RICOH Women's British Open second-round notes and interviews

RICOH Women’s British Open
Royal Liverpool Golf Club
Wirral, United Kingdom
September 15, 2012
Second-round Notes and Interviews

Jiyai Shin -9, Rolex Rankings No. 10
Inbee Park -4, Rolex Rankings No. 9
Mika Miyazato -3, Rolex Rankings No. 11
Karrie Webb -3, Rolex Rankings No. 21
Lydia Ko -1, (a)
Angela Stanford E, Rolex Rankings No. 18
Michelle Wie +1, Rolex Rankings No. 53


Rolex Rankings No. 10 Jiyai Shin captured her first victory in nearly two years on the LPGA Tour last week and now she’s on her way to making it two wins in a row.
Shin pulled away from the field in the second round of the RICOH Women’s British Open, firing an 8-under 64 to take a five-shot lead with an overall score of 9-under-par 135.

The day after 60 mph wind gusts forced the postponement of the second round, the weather proved to be much improved at the Royal Liverpool Golf Club on Saturday. The wind was a factor early in the day and towards the end of play, but with calmer weather midday a few players were able to take advantage of the better scoring conditions, including Shin.

Shin, who won the 2008 RICOH Women’s British Open at Sunningdale, got off to an impressively hot start to her round. Teeing off on No. 10, she went eagle, birdie, birdie, birdie to go 5-under through her first four holes of the day. She then kept the putter going with birdies on her seventh and 13th holes respectively and capped off her round with another birdie on the par-4 7th, her 16th hole of the day. The nine-time LPGA winner hit all 18 greens in regulation during her second round and needed just 28 putts.

“A bogey-free day and then bunker-free, too,” said Shin, who described it as one of the best rounds she’s ever played. “So that is a good thing, today's golf.  I missed just one fairway.  And on the back nine, it's blowing very strong wind, but I just stay focused on my tempo and my timing with my driver and shots.”

To put into perspective just how good Shin played on Saturday, her score was four shots better than the next lowest score on the day. That round, a 4-under 68, was delivered by Rolex Rankings No. 9 Inbee Park, who is sitting five shots back of Shin heading into Sunday’s 36-hole day.


Breaking records:
Shin’s 8-under 64 is the lowest round recorded in competition at Royal Liverpool Golf Club. The previous low round on this course had been a 7-under 65 that was shot by four players during the 2006 Open Championship. It is also Shin’s lowest score in a major championship and ties the lowest second-round score shot in Women’s British Open history.  She becomes the fourth player to shoot that score in the second round, joining Suzann Pettersen (2001), Se Ri Pak (2011) and Inbee Park (2011).

Shin is also attempting to become the first LPGA player to win the RICOH Women’s British Open the week after capturing the previous LPGA event. On Monday, Shin defeated Paula Creamer on the ninth playoff hole to win the Kingsmill Championship.


Bringing back good memories:
Ask Jiyai Shin about the biggest victory of her already impressive career, which includes nine LPGA Tour wins, and the 24-year-old doesn’t hesitate on which one it is.

“This tournament, very special for me, because I won [it in] 2008 and it changed, huge, my life,” Shin said. “When I won in 2008, I was not a member of the LPGA, so after that, I got a Tour card on the LPGA, that was the biggest thing.  And also, normally before -- in 2008, my main goal was KLPGA, and normally I'm watching the LPGA on the TV. So I'm all the time dreaming about this Tour, and I really respect, and then it's just like some of the top players, really great, like different level about my game.

“But after that win, it's just like, oh, wow, I can make this, too.  So I get a lot of confidence and I finally get the Tour card on the LPGA.  I think both has changed my life, yeah.”

Shin said she watched video of her victory at the 2008 RICOH Women’s British Open after undergoing surgery on her left wrist back on May 24. She was forced to miss two months of play following the surgery and during her recovery time in Korea, she watched some of her victories to put herself in a good mental state. It seemed to work.

“My first event after operation, I play in Japan first, and then straight after, Evian Masters,” said Shin, who will be seeking her second major victory. “So my first event in Japan, I finished third, so I was surprised, too, very surprised.”


On a roll…
Inbee Park has been playing some of the best golf of her career in recent weeks and that hot streak has continued this week at the RICOH Women’s British Open.

Park entered this week having recorded eight straight top-10 finishes, which included a victory at the Evian Masters as well as three runner-up finishes. Her strong play has continued this week as she followed up an opening-round 72 with her 4-under 68 on Saturday.

“I had a lot of easy birdies on the back nine, and the front nine was really tough because the wind picked up,” said Park, who was paired with Shin and teed off on No. 10. “I've been playing the front nine really hard because my ball is a little bit right-to-left shape and the wind is coming right-to-left, so I just have to watch the front nine a little bit more the next two days.  The back nine I've been playing great and I've been having a lot of birdies on the back nine, so feeling really confident with the back nine.”


Sticking around for Sunday:
With the loss of a whole day’s play on Friday and weather conditions for Monday predicted to be similar to what they were on Friday, the Championship Committee for the RICOH Women’s British Open made an amendment to the event’s original cut line.

The cut was reduced from 65 plus ties to 50 plus ties, including amateurs. The cut line fell at 5-over-par 149 and a total of 57 players made the cut. In addition to those players who make the cut, official prize money will be paid to those players who would have normally made the cut under the original conditions of play.

“Obviously they are doing everything they can to finish by Sunday, so I mean, definitely cutting at 50 helps that,” said Michelle Wie, who shot a 2-under 70 on Saturday and sits at 1-over-par for the championship. “I was a bit surprised, still, getting that e-mail yesterday, but they have to do what they have to do.”


Let’s play two!
With the second round now complete at the 2012 RICOH Women’s British Open, the plan is to have the field complete 36 holes on Sunday and crown a new winner without having to extend the tournament an extra day.

In order to do that, the field will not be repaired after the completion of the third round. Players will also tee off from both No. 1 and No. 10.


Four-time winner?
Karrie Webb has already won the Women’s British Open three times in her career (1995, 1997 and 2002), with the last one coming after it became a major on the LPGA Tour in 2001. So perhaps it’s no surprise to see the 37-year-old in the hunt at this championship once again.

Webb shot a 2-under 70 in the second round and currently sits in a T3 at 3-under-par. She’s seeking her eighth career major victory and her 39th LPGA Tour victory.

“I'm happy to be at 3-under and I'm surprised to be six shots behind being at 3-under,” Webb said. “But you know, I'm happy with the way I played and handled the golf course. When there was no wind today, I wasn't swinging as well as I would have liked.  When the conditions were tougher, it made me fight a little bit and get more creative and hit more golf shots rather than technically trying to play my way around the course.”


Feels like home…
Mika Miyazato grew up in Okinawa, Japan, which is located on the water, so playing golf in the wind is nothing new for the 22-year-old.

Miyazato showed her ability to deliver a solid performance in windy conditions as she shot a 2-under 70 on Saturday and moved into a tie for third place at 3-under-par. She tallied four birdies and two bogeys on the day. The round was highlighted by a 55-yard pitch-in for birdie on the par-5 fifth.

“It is difficult but I'm thinking [it’s] not a difficult golf course,” Miyazato said of Liverpool Golf Club. “Because that means, negative thinking, so [I want] smart thinking.”


Taking advantage:
Angela Stanford was 4-over-par through four holes on Friday morning before second-round play was halted due to the strong winds that made the course unplayable. With the decision to nullify the scores from Friday, Stanford was given the chance to restart her round on Saturday morning and the 12-year LPGA veteran took advantage.

Stanford fired an even-par 72 in her second round, keeping her at even par for the tournament and giving her a chance to make a run at her sixth career LPGA title during Sunday’s 36-hole finale.

This wasn’t the first time that Stanford had experienced scores from a round being wiped out.  The last time was at the 2003 Samsung World Championship in Houston and at that time, she had made up ground. So this time the decision worked out in her favor and she was appreciative of the second chance.

“I saw when I came off the course how far I had fallen, just being 4-over through four holes,” Stanford said of her play on Friday. “So I was very grateful on the first hole today even hitting 3-wood into the first hole.  I thought, well, the 3-wood didn't sniff the green yesterday.  So I’m very thankful and I have been in both spots, and I felt for Brittany Lang, because I knew she was 1-under through a couple. I guess it all does even out.”

Of Note…Yani Tseng still has a chance at capturing a historic three-peat this week. The two-time defending champion shot her second straight even-par 72 and sits nine shots back of leader, Jiyai Shin, with 36 holes remaining…Of the 144 players in the field, only six shot in the 60s on Saturday…Amateur Lydia Ko continues to impress with her play, shooting a 1-under 71 in the second round. She’s currently the leading amateur in the field.

Jiyai Shin, Rolex Rankings No. 10

COLIN CALLANDER:  Congratulations, a magnificent 64 today.  I believe that's the best round you've ever had in a major?
JIYAI SHIN:  Yes, it's true.  I can't believe the way I hit it, 64 shots today on this course, it's really tough.  And then I was surprised, the first hole I made an eagle, 30 yards chipping in.  So it was a good start.

COLIN CALLANDER:  I think you made three birdies back-to-back after that, as well.  So a great start.
JIYAI SHIN:  Yeah, it's true, after the eagle I feel really good.  I feel like really excited and then I hit another great shot the next three holes and made birdies.

Q.  If somebody asks you what's the best round you've ever had in your life, what do you say?
JIYAI SHIN:  No, actually I just played last week at the Kingsmill, I hit 9-under par.  And then -- but it's a totally different golf course.  Kingsmill was a great golf course, also, but much softer green and fairways, so easy to hit aggressive shots to the flag, but not this course.  This course is really tough.  So actually this week my goal was 1-under par every single day.  But I hit 8-under par, wow.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Given you were 8-under par on this very, very tough golf course, is that the best round you have played?
JIYAI SHIN:  I think so, because today, a bogey-free day and then bunker-free, too.  So that is a good thing, today's golf.  I missed just one fairway.  And on the back nine, it's blowing very strong wind, but I just stay focused on my tempo and my timing with my driver and shots.  So it was work.

Q.  You've played some of your best golf in the last three tournaments, tied for third, won in a playoff and then here.  How do you explain that?
JIYAI SHIN:  It's funny, before that, like I thought it was good I guess, and all three events, I have great memories.  So when I played in Canada and Kingsmill and here, I'm just happy.  I'm really very confident and comfortable here, even this tournament, very special for me, because I won the 2008 and it changed, huge, my life.

So that's why I come back to here and after that, I got a lot of fans in England, so I'm really blessed today for my fans, because today there was a lot of people out there, and then they keep cheering for me.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Is this one of your favourite events?
JIYAI SHIN:  Why not?  Yes, of course.  Yeah, in 2008, it was great memory for me.  So when some people ask me what's your best win in your life, I definitely I chose this.

Q.  You had nine holes extra last weekend, and now you have 36 holes tomorrow.  Can you just talk about how you're feeling about the two rounds and if you have any different mind-set?
JIYAI SHIN:  Actually after the first round, I was still tired, but yesterday I take the big rest all day staying in hotel, long sleep, and I feel a lot better today.

I know I play 36 holes tomorrow, but I know I've played lots of holes so I just keep focussed for the recovery, the physical recovery tonight and then just keep going forward to tomorrow.

Q.  Have you ever played 36 holes in one day before?
JIYAI SHIN:  Actually two years ago in the Match Play, I played two days in a row, 33 and 35 holes.

Q.  Did you feel like you left any shots out there?
JIYAI SHIN:  Maybe, but I'm already happy with the new score.  I had another couple more chances, but this golf course, don't know how -- even short putts really tough because the wind was blowing so hard.  I just keep focussed every single putt, too.  So I'm really happy with my score.

Q.  And in the 2006 Open, Tiger Woods had a 65, and then went on to win it; do you think the 64 could be the thing that has you go onto win this tournament?
JIYAI SHIN:  I think so, because I know I have five strokes for second place, but this golf course, nobody knows -- I'm not sure about the five strokes.
So if the golf game is very -- sometimes make you weird, sometimes make great.  So I just keep focussed on my game.  I know so many great players out there.  But I just keep focussed on myself.

Q.  Did you ever worry when you were injured that you would not be able to play again like this?
JIYAI SHIN:  Not really, because I believe in myself, that's the good thing.  So I know that it was tough choice to take operation, make the decision, but if I keep playing in June and July, I feel -- I think maybe make more bad conditions.

So I think it was great choice and when I -- after operation, when I recover, I just only good thinking about my golf.  So a lot of time we watch it when I won this tournament and another tournament, too.

Q.  What day was the operation and what was the actual operation on your wrist?
JIYAI SHIN:  It was May 24, 26, I take the operation and after that, I go back to Korea for, I would say, a couple months for the recovery.

Q.  What did they do to the wrist?  What was the problem?
JIYAI SHIN:  Actually my left hand, this part right here -- actually my palm was small bone was broken, so I just take it out and another -- so many players say, you practise too much, too many practise.  I feel much better now.  So just take care.

Q.  How many weeks without playing?  When did you start playing again?
JIYAI SHIN:  I stopped play exactly for two months, and then -- first my first event after operation, I play in Japan first, and then straight after, Evian Masters.  So first event in Japan, I finished third, so I was surprised, too, very surprised.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Do you have any pain at all now or is it okay?
JIYAI SHIN:  Actually there was a little pain, but I know a lot of big tournaments come up, so I just keep playing and then a recovery.

Q.  I followed you and I could feel the wind picking up again.  Were you conscious of the wind over the last four or five holes?
JIYAI SHIN:  When I turned, when I start on the 10th today, and then when I played on the front nine, after the second hole, it was blowing -- wind was blowing so hard, so actually No. 3 hole was really hard hole for me because first day I hit a driver, I hit a 3-wood, and I couldn't get it to the green.

But today when I'm standing on the tee ground, it was blowing so hard into my face, so, okay, I just keep focussed on my 10th hole and then hit it a little bit lower and a little driver and then I hit 3-wood.  Finally I made it and just got three and 2-putt.

Third hole really in my head is more tough hole for me, so after great par, after that, it's just like, good confidence with the wind, too.  Even today my shot was great.  So I just kept focussed to the fairway and green all the time.

Q.  Did it help having Park in the group, as well, pushing you harder to keep ahead of her?
JIYAI SHIN:  I think so, because when I'm watching her game, her putting and driver shot was great.  And then also, she has a great tempo with her shots, so when I'm watching -- normally I'm not watching the other players swing, but I just watching In-Bee's swing on the 10th hole and I just keep in mind about doing my tempo, so I think it was a good thing for me.

Q.  You said winning in 2008 changed your life hugely; how did it change?
JIYAI SHIN:  When I won in 2008, I was not a member of the LPGA, so after that, I got a Tour card on the LPGA, that was the biggest thing.  And also, normally before -- in 2008, my main goal was KLPGA, and normally I'm watching the LPGA on the TV.

So I'm all the time dreaming about this Tour, and I really respect, and then it's just like some of the top players, really great, like different level about my game.
But after that win, it's just like, oh, wow, I can make this, too.  So I get a lot of confidence and I finally get the Tour card on the LPGA.  I think both has changed my life, yeah.

Q.  Tiger talked about this course on the LPGA website.  Did you watch it at all before you teed off?
JIYAI SHIN:  Not really.  I know that he won, he knows about this course, but the men and women, it's a different type of game.  So I watch his playing on this course, and so I know how he played.
But normally he played with No. 2, No. 3 irons, but I don't have any irons, 2 or 3.  Mostly I hit driver (laughing).  So that's why a little bit different, the course management.  Yeah, that's why.

Q.  Are you concerned about the weather forecast for tomorrow?
JIYAI SHIN:  Yeah, I heard that a lot of chance of the rain, and hopefully good weather for tomorrow, just keep dry today.  Even if it's bad weather coming, it's not only for me; all players same conditions.  So I just keep focus on my shot and game.

Q.  Now that you've played this course a few times this week in practise and in the tournament, how would you rate it as a golf course?  What do you think of this golf course?
JIYAI SHIN:  Definitely I could say, really tough course.

Q.  Do you like it?
JIYAI SHIN:  Yes, I do.  It makes a big challenge of all my skills with all the clubs.  So it's really fun.  And actually, after the playoff last week, or actually this week, upon day, when I fly to here on Tuesday in the afternoon and big rest, I came out Wednesday, I played the front nine, but on the back nine I couldn't play because the weather was so bad, windy and rain.  So I just walk around.
So first day, I'm not sure about this course because I didn't play on the back nine.  But today I know much better than first round, so I make sure which -- each target, and then feel better and good score.

Q.  You mentioned about not going in bunkers and hitting the fairways; is there anything else about how you played that has led to this amazing score?
JIYAI SHIN:  Actually, this course has a lot of bunkers, a lot of small, tiny, deep bunkers.  So first I focussed to just get keep in fairway, and then even strong wind or even long hole, I just keep focussed with the short club and long club.  I miss only one fairway, and it was just first cut, too.  I think that's the key for tomorrow, too.

Q.  Which was the one fairway you missed?
JIYAI SHIN:  No. 1.  My first hole was No. 10 but I missed on No. 1.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Could we quickly go over the clubs for the eagles, birdies.
JIYAI SHIN:  Oh, I do a lot of eagles, birdies.  I start on 10.  I made an eagle.  I hit driver, 3-wood and 30 yards left.  I hit a 60-degree wedge and just couple bounce and in.
Then I hit a driver and I hit a 6-iron within 155 yards and it was great shot.  Just like ten feet to the hole.
12, I hit a driver and hit 5-iron 160 yards into the wind and 10-foot putt.
13, I hit a 6-iron and it was like 12-foot to the hole and just made that.
16, it was a par 5.  I hit a driver and I had a chance to hit two on, but it had a lot of bunkers, so I just hit it short to the bunker.  I hit a 19-degree hybrid and it was 60 yards to the hole.  I hit using 60-degree wedges and like 15, 17 -- between 15 and 17 feet to the hole.
4, I hit a 5-wood on the tee shot and 7-iron 150 yards and like 30 feet to the hole.
7, hit a 3-wood and hit a pitching wedge 130 yards and it was just one foot to the hole.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Do you remember how many greens you hit in regulation.
JIYAI SHIN:  I didn't miss any greens today.

Q.  On the PGA TOUR, there have been a number of tours who have had big leads and they have talked about how in some ways, it's tougher to have a big lead, because you're expected to win when you're that far ahead.  Do you see any downside to being five shots ahead?
JIYAI SHIN:  Well, first I'm surprised at the state of my game, so hopefully I just keep it going for tomorrow and 36 holes.  And actually, five shots is a really big gap, but at first like -- we don't know about this course, because that's why with Anna and In-Bee, when I saw that Anna, she played good, but she missed one hole, she made it a big score in one hole, so that's why this course, I would say it's really tough.  Yeah, just five strokes, I think -- I'm not sure for the wind but I'm just keeping going.

Q.  Yani Tseng said she would like a five-stroke lead going down the last five holes when she was in a couple days ago; do you think that will be enough?
JIYAI SHIN:  But if it has a lot of gap, still, it makes a little bit nervous and pressure, too.  Sounds like enough but I tried to keep it focus until 18, finish the 18th.

Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 9

Q.  Fantastic round today, can you tell me about it, birdies and bogeys?
IN-BEE PARK:  Yeah, I had birdies -- I mean, I had the back nine, I had a lot of easy birdies on the back nine, and the front nine was really tough because the wind picked up.

I've been playing the front nine really hard because my ball is a little bit right-to-left shape and the wind is coming right-to-left, so I just have to watch the front nine a little bit more the next two days.  The back nine I've been playing great and I've been having a lot of birdies on the back nine, so feeling really confident with the back nine.

Q.  A lot of people are finding the front nine harder than the back nine.  You said the next two days, but, in fact, it's one day.  How do you feel about playing 36 tomorrow?
IN-BEE PARK:  It's going to be a lot of patience tomorrow and got to sleep well tonight, and hopefully good conditions tomorrow.

Q.  So you're looking forward to it?
IN-BEE PARK:  Yeah, of course.

Q.  And today the course was playing a lot nicer weather than the last couple days; so you are enjoying links golf?
IN-BEE PARK:  Yeah, the weather's been quite nice for us -- I didn't come out yesterday so I didn't see the bad weather.  But it's really a great golf course and you can feel the history on the golf course.  It's great.

Q.  And what did you do yesterday with your day off?
IN-BEE PARK:  I just stayed home all day, relaxed.

Q.  How did you spend your time?
IN-BEE PARK:  I'm staying in a house with a couple of friends and we just had a lot of fun.

Q.  So you feel quite refreshed?
IN-BEE PARK:  Yeah.

Mika Miyazato, Rolex Rankings No. 11

COLIN CALLANDER:  We have Mika Miyazato who has just fired a 2-under par 70 for a total of 3-under par total after two rounds.  You must be very pleased.
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Thank you.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Did you play very well?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Yes, I was patient out there, and I got a fast start.  No. 18, I hit to about 30 sent meters, close to the pin on my third shot from 30 yards.  I hit 58.

COLIN CALLANDER:  And you birdied the first hole.
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Also I hit the second shot 3-wood, like 190 into the wind to just one feet, two feet.

COLIN CALLANDER:  You dropped a shot at the third hole.
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Yeah, third hole is -- I hit a hybrid second shot, pulled it a little bit left and I hit a third shot -- but I ended up putting.  Then par putt was like 15 feet.
5, I hit 5-wood.  I went into left side of the bunker, then just laying up and then 55 yards to the pin.  I just made it.

COLIN CALLANDER:  You holed it?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Yes.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Good shot.  And the eighth?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  8, I hit 5-iron like 160 yards into the wind, 35 feet.
The last hole, I hit 6-iron just short about 15 yards.  I hit a chip shot, 58, but it was over the pin, like ten feet.

COLIN CALLANDER:  And how were the conditions today?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  I think not so bad.  The wind is always out there but I pretty much stayed to my course management.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Do you think it's a difficult golf course?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  I think this golf course, but I don't think thinking it's a difficult golf course but I don't thinking it's a difficult golf course means, negative thinking, so smart thinking --

COLIN CALLANDER:  You were just trying to stay positive?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Stay positive.

Q.  You're in the middle of a great run including a victory, what's that down to?  You have Top-10s and top finishes in your last few tournaments?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Yeah, to win the tournament -- I have a lot of confidence in my golf game.

Q.  What do you put this really good round down to today?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  I'm not thinking the result, just more one shot at a time and talking with my caddie about the course management, I think that's why.

Q.  And how difficult is the golf course?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  It is difficult but I'm thinking not a difficult golf course.

Q.  What time did you have to get up yesterday and today?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Get up?  3.30, 4.00, two days in a row.

Q.  And what happened to you on the course yesterday?  Can you tell us about your time on the course yesterday?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Yesterday I played just two holes but I think nice par save, like up-and-down.  I think more playing yesterday -- but to finish the tournament, chance to finish the tournament, and after the round, so much boring.

Q.  What did you do after the round yesterday, just sit around?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  More practise just around driving here.

Q.  Were you happy it was called off yesterday because of the weather, or would you like to have played?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  I don't know.  I can't play yesterday but the problem is the ball moving.

Q.  What would have been a good score yesterday?  If you had to play, do you think 85, 90?  What would have been a very good score? 
MIKA MIYAZATO:  85?   (Laughter).

Q.  How different is it playing Europe than either the LPGA Tour or the Asian Tour?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Different.  This golf course, a links golf course, I feel like it's very close to the ocean.  As a junior, I played in lots of wind -- punch shots -- it's not past experience.
So I know that this golf course has so much windy, but I know it's hard to play the golf course.  So in America, not so much wind, but greens are more tough.  And Asia, also, too.

Q.  Do you enjoy links golf?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  Yeah, I like it.

Q.  I know you gave money to the tsunami last year; did you know family or friends that were affected?  Was anybody that you knew affected by it?
MIKA MIYAZATO:  My family is okay

Karrie Webb, Rolex Rankings No. 21

Q.  Eagle at 16 I'm sure helped the cause on the back nine, but are you happy to be six behind heading into tomorrow?
KARRIE WEBB:  I'm happy to be at 3-under and I'm surprised to be six shots behind being at 3-under.  But you know, I'm happy with the way I played and handled the golf course.

You know, it wasn't, when there was no wind today, I wasn't swinging as well as I would have liked.  When the conditions were tougher, it made me fight a little bit and get more creative and hit more golf shots rather than technically trying to play my way around the course.

Q.  Was it a surprise in the early part of the round to have such good condition?
KARRIE WEBB:  Yeah, I didn't think any of us thought we would be out there talking about -- there was probably about two yards of breeze.  Yeah, it was nice, because I think tomorrow it's going to be pretty awful again.

Q.  When you look out there and see a 64 from Jiyai Shin, what do you think?
KARRIE WEBB:  Yeah, obviously it was an impressive round.  I don't really see 64 on the golf course.  Obviously she got off to a flyer which really set the tone to her round.

Q.  Heading into tomorrow, what is mind-set?  Do you want bad weather?  Will that make the gap a little bit smaller between you and Jiyai?
KARRIE WEBB:  Yeah, I think a little bit of bad weather.  Obviously 36 holes to go, you have to remember, even though it's Sunday, there's 36 holes out there.  Just try to narrow the gap and see how it goes.

Q.  What was your reaction to the decision to cut it to Top-50 and ties and play 36 holes in an effort to get it in on Sunday?  There was a worry they would not be able to do it because of the weather forecast.  What was your reaction?
KARRIE WEBB:  I don't know, I think -- what is the right decision; you know, playing on Monday and maybe not even being able to get done.  I think anyone that finishes between 50 and 65 if they would have made the cut at 65 and ties, they would at least be getting paid and I think that's the right thing to do.

I don't know, it's a tough call.  Maybe if we're going to talk about hindsight, we shouldn't have double cut and rolled the greens yesterday.

Lydia Ko, (a)

Q.  Talk about today.
LYDIA KO:  You know, after really tough start, bogey, bogey -- I mean, 1-under is not too bad.  It was a lot more windy.  Pretty happy.

Q.  What were you sitting knowing you had 16 holes on one of the toughest golf courses to come and you struggled?
LYDIA KO:  To me the first hole was -- 3-wood off the tee and then wood into the green.  Tough hole really.  I mean, I bogeyed No. 2, two days ago, also, so wasn't the best hole.  But just got to get over it.  It's not like I'm going to play any better.

Q.  Where are you playing in terms of how good you can play?  Maybe in terms of how you played in Canada?
LYDIA KO:  I think a little worse than Canada, but I mean, I'm still playing good.  It's not like I'm playing really bad.  I played pretty much the best that I could in Canada, and that's how I won.  I mean, I'm playing pretty good golf and it's a pretty tough golf course, so I'm pleased.

Q.  Does it suit you, playing 36 holes tomorrow?
LYDIA KO:  I'll definitely be tired after all that, but I played the U.S. Amateur, which was like 35 holes in match play.  So I guess I'm a little used to it.

Q.  And do you realise the significance of what you could do tomorrow?  You would re-write the records.
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, I could, but you know, all I've got to do is just play my best and take it one shot at a time.

Q.  And what is your plan long term?  Do you want to turn professional?  I know you talked about going to Stanford; tell us what you have planned for the next few years.
LYDIA KO:  I want to graduate high school and then hopefully go to college in the States.  I'm missing a lot of school at the moment and I should be at school at the moment.

Yeah, Stanford is a goal very up there, and it's a very academic school at the same time.  I want to go to a college in California at least.

Q.  Difficult start for you but you finished nice?
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, bogeys on 1 and 2, and I'm like, wow, but there's been worse scores before after the first two holes, anyway, so can't be too disappointed and 16 more holes to go.  I was okay.  And then a birdie on 5 got me up there, and then at even par, I'm like, I don't owe anything.

Q.  Going to try to get the Smith Medal?
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, the leading amateur medal, that would be really nice.  All in all I just have to try my best; it's the world's best out here, so I can't expect something amazing.  You know, I've done good, so all I've got to do is just stay confident.

Q.  I heard you also saying that you've got various medals so far, and won the U.S. Open one, were there other ones, as well?
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, I got the U.S. Open Leading Amateur Medal and semifinal U.S. Juniors.  And I won the U.S. Amateur and I won the Canadian Open, and they are all the tournaments I've played so far.

Q.  So you need another medal?
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, I'd like to get another medal.

Q.  Why do you wear the Pink Panther badge on the hat?
LYDIA KO:  I have a Pink Panther head cover, but it kind of got old.  And I ordered that two years ago and this was in the package but it was left at my uncle's place.  Yeah, when we went there this year, she said, oh, I forgot to give this to you two years ago.

Q.  So you're a big fan of the TV programme or something to do with Paula Creamer, as well?
LYDIA KO:  I've always liked Paula Creamer and I mean, I really like the character, as well.

Angela Stanford, Rolex Rankings No. 18

Q.  That was a very early start, what time did you get up, and were you still half asleep on the first tee?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Yeah, I think my alarm went off at 4.  I couldn't actually see the ball land until about the fifth hole.  Maybe my eyes are bad (laughing).

Q.  How different were the conditions today compared to yesterday morning?
ANGELA STANFORD:  A lot better.  It's kind of frustrating now because it's absolutely perfect out here and the wind has died out.  But I'm very thankful that I got to play this morning and didn't have to finish my round yesterday.  It was a lot different.

Q.  Let's talk about the round, how happy are you to finish at level par through 36 holes and just give us your impressions?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I can't remember ever being at even par after 36 at a British.  So I'm very happy with that.  Very happy with how I'm hitting the ball and controlling my ball.

So I'm happy where I am.  I think that the scores are going to be lower this afternoon, but you know, we are going to play 36 tomorrow and I like doing that sometimes.

So just get out there and when it's good, it's good.  I've had more good 36-hole days than not.

Q.  Talk about the fact that they are going to make the cut 50 and ties; what is your impression of that, and are you happy with it?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Well, my dad told me a long time ago, you never know what the weather is going to do when you start a tournament, so you'd better be close to the top.  You never know what's going to happen over here and I knew it being even yesterday, that that was a good spot.
And when I heard that it went to 50, I could hear my dad in the back of my mind saying, that's why you have to play good starting from day one because you don't know what's going to happen.

Q.  What's your feeling that we have had two teenagers win on Tour?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Obviously the media I think loves the younger kids winning.  I think it's good for our Tour if they are in it for the long haul.  I worry about the longevity of the Tour, because I've been out here for 12 years, and I'm 34, and I feel like my prime was -- I'm kind of in the middle.  I get kind of fearful for some of these younger ones.  I hope they see their 30s out here because sometimes you play your best in your 30s.  That's the only thing I worry about is if they get too burnt out.  If you're winning at 15, 16, 17, I mean, think when you're 30; that's a long time.  That's a long time on Tour.
So I hope that they are in it for the long haul, because then I think it's really good for our Tour.

Q.  Three birdies, three bogeys…Pretty consistent, would you say?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Yeah, I actually don't remember some of the front side.  I know I hit one of the best 3-woods of my life on No. 1.  Striped a 3-wood into the first hole and I thought, I guess I'd better wake up, because it was tough I thought in the beginning.

And the birdies, I think you if you kind just of stay patient out there and you find your spots where you hit it close -- you're meaning to hit it close every time, but it doesn't work out, but the times it does, you have kick-ins sometimes.  I think those are my birdies.

Q.  I saw you Tweeted yesterday where you've been through that before where you've had scores nullified, and you said it was not what you wanted the last time, but yesterday it was probably a good thing.  How much was your mind-set today to take advantage of a restart?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Very much so.  I knew that -- because I saw when I came off the course how far I had fallen, just being 4-over through four holes.  So I was very grateful on the first hole today even hitting the 3-wood into the first hole.  I thought, well, the 3-wood didn't sniff the green yesterday.  So very thankful and I had been in both spots, and I felt for Bee Lang, because I knew she was 1-under through a couple.
I guess it all does even out.

 

Michelle Wie, Rolex Rankings No. 53

COLIN CALLANDER:  We have Michelle Wie, just finished a 1-over par total, a fine round today.  Completely different today, wasn't it?
MICHELLE WIE:  It's amazing how different it was today.  You know, we were talking out there about how many stroke difference it would have been if we played yesterday.  But it was perfect for me today.  It was nice.

COLIN CALLANDER:  When you started out, it was still a bit of wind?
MICHELLE WIE:  Oh, there's a bit of wind when I started but nothing like yesterday.  The wind just stopped now.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Did you think because of that, the afternoon starters might have a might advantage?
MICHELLE WIE:  They might, they might not; but you can't really think about that.  You can't control the weather or other people playing.  So I'm just going to think about tomorrow.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Scores are still pretty tough, does that show you how tough the golf course is.
MICHELLE WIE:  Oh, the golf course is very tough.  There's a lot of bunkers still.  The bunkers aren't moving anywhere.  The fairways aren't getting wider.  It's a tough golf course.  It's a really good championship golf course, for sure.

Q.  You must be pleased with 1-over par?
MICHELLE WIE:  I am.  I had a lot of fun out there playing and I felt like I hit a lot of good shots.  I'm excited that I have a really good chance of not waking up at 4.00 am tomorrow, so I'm quite excited about that, too.

Q.  You probably are going to be in the mix now, or you would at least hope to be in the mix?
MICHELLE WIE:  Yeah, for sure.  I guess 3-under par leading right now.  Not sure what that's going to be at the end of the day.  But that's the only red number, and in a major, definitely gets up there.  Once you move up the leaderboard definitely gives you a chance.  So I'm really excited for 36 holes tomorrow and see what's going to happen.

Q.  Did you manage to get out and about yesterday seeing as we were winded off?
MICHELLE WIE:  I went to that Liverpool mall area.  I was really tired.  Going out to dinner, and went to a really nice restaurant, and I was like, okay, I probably should go to bed and I saw the shops, and my eyes lit up like it was Christmas morning.  And I'm like, I'm not tired anymore.  So I did some shopping, so I guess I should do that again today.

Q.  (What did you buy?)
MICHELLE WIE:  I don't want to bore you with that.  Well, if you really want to know -- you do really want to know.
A couple pair, some pants, which is nice, some jeans.  Might return one today, didn't fit.  I was too lazy to try them on, if you really want to know -- trousers.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Tomorrow, 36 holes, a bit different than a normal Sunday.
MICHELLE WIE:  Yeah, they told us yesterday.  I knew it was going to be 36 holes tomorrow.  So I've been preparing myself mentally that it's going to be a long day tomorrow and we'll see how the weather is tomorrow.
It could be like this or it could be bad.  I'm just excited that I have a chance and that I'm in the mix and that I have an opportunity and just climbed up the leaderboard, so I'm going to try to win it tomorrow.

COLIN CALLANDER:  With just 50 and ties playing, possible almost anybody in the field could win.
MICHELLE WIE:  Yeah, a bit of a shock when I got that e-mail yesterday but just got to go out there and try harder today.

COLIN CALLANDER:  Do you think it was the right thing to do?
MICHELLE WIE:  Obviously they are doing everything they can to finish by Sunday, so I mean, definitely cutting at 50 helps that.  I was a bit surprised, still, getting that e-mail yesterday, but they have to do what they have to do.

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Ricoh Women's British Open

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