'll give you 20 percent.

MODERATOR:  You missed two consecutive cuts coming into this week.  What has finally clicked for you?

DANIELLE KANG:  After the Canadian Women's Open, I thought kind of obviously I'm approaching shots a little differently than I used to when I was an amateur and me and my coach sat down and talked about what I could do better or what could be changed.  So I approach iron shots differently and I've been flagging a lot of shots and I've been practicing with my brother before I came out here and he taught me how to putt every day, telling me, you know, you've got to do it this way, so it's been working.

MODERATOR:  You went to the U.S. Women's Amateur Championship.  Do you think that will help you going into the next two days?

DANIELLE KANG:  I guess, yeah, it should help.  I'm just taking it day by day.  Today was an awesome round and I'm really glad I'm playing much better than before, and hopefully this, you know, keep this up, keep taking it shot by shot.

Q.  Were you just trying to ‑‑ there have been a lot of birdies out there.  Were you just trying to keep up with ‑‑ were you watching the board to see how the scores were going and see where you were fitting on the board?

DANIELLE KANG:  Yeah, I kind of ‑‑ well, I was looking at the board at one point, and at one point when I was three shots off the lead, I think, I was telling myself, hey, match play, forget about all the birdies you've made, just go shot by shot.  I made a birdie, I go, ha ha, 2‑down now.  So I was just having fun out there.

Q.  Given how well you've done at match play, do you often find yourself thinking that way going into match play mode?

DANIELLE KANG:  Yeah, I love match play but it's hard to get yourself into that mode because every shot does count in stroke play, so it's a different mindset.  Sometimes when I get into it I'm really comfortable, so I keep telling myself hey, just have fun.  Sometimes you forget that it's just ‑‑ you know, you're out here and you love it out here.  I can't (indiscernible) some of the stuff and I've noticed that after missing two cuts and I went back home and I just came back all refreshed.

Q.  Your only bogey in two days was at the par 5.  What happened there?

DANIELLE KANG:  I was really sad because my dad always, you know, goes, can't bogey on a par 5.  I actually made that bogey, but it was a legitimate bogey.  I don't know, I laid up and I did everything I could and just ended up making a bogey.  My par putt lipped out, so made an up and down.

Q.  So you three‑putted?

DANIELLE KANG:  No, no, I missed the third shot.  Hit just the front and rolled all the way back down.

Dewi Claire Schreefel, Rolex Rankings No. 141

MODERATOR:  All right.  I'd like to welcome Dewi Claire Schreefel into the interview room.  Dewi, thanks for coming in.  Great round today, another 5‑under par 66.  Can you just take me through the day and kind of what went well for you?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  For the last two days everything has been going pretty good.  Hitting a lot of fairways so I got the opportunity to shoot at the pins with the soft conditions, hitting the irons good and rolling the putts well.  I'm not even making all the chances that I have, but that's how it goes.  Rolling it well, so looking forward to the weekend.

MODERATOR:  Yeah, I think saying you hit the ball well is an understatement.  You only missed two greens within the past two days.  7 you seemed to like, you eagled it the past two days.  What do you like about that hole?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  I don't know.  I mean, I just played it well.  I'm hitting it up on the right side of the fairway and then letting my 3‑wood get to about 25 yards of the green, and then pitching is my strong point, so it works well for me, I guess.

MODERATOR:  This is your first time in Kingsmill.  What are your thoughts on the golf course, and have you had any chance to explore Williamsburg at all?  

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  No.  I think maybe this afternoon we'll go some history seeking.  Yeah, it's a great course, very traditional.  I like park, tree‑lined courses.  So no, it's nice.  Conditions are wet but still good.  I think it's good we play the ball up.  It's nice, I like it here.

MODERATOR:  It was a long day for you yesterday.  You had to come back out this morning to finish and you started out with a double on 8.  What happened there?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  I actually had a little hiccup with the rules, so made a par but it became a double.

MODERATOR:  All right.  I know it says in the player guide that your ideal day would include watching NCAA football.  You went to USC, you have quite a football team this year.  What are you thoughts on that, and did you get to watch them last week?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Actually I went to the game last week, got to go, had really good seats and enjoyed watching them.  Quite a blowout, but it's always nice to see them play and I think it's going to be a good season, so we're all excited.

MODERATOR:  Did you go a lot when you were in school?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Not too much.  I'm going to say maybe two games a season.  Especially if you don't have reserved seating, you go with all the students, you're all packed and you've got to be three hours ahead to get a normal seat.  So no, not too often, I thought it was easier to watch on TV.

Q.  Were you on the 8th green when play ended last night or did you start this morning on the 8th tee?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  No, we already had hit our drives and then they told us play was suspended so we could have finished the hole.  I was playing well so I wanted to hit into the green, didn't want to putt because the greens would be better this morning, so hit onto the green and then this morning we resumed putting.

Q.  Okay.  I know we just talked about this outside but just need some clarification.  When you marked the ball, did it immediately roll away at that point, or did you get up and walk around the putt to look at it and it moved or what?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  The group in front of us, we saw her, she was around my ‑‑ where I was and we saw her putt roll away.  So with that my caddie said, Just leave your mark, since we thought the rule was if you leave your mark, when you put your ball back and it starts rolling, you can put it back to where it is.  We ‑‑ I put my ball back but I left my mark, then started reading my putt and then it started rolling away.  So then I picked it up and put it back by my mark, but the rule said apparently when it rolls away, even if your ball was still marked, you've got to play from the new spot.

And I picked it up, finished out the hole, and then by 9 they came to us and said you played from the wrong spot, so two‑stroke penalty.

 Q.  So as far as you know, even if it had rolled closer to the hole, you could have played it at that point according to the rule?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yeah, yeah.

MODERATOR:  It didn't seem to affect you at all.  You came back with quite a good round.

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Things like that just kind of fuel me up.  You know, it's a little bit upsetting in the moment and you're losing two shots while you're in the hunt to make a really good score.  It's unfortunate but we live and learn.

Q.  You said you hit it close to the green on 7 both days.  Have you holed pitch shots from off the green both days?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yeah.

Q.  How long yesterday, and then right before you finished last night and then this morning?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yesterday I had 29 yards to the front, or my pace is 29 paces to the green plus six is 35.  This morning, 21 plus 20 is 41.  It was two totally different shots because yesterday I had played high, this morning I could play it low.

 Q.  We need an instructional guide for that.

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  (Laughs.) 

Q.  What clubs did you use for those two shots?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yesterday I planned to hit a 30‑yard shot with my 60‑degree.  This morning I wanted to land a lower‑type shot on 35 with my 56‑degree.

Q.  Could you go through your timeline, what time you got in last night, what time you went to bed, what time you had to get up this morning, just that sort of thing?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  I think we finished play around 7:45.  Decided we were not going to cook so we went by Subway, got a sandwich, ate that.  When I got home, watched some tennis.  I think I was in bed by 9:30.  Got up 5:15, got to the golf course at 6:00, did a warm-up in the trailer, started my routine at 6:20.  Normally I take about an hour and 10 minutes, but it was dark and I had only two holes left, so yeah.

Q.  So no chance to hit balls before?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yeah, I did hit some balls.  I started putting and then I went over to the range.  So it was a little bit shorter than normal, but it was fine.  If (indiscernible) putt enough (indiscernible) to warm up.

Q.  Did you hit 16 greens both days, is that right?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  She told me, I guess, 17 and 17?

MODERATOR:  Yeah, 17 and 17.

Q.  You made three birdies and an eagle today.  Did you feel like you left some out there?  Were there some putts that maybe you feel like you should have made?  If so, where?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yes, definitely yesterday I putted ‑‑ I made more putts.  I left some out there today.  If so, where?  I don't know.  I hit so many greens and good shots.

Q.  (Inaudible.)

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yeah, it was nice.  I'm not quite sure.  They all went over the lip so I wasn't getting upset with myself, and my stroke still felt good so I was able to keep patient and made birdies on 15 and 17 coming in.

Q.  Then you had played very well in Canada with the 15th place, but then there's the week lull before this tournament.  Was that something you could still build on, or when you have a week off, can you never tell how it's going to affect you and how you might play?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  It wasn't so much that I could build on it from my swing feels good and my putting feels good, but most of that throughout the entire season I had in every tournament two rounds or three rounds that I played really well and then one round would kind of mess me up.  So Canada gave me the confidence just that I could play well four rounds in a row and that that would put me in a good finish.  So it just kind of, you know, rewarded my patience throughout the season.  Then I just had some good relaxing days at home and then had a good practice session while at home and I felt I was ready when I got here again.

Q.  Just one more quick one because you talked about how the rules snafu kind of irritated you, then you went out and birdied your first hole in the afternoon round.  Could you just take me through that first hole?  What did you hit, driver?  What iron to how close?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  It was a really quick turnaround because we had of course discussion in the trailer and then had to be right on the tee and I was first to tee off.  Hit driver solid up on the left side of the fairway and I believe it was a 7‑iron, not even that close; I believe it was, I'm going to say, 30 feet, 25, I don't know.  Yeah, just solid putt in the hole.  It's just nice, you know.  I'm on kind of ‑‑ I'm not upset but just okay, trying to concentrate and be like great, don't get too upset about it, you're playing well and hitting the shots you want to, so just keep focused on that.  If you can make a birdie on the first hole, that really keeps you going.

Q.  Just kind of following along that, was it also an official that ‑‑ you finished your warmup this morning, was it based on finishing the two holes and then making that turnaround and moving on?  Did that help you just kind of stay in a flow even though you had to do some other talking about the rules?  Was there a flow that you continued?

DEWI CLAIRE SCHREEFEL:  Yes, I was ‑‑ I was actually kind of happy that ‑‑ well, you always want to finish a round, but I wasn't too upset that we couldn't finish the round yesterday because I felt I was playing well and then I finished my round well just thinking about my shots, how I hit them.  So yes, there was a sense of a flow of one day leading into the other.  It was good we could just keep going rather that way than sitting in the clubhouse for 45 minutes, so yeah.

Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 2

 MODERATOR:  All right.  I'd like to welcome Stacy Lewis into the interview room.  Stacy, thanks for joining us.  This is kind of turning into your home away from home in the media center.  Good round today, 6‑under 65.  I know not the finish you really wanted, but can you just take me through the day, what went well?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah.  Well, coming up yesterday I thought I played well but I just didn't score very well, kind of made some mistakes on the par 5s.  So I knew I was playing well, just kind of needed to clean up the round a little bit.  I played really solid.  I had so many putts go over the edge of the hole and I had a couple bad swings coming in.  There's always a couple you want back.  But I've been kind of working on my swing over these last couple weeks, so it's nice to just see some shots going where they should go and I can just clean up a few little things for tomorrow.

MODERATOR:  I was looking at your stats and it said you had 31 putts yesterday and you only had 21 today.  Was this a big turning point in the difference between your rounds?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, for sure.  Yesterday, I wasn't comfortable on the greens yesterday.  I don't know if it was ‑‑ my speed was off early I think partly because of the rain and all that, but I just didn't really hit many good putts yesterday.  Hit a ton of greens, had chances.  And then we worked a little bit last night, it was pretty much in the dark but we worked a little bit and I kind of figured something out and hit some ‑‑ I hit a lot of really good putts today.

MODERATOR:  You played here in 2009 and missed the cut and then the LPGA took a break from the tournament.  What is it like to be back here in Kingsmill?

STACY LEWIS:  It's great to be back.  I mean, as long as the event has been here, I think I remember being in college and watching people play this event.  I mean, it was one of the staples.  It's one that when I came out on Tour everybody talked about, how much they loved it here.  You know, I didn't have a good experience my first time, but I didn't really remember much of the course coming back, so I kind of felt like I was coming here again for the first time, which sometimes that's not necessarily a bad thing.

MODERATOR:  You went to the Rockies game recently for the media day press conference for the Solheim Cup.  How was that and how excited are you for the Solheim Cup coming up next year?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, Angela and I, we went out to Denver last Monday and Tuesday and I think Angela was in heaven at the Rockies game.  If you've ever seen her at a baseball game, she's pretty excited.  It was a lot of fun.  We got to go sit right behind home plate.  It was cool to see the actual Solheim Cup back out there and kind of get that U.S. ‑ Europe rivalry going again.  We're less than a year away so it's coming on a lot quicker than I think everybody realizes.

Q.  You were telling us out there that you reached the par 5 in two.  Was it reachable yesterday as well or is it just playing differently today?

STACY LEWIS:  No, I actually reached ‑‑ I've been able to reach all the par 5s so far.  The wind was definitely opposite today, but I was still able to reach them.  Yesterday I had 3‑woods into all of them but today I had ‑‑ I had a hybrid into 3 and then a 3‑wood into 15 and 7.  So I think for the longer hitters, it's definitely reachable because you've got to carry them up on the green.  There's really no way to run them up there.

Q.  How big an advantage ‑‑ I'm guessing you're one of the few out here who can reach all the par 5s?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, I think, this golf course, it's huge.  Especially just off the tees, everything's kind of hitting and stopping just from all the rain.  So the further you carry in the air, I think ‑‑ I mean, it definitely favors a long ball hitter.  As you can see on the leaderboard, it's not the long hitters that seem to be doing well, so I don't know what that is.  But I think in the end it comes down to making putts and that's ‑‑ I think Jiyai shot 9‑under yesterday and she's one of the best putters on Tour.  So I think in the end making putts is what's going to take this thing.

Q.  I noticed you're third on Tour in greens in regulation.  Have you hit most every green through your two rounds here?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, I mean, I think I've been on the fringe for a couple of them but overall I haven't ‑‑ I know I haven't been chipping very much.  I guess that's a good thing.

MODERATOR:  What was it that you were working on last night with your putting that made it click today?

STACY LEWIS:  It was more in my setup.  I was just very uncomfortable over the ball.  I wasn't trusting where I was lined up or I didn't really know where I was lined up, just making bad strokes because of that.  So I kind of worked on some alignment things and just tried to get more comfortable over the ball.

Q.  You said at ShopRite that you had blown all of your goals out of the water not even midway through the year.  So what are the goals going into the second half of the season?

STACY LEWIS:  I'm kind of looking toward the end of the year to be Player of the Year.  That's kind of the final thing.  Week in and week out it's just win tournaments and give myself chances to win.  For Player of the Year I just need top 10s every week, so just giving myself chances to win, which is kind of what I've been doing all year.  But I mean long term, get the No. 1 spot from Yani, but I think for November I would like to be Player of the Year.

Q.  So this is Leta Lindley's last day and I know you've played in her charity event.  Can you kind of talk about what that event was like and why you frequented it?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, I played Leta's event only the last two years actually.  It's so cool to see the passion she has for it.  I think every time she gets up on the stage, she starts crying and makes everybody else in the room cry.  And you can see her passion for the family, just her heart and who she is.  It's just, I mean, we're losing a pretty cool person.  Every time you see Leta, whether she played good or played bad, she's got a smile on her face, and that's pretty rare out here truthfully.  Golf can be such a grind that she finds the positives in it and it's hard to believe she's been out here 18 years.

Q.  Last question.  Speaking of a grind, she only averages about 220 off the tee, so she hit a lot of 3‑woods.  Can you kind of talk about how much respect you probably have for a player who only hits it that far who's been able to sustain her good play all these years?

STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, I think you look especially probably the last five or six years, that's when kind of the distance thing has started.  Up until then she could hang in there.  We had golf courses like Corning where you could hit it a little bit shorter and kind of get away with it.  It's pretty impressive.  I mean, that's like me hitting hybrid off the tee all the time.  That would make a golf course pretty hard, so it's impressive I think just over the last end part of her career that she's been able to maintain it.

 
Leta Lindley, Rolex Rankings No. 252

MODERATOR:  We would like to welcome a very special guest into the interview room today, Leta Lindley, who is playing in her final event after 18 years out here on the LPGA Tour. Leta, it looks like you're not going to make the cut so this is the end of what has been a truly impressive career, very special one.  I know everybody's enjoyed having you out here.  Can you just take me through the emotions of today and what it's been like to be out here?

LETA LINDLEY:  Well, I didn't know what I would really feel like going into today, really the week.  I think I've had a mix of emotions, obviously very bittersweet, but knowing that it's the right time for me.  Obviously I was very tearful coming up 18.  I've been out here for 18 years and I've grown up out here and this has been my family for so long and it's been a big chunk of my life, but I know that it's time but it doesn't make it any less sad.

MODERATOR:  A special moment, though, with your husband on the bag, who's been with you almost your entire way of your career.  You guys, as you walked up 18, were holding hands and got to share a hug at the end.  What does it mean to you to have him here for this moment, but also what has he meant to you throughout your career?

LETA LINDLEY:  I never would have made it out here for 18 years without him by my side.  Not only is he an amazing caddie, but a wonderful husband, a cheerleader, psychologist, golf coach.  He's been everything to me and my victories have been his victories as well.  It's been so special that we could do it together.  Not many husband‑wife teams can work together and have the kind of relationship that we do and I'm most thankful for him.

MODERATOR:  And I know when you were talking to Golf Channel you were talking about how you two began this journey together just the two of you and ended it just the two of you because your two kids, you have an eight‑year old Cole and a six‑year old Reese, who are back at home and in school.  I'm sure a lot of this decision was based on them and we know how important it is for you to ‑‑ how important you consider your role as a mom to be, how special it is.  Now you get to be a full‑time mom at home.  What does that ‑‑ is that really kind of the reason for ‑‑

LETA LINDLEY:  Well, ultimately they're my legacy.  They're the most important thing to me.  I mean, I chase a little white ball out here and it's been a tremendous ride, but at the end of the day when my son cries when we leave and doesn't really understand and we try to explain to him that this is our job and this is how we buy food and toys and Wii games.  So we try to put it in a perspective that he understands, but all they know is that we're not home.  They still want to snuggle and they ‑‑ and I just want to enjoy that time before my son tells me I need to walk 10 steps behind him before I'm embarrassing him.  They grow up so fast and I can't believe that Cole is eight and Reese is six.  Before I know it, they're going to be out of the house and I just don't want to miss any more of that.  So it's time to create some different memories. 

I'm most proud of the career that I've had out here.  I'm the girl that was never going to do it.  I would never get a college scholarship, I would never win a college tournament, I would never get my card, let alone keep it.  And then to win a tournament after having two children, sometimes I feel like the little engine that could. 

This is the perfect example.  This golf course just played so long for me.  I hit so many 3‑woods, but just like I always have, I hung in there and I gutted it out and I got up and down and made some birdies and I never gave up.  That's been how I played all 18 years.  I never give up.

MODERATOR:  Well, for all of us hitters who maybe don't hit it as long as some of the other girls out here, you always were an inspiration, and I know you've been an inspiration off the golf course as well in everything you've done for charity and your work with the Prader‑Willi Syndrome. 

What does it mean for you to be able to leave a legacy on the golf course with what you've done, but also to be involved in so many charities and helping out others?

LETA LINDLEY:  Well, certainly I hope I left a positive mark on the Tour and that I've played with grace and represented women's golf and the LPGA, represented them well.  But certainly having the opportunity to use my golf for something better and bigger and helping children that have Prader‑Willi Syndrome, that has been my dream.  I always thought other players on Tour that were involved in charities and doing good works, that was always my dream and so I was so blessed to come across the Levine family, whose granddaughter has Prader‑Willi Syndrome, and to be able to generate funds and raise awareness and make a difference for those kids means so much to me.  And to be able to continue this work, you know, when I leave the Tour is very special as well.

MODERATOR:  And I know you had an event this week and even got to help in your last week. 

LETA LINDLEY:  I did, yes.

MODERATOR:  What was that like and how important was it for you to kind of finish out with that as well, make it a part of your last week out here on Tour?

LETA LINDLEY:  Well, it was really special because there was a family whose grandson was born with Prader‑Willi Syndrome about four months ago, and of course the first thing you do is you get online and you Google it.  And being a lover of golf, Ned Fry said, Oh, there's a golf tournament that benefits Prader‑Willi Syndrome and there's an LPGA player that does good work for them.  He's like, I wonder if she's coming to Kingsmill, and got in touch with the Levine family and he just wanted to meet me, and through his connections with SunTrust they sponsored an event on Wednesday night, hosted a little cocktail party and some of my good friends out on Tour joined me and we were able to raise I believe over $12,000 for Prader‑Willi research.  So just a little cocktail party for two hours, I mean, that is super special, just kind of capped off the week for me.

Q.  (Inaudible)

LETA LINDLEY:  Well, I was really lucky that I had Matt by my side and able to help me juggle all of that, but certainly I think having children freed me up, it gave me a different perspective on my golf and it wasn't do or die.  Shooting 80 didn't seem so horrible when I got to go home and see my little ones, and I think I played with more freedom and also enjoyment.  I think they came to me during a time when I was starting to get burnt out ‑‑ I think I had Cole after 10 years on Tour ‑‑ and you're just grinding it out.  You play eight in a row and before you knew it, the off season wasn't very long and you would be starting again, and I just came back with new energy and just enjoyed it.  I just think the perspective changes so much, and if they can keep that in mind and just enjoy those special moments, I think it frees you up to play.  I think I played my best golf after having children.

Q.  (Inaudible) Some of them are on and off but you guys have been together for the long haul.  Why does it work for you two, or why did it work?

LETA LINDLEY:  I think there's two reasons.  I'm a very positive person and I don't blame other people for my bad shots.  Ultimately I hit the bad shot, so I take responsibility for that.  And at the end of the day, I know that no one is cheering harder for me than Matt, no one.  He wants what is best for me more than I do, so I think that just goes a long way with me knowing how much he cares and how hard he's trying.  He's not trying to mess me up or put me in the bunker.  So we're trying our best and I just think it was just more special doing it with him. 

You spend a lot of time with your caddie, it's almost like a second marriage, and it took me a while just to find Matt and I like him, I like being with him, and I think that he feels the same way.  I'm most comfortable with him.  I felt like he brought the best out in me because he believed in me sometimes more than I believed in myself, especially being a shorter hitter.  I always felt ‑‑ there were caddies who would say, Well, she can't play that golf course, it's too long.  Matt would never tell me that.  He would say, You can play it.  If you hit the ball solid and you chip and put well, you can play any golf course. 

Those are the things I needed to hear and he would always tell me how good I am.  Sometimes when I wasn't believing in myself, he would pump me up and lift me up and help me play some of my best golf, I think.

Q.  What do you think your legacy will be?

LETA LINDLEY:  On Tour? I hope I set a good example for the girls that are out here.  I hope that I won with grace.  You know, I enjoyed what I was doing and I hope that that showed inside the ropes.  Even when things weren't going well and the way that I wanted to on the golf course, I conducted myself in ‑‑ I'm not sure what the word I would be looking for; you just couldn't tell, you couldn't tell things were bad or if they were good.  I just ‑‑ I was always positive, I never gave up. 

And it's funny because a couple players have come up to me in the last couple weeks and asked me, you know, You've been out here for 18 years, what is your secret?  And I told Maria Hernandez, I said, It's because it's in here. 

I've seen so many players that hit it so much better than I do and have oodles of more talent.  Why am I still here and they're not?  I just think there's something in my heart of never giving up.  I didn't care if I was missing the cut by five shots, I was trying the hardest on every shot coming in because that might make the difference for me next week.  So if I exhibited that and I could teach the younger players that and then I was a good role model, then I feel like I've done a good job out here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Kingsmill Championship, Kang, Danielle, Shin, Jiyai, Lindley, Leta, Lewis, Stacy, Schreefel, Dewi Claire [+]

Andrews Sports MedicineArpin Van LinesFloridas NaturalMedjet AssistMichelob ULTRAPrudentialSmuckers