Second Round Notes and Interviews from the U.S. Women's Open

Photo Credit: Scott Halleran/Getty Images

I.K. Kim during the first round.

U.S. Women’s Open conducted by the USGA
Southampton, N.Y.
Second Round Notes and Interviews
June 28, 2013

For more information visit usga.org.

***Second round play has been suspended due to fog and will resume on Saturday at 7:00 a.m. The third round will begin at 10:30 a.m.***

Inbee Park | I.K. Kim | Jodi Ewart Shadoff | Caroline Hedwall | Stacy Lewis | Ha-Neul Kim | Anna Nordqvist | Brittany Lang | Paula Creamer | Jessica Korda | So Yeon Ryu | Sun Young Yoo | Lizette Salas | Cristie Kerr | Angela Stanford | Annie Park | Brooke Henderson

Friday’s Second-Round Recap

Not even a heavy fog could stop Rolex Rankings No. 1 Inbee Park from inching closer to her third straight major title in Friday’s second round of the U.S. Women’s Open conducted by the USGA. Park fired a 4-under 68 and held the second-round lead at 9-under-par 135 at Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y. when play was suspended for the day at 6:40 p.m. ET due to heavy fog in the area.

One day after Park called the USGA “generous” for the conditions they created in round one of this week’s major championship, the 156 players in the field got a glimpse at how much more difficult Sebonack Golf Club can be when the winds pick up and the pins get tucked on the course’s tricky greens.

The wind blew steady around 15 mph for most of the day with gusts reaching 30 mph. By early evening the conditions grew worse as heavy fog moved over the course along Peconic Bay in eastern Long Island. By the time play was called for the day, only 10 players remained under par for the tournament. A total of 40 players remained on the course when play was halted due to fog and second-round play is scheduled to resume at 7 a.m. EDT on Saturday morning. Round 3 will begin at approximately 10:30 a.m. Saturday with players starting in groups of three from the first and 10th tees.

Park’s group was on the 18th hole when the fog delay was put into place. Players had the opportunity to either finish their current hole or wait until Saturday morning. Park and her playing partners, Stacy Lewis and Suzann Pettersen, continued on the par-5 18th and in true No. 1 fashion, the 24-year-old South Korean finished her impressive round with a flourish in spite of the fog by sinking a 12-foot birdie putt to complete her round of 68.

 “I think we got very lucky that we finished today,” said Park, who added that the fog made it a little harder to see on her final hole. “I played very good golf today.  I gave myself a lot of good opportunities, a very good ball striking day.  The long putts seemed to be going well today.  I left a couple out there, but very satisfied with today's score.”

Park, who won the Kraft Nabisco Championship and the Wegmans LPGA Championship earlier this year, is trying to become only the second player in LPGA history to win the first three majors in a season. Babe Zaharias accomplished the feat in 1950 when she won all three majors played that year – the Titleholders Championship, the Women’s Western Open and the U.S. Women’s Open.

Someone who could be standing in Park’s way of accomplishing that feat is fellow South Korean I.K. Kim, who sits two shots back at 7-under. Kim is a three-time winner on the LPGA Tour and certainly has the type of game to win a major championship on a golf course like this.

“I came a long way the last two days, I guess,” Kim said after her round. “When you start U.S. Open, you can't really tell what score that you are going to have.  I think that kind of helps me too.  I don't really think of the score too much.  That is going to drive you nuts, I think, if you are going to think about numbers even on any golf course.”
Numbers are what has seemed to set Park apart from the rest of the LPGA over the past year. In her last 23 events, Park has won seven times and finished runner-up five times. So in more than half of the events she’s played over that span, she’s finished first or second.

That’s why it comes as no surprise to those who have followed the LPGA Tour closely that Park once again finds herself at the top of the leaderboard. However, leading after 36 holes is a slightly less common occurrence for Park who has only done it three times over the past year with one of those times coming in her victory at the Kraft Nabisco Championship in April.

 After Thursday’s first round, Kim lauded the way that her long-time friend has been able to deliver such a dominant performance on the LPGA Tour over the past year.

I'm very proud of her,” Kim said of Park. “I've known her since we were little children, and she's a good player.  She's a great player and such a great putter.  I admire her with her putting and everything.  She's so calm.  I think she has a lot of qualities to be number 1 player. 

“Everybody's different.  We've seen many good champions over the years, and I think she's one of the better ones.  I think that's why she's been winning so many tournaments.  I mean, if she doesn't win, she finishes very close.”

Kim herself has been a consistent presence near the top of the leaderboard at major championships, particularly when it comes to the U.S. Women’s Open. She has a total of four top-10 finishes at this event, including three straight top-4 finishes from 2008-2010. But this marks the first time that she’s ever led the U.S. Women’s Open at the completion of a round.

American Lizette Salas sits in a tie for third at 4-under-par with Jodi Ewart Shadoff, who had her round halted when she was through her 15th hole of the day. Salas is in the clubhouse with the score after shooting an even-par 72 in the second round.

Saginaw, Texas native Angela Stanford used Friday’s second round to put herself in contention to capture her first major championship victory. Stanford tied Park for the low round of the day with her 4-under 68. The great round by the 35-year-old moved her up 32 spots on the leaderboard, from T37 to now T5 with fellow American Jessica Korda at 3-under-par.

A few other players were able to make a move up the leaderboard on Friday, including 2011 U.S. Women’s Open champion So Yeon Ryu. The South Korean, who turns 23 on Saturday, shot a 3-under 69 and currently sits in a tie for eighth at 2-under-par. First-round leader and KLPGA member Ha-Neul Kim fell off the pace slightly after shooting a 5-over 77 in Friday’s second round. She now sits in a tie for ninth at 1-under-par.

There’s Something About Majors: I.K. Kim is slight in stature and soft-spoken by nature but there is no question that when it comes to her performance at major championships, the 5-foot-3 South Korean packs a major punch. Although Kim is still seeking her first major victory, she seems to always be in contention when the big events roll around.

In her last 13 majors played, Kim has six top-10 finishes which includes a runner-up at the 2012 Kraft Nabisco Championship.  Her record is even more impressive at the U.S. Women’s Open where she finished T3 in 2008, T3 in 2009, T4 in 2010 and T10 in 2011. Despite missing the cut at last year’s event at Blackwolf Run, Kim acknowledges that there is something about this championship that seems to suit her game.

“Everybody has ups and downs,” Kim said. “Definitely finishing top 5 in the U.S. Open is not a bad place, you know.  But definitely, there's times that I was disappointed.  But I just have a faith, you know, if you do your best and everything is going to be okay.

“And I think especially playing USGA tournaments I've just learned so much.  I want to thank the USGA and LPGA Tour for making me a better golfer.  And competing with so many great players out here, I feel like I'm fortunate to compete against them and keep growing not only as a golfer but as a human being.”

Kim certainly has had her share of disappointments at majors as well. While many remember Kim for missing a one-foot putt on the 72nd hole of the 2012 Kraft Nabisco Championship that would have won her the tournament, those who know Kim believe it has only made her a better golfer.

“She had her tough time two years ago at the Nabisco, but I think she handled herself very good in a very positive way,” said Inbee Park of Kim. “She came back very strong, and she's a very consistent player.  Yeah, I mean, I watched her playing yesterday on TV and she was playing very solid.  I'm looking forward to playing with her.”

Lost and Found: Lizette Salas looked panicked as she ran back toward the 18th green after the completion of her round on Friday afternoon. What was causing Salas, who had shot an even-par 72 in the second round, to feel so flustered?

In the process of walking to the scoring tent, Salas had lost the scorecard on which she was keeping the score of her playing partner, Angela Stanford. As quickly looked through her golf bag for it, Salas was approached by a USGA official who delivered the missing card that a fan had picked up near the 18th green. And there appeared to be a sigh of relief for the 23-year-old’s face.

“I have never lost my scorecard,” Salas said. “I don't know how that happened.  It just kind of flew away.  I blame the wind for losing my scorecard.”

While the wind caused a slight panic moment for Salas, it didn’t derail her major championship hopes on Friday. After shooting 72, Salas finds herself in a tie for third at 4-under-par and only four shots back of leader, Inbee Park. Having already experienced the feeling of playing in the final group of a major championship at the Kraft Nabisco Championship this year, Salas continues to learn what it takes to be in contention in these big events.

“You just had to take your medicine and really try to take advantage of the par 5s,” Salas said of her round on Friday. “And I got into some trouble and had to get up and down on par 5s.  In that sense I felt like I didn't complete my goal or didn't accomplish my goal, but I still hit really good shots out there.  I'm just saving my putts for the weekend.”

Another chance? It’s been 10 years since Angela Stanford lost in a three-way, 18-hole playoff to Hilary Lunke at the 2003 U.S. Women’s Open at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club in North Plains, Ore. The now 35-year-old Texan has put herself in contention at a few majors since that fateful day but she is still seeking that first major victory.

As the years have gone on since her near-miss at the 2003 U.S. Women’s Open, has Stanford’s desire to win a major only intensified?

“Well I’m still waiting,” Stanford said. “But my answer to this question hasn’t changed. I feel very fortunate to have had that opportunity and that experience. But I’m also very fortunate that I’m still playing and still competing at U.S. Opens. Obviously, I’d love to have that trophy and I’m very blessed with where I am now. I know my time’s coming; I just don’t know when.”

Stanford has never hidden her strong desire to get that elusive major title. She’s made changes in recent year to help her on that quest. For one, she rehired Dan Chapman as her caddie who she says has been helpful with his positive nature, stemming the tide of her ability to get very negative at times during a round. She said that Chapman has also helped her to realize it’s actually good to just accept the fact that she hasn’t won a major yet.

“I think there is a level of peace right now and it's different,” Stanford said. “ I'm not as mad as I usually am.  I have a lot of great things to be thankful for, so I'm trying to enjoy this week, and I'm trying to enjoy the scenery.  I'm trying to accept things a little bit better.”

Better than anticipated? Jessica Korda admitted Friday that she didn’t know what to expect this week with her 14-year-old sister Nelly also in the field. It was the first time that the two have played together in the same U.S. Women’s Open and there would be lots of family in attendance for the big event. With so many possible distractions, Jessica said she was slightly concerned that things might not go smoothly.

However, that’s been far from the case for the 20-year-old LPGA Tour member. Jessica even finds herself in contention heading into the weekend at Sebonack as she sits at 3-under-par through 36 holes.

“It's a lot better than I thought it was going to be,” Jessica said of having her sister in the field. “ I thought it would be chaotic in the house, but it's not at all.  I think it helps that we're on opposite sides of the wave.  But it's really nice to have everybody here.  It feels really good.  It does. I know that you can't have it every week, but I'm really glad that everybody could come out this week.”

Korda shot a 1-under 71 on Friday when the wind picked up at the eastern end of Long Island and created some difficult scoring conditions.

Quotable: “I hate the wind.  I do.  And I think it's just I told my caddie yesterday because I started hitting it lower, and the ball was going farther into the wind. I said, subconsciously it just happens.  I just ‑‑ something happens that I don't know it's happening.  My body just starts doing whatever it does to make the ball go lower.  I don't like it, but I think I just know what to expect more than others” – Angela Stanford when asked if being from Texas helps her in windy conditions and makes her enjoy playing in the wind.

Tweet of the Day: “There are no words to explain how disappointed I am in myself right now...” -- @themichellewie, who 11-over-par with one hole remaining in her second round and set to miss the cut.

For more information on this week’s U.S. Women’s Open, you can visit the USGA’s official website: http://www.usga.org/ChampEventSite.aspx?id=2147487117

 

INBEE PARK

CHRISTINA LANCE:  We are here with Inbee Park, shot 6 birdies and two bogeys today en route to a 68 and an overall 9‑under 135.  Inbee, you got done before the fog came in, it's got to be a relief to be done today.
            INBEE PARK:  Yes, I think we got very lucky that we finished today.  I played very good golf today.  I gave myself a lot of good opportunities, a very good ball striking day.  The long putts seemed to be going well today.  I left a couple out there, but very satisfied with today's score.
            CHRISTINA LANCE:  If you could give us a quick rundown of your birdies and bogeys, a little detail?
            INBEE PARK:  Number 1 was 21 degree rescue to about six feet.  Number 5, hit it into the fairway bunker, hit it out and hit about 20 feet past and two‑putted.
            Number 6, I hit 8‑iron just off the green about a 30‑footer, just over a 30‑footer, made that one.
            7, I hit 7‑iron to the right and chipped it to about seven feet, missed that.
            8, I hit a sand wedge to about 15 feet, 20 feet, I made that one.
            13, what's 13?  Yeah, 13, I hit a 51 degree over the green about a 20‑footer and made that.
            15, sand wedge to about a foot.
            18 sand wedge to a 12‑footer, yeah.

            Q.  How bad was the fog, and was it affecting your putting any on 18?
INBEE PARK:  Well, I'd say it was a little tougher to play in the fog, but I made a birdie so I don't think it really came into effect for me.  I was able to see the pin on the third shot, so I think that was good enough.  Yeah, I hit the ball where I wanted to, and I was able to read the greens.

            Q.  Do you like the idea that now when your name is on top of a leaderboard, that there is an intimidation factor?  I think people say, wow, she's up there.  I don't know if we can catch her.  Do you sort of enjoy that factor?
INBEE PARK:  I think everyone would enjoy that kind of feeling where you're playing very good golf and everybody wants to play as good as you.  Yeah, I think I've been into positions where I was looking at Annika or Lorena or Yani playing so good, and trying to play like them and trying to improve myself, trying to push myself.  I think that's a good inspiration for everyone.

            Q.  I was just wondering if you could maybe talk a little bit about I.K.  She had that disappointment a couple years ago, but she's still pursuing a major.  She played pretty well this morning.  Just some of your thoughts on her game?
INBEE PARK:  Yeah, she had her tough time two years ago at the Nabisco, but I think she handled herself very good in a very positive way.  She came back very strong, and she's a very consistent player.  Yeah, I mean, I watched her playing yesterday on TV and she was playing very solid.  I'm looking forward to playing with her.

            Q.  What are your memories of that 2005 Junior Amateur against her?
INBEE PARK:  Yeah, I think I lost to I.K. in the final, but I think I was just very proud of myself that I made it to the final.  It was Match Play, and Match Play was so hard that you have to beat everyone on the way.  I think that just made me a lot stronger and hopefully this time I can play a little better.

            Q.  When you're playing in a pairing with a 1, 2, 3, but 2 and 3 aren't playing as well, is that an even quieter than usual threesome?  What was the vibe out there?  Because you were playing well and Suzann was struggling.
INBEE PARK:  I think you just get ‑‑ I think it just happens on the major tournaments where if you're not playing so well, you can shoot a lot of different numbers here.  Yeah, I mean, I think we still got quite a bit of a crowd.  We got a lot of Stacy's fans following us around today.  I had a lot of family watching me playing.  I think it was a fun day, yeah.

Q.  How would you describe that round?
INBEE PARK:  It was great.  I had hit the ball so good today.  I mean, I didn't miss many shots out there.  Gave a lot of opportunities at birdie in this kind of conditions where there was wind and fog.  Everything was very tough conditions out there to play in.
I think I really played good out there.  I mean, it really made me think today that with the wind and fog, it just really made me think.  I think that is what the U.S. Open is all about.

            Q.  (Inaudible) what happened?
INBEE PARK:  I think just a couple of bad shots on the front nine.  I mean, No. 7 on the par‑3 was in more the wind that really took that ball away.
And I mean, I didn't miss many shots out there I don't think today.  I probably left a couple of putts out there on No. 10 through 12.  But it just happens.  I got a couple back on the back nine, so it was good.

            Q.  The putt from off the green on 13, can you describe that?  What was that like?
INBEE PARK:  I think it was just giving it back to me for missing 3.  I think I just had to be away from the hole.  I mean, everything that was close from the hole was not going in, and then everything that was farther away from the hole was going in today.  It was weird.

            Q.  You had two putts today from off the green, right?
INBEE PARK:  It was a weird putting day.  I didn't make 10 or 15‑footers today, but I made 30‑footers.  That really makes up.

            Q.  How would you describe today?  There was all kinds of different conditions.  It was sunny, hot, cold?
INBEE PARK:  Kind of like four different seasons in one day.  You kind of expect it with the ocean here.  I think it's tough to play in the fog because you can't see it.  You can't see your target.  I think that was the toughest thing.  The wind, I think it was always coming in to factor this week.  Especially in the weekend it will definitely come into play, so now is a good practice.

            Q.  At what point did you get to where you couldn't see your shots come down?  16 or 17?
INBEE PARK:  On 16, I was able to see it.
And then 17, it just got a little bit very foggy and last hole was very foggy, but I see it to until about 150 yards and that was it.  I really wanted to finish today and get a good rest and be fresh for tomorrow.

            Q.  You are marching towards history.  Do you allow yourself to think about that?
INBEE PARK:  It's tough not to think about it, but I'm ‑‑ I just try to think that's not a big deal.  If I want to do it so much, it's just so tough and it puts too much pressure on you.  Try to not think about so much.

            Q.  When the fog first starts coming in, it's still a very easy thought that you'd still rather get that round over with as opposed to having to stop?
INBEE PARK:  I mean, it was just the one hole that we needed to play, so, I mean, I would definitely play it anyways.  You know what the hole looks like, you just really need to trust in yourself.

            Q.  Do you think you could have shot like 65 today with the way you were sticking ‑‑
INBEE PARK:  Yeah, I think I could have shot 65 today if my putter was really going.  Yeah, but I mean, 4‑under is I think good enough for this golf course.

 

I.K. KIM

CHRISTINA LANCE:  We're back at the 68th U.S. Open, here with I.K. Kim who had a great round today, a 69 following yesterday's 68.  Tell us how you felt out there today.
            I.K. KIM:  I felt good out there.  Typically I like afternoon tee times, but I was able to get up early and it didn't really look very nice this morning, but it turned out to be much better day.
            So that kind of helped a lot, you know.  Do you want me to go through ‑‑
            CHRISTINA LANCE:  If you wouldn't mind going through your five birdies and two bogeys for us.
            I.K. KIM:  Well, I'll start on 18.  18, I started on 18, and 18 I made birdie.  I had 70‑yard front and 90 to the pin and kind of pulled the third short.  It turned out to be a good miss, so I made a three‑feet‑putt for birdie.
            Par‑3, I was a little too aggressive and I didn't make the coming putt.
            15, par‑5, I can't remember.
            And No. 8, par‑5, I lay‑up with 5‑wood and hit wedge 68 yards and I was right on the number and made the downhill putt for birdie.
            And 7, also birdie on par‑3.  It was tough wind, but I was able to get the right number and made a tough putt.
            On 5, oh, on that pin you cannot miss to the left bunker, but I did.  I had a chance to get up‑and‑down, but luckily I made the second putt.  I think that was kind of luckiest putt I ever made.
            And 2, the birdie at 2 was huge.  Hit 7‑iron downwind and it was about 15 feet, I think, maybe 20.  I don't know.  But it was good putt to make.

            Q.  What time did you wake up and how much tougher was today than yesterday?
I.K. KIM:  Well, what time?  I got up before the alarm was off, so it always helps for me because I was kind of ‑‑ the storm was like so bad, so loud, and I always like to sleep with the open window.  So last night it was a bit of a struggle.  But I will say I got up just before 5:00.

            Q.  How much tougher was today than yesterday?
I.K. KIM:  The weather?

            Q.  The conditions?
I.K. KIM:  Oh, condition.  It was just different.  Always different from coming from afternoon to morning because ‑‑ but out here, I didn't know what to expect, but the greens are definitely softer from the rain.  But still it was really smooth, especially when you play the morning, the surface was perfect.  So I was able to make some putts.

            Q.  After that bogey yesterday on 18, just how important was it in your mind that you had to finish strong?
I.K. KIM:  What was the question?

            Q.  After your bogey on 18 yesterday, just how important in your mind was it to finish as strong as you did today?
I.K. KIM:  Yesterday I feel like I played pretty well yesterday on 18.  Whichever hole out here is not a given and I think I did pretty well.
You know, bogeying 18 is not always kind of, you know, nice way to finish the day, but I was really pleased with my round and that happens ‑‑ that can happen to anyone, you know.  That's how I kind of thought of it.
And today started on the back nine and I just feel like ‑‑ I didn't really think about No. 18 or 17 how much holes I need to play, you know.  Out here you have just got to play with everything you have and that's all you can do.

            Q.  You have had a handful of top 5s in this Open before.  What's been missing and how hungry has that made you to get that close?
I.K. KIM:  Well, I think it's just a part of the ‑‑ everybody has ups and downs.  Definitely finishing top 5 in the U.S. Open is not a bad idea.  How to say, not a bad place, you know.  But definitely, there's times that I was disappointed.  But I think, you know, I just have a faith, you know, if you do your best and everything is going to be okay.

            And I think especially playing USGA tournaments I've just learned so much.  I want to thank the USGA and LPGA Tour for making me a better golfer.  And competing with so many great players out here, I feel like I'm fortunate to compete against them and keep growing as a golfer but as a human being.

            Q.  With the conditions did you think 3‑under was even out there today?
I.K. KIM:  You know, it's really hard to project the score out here.  You just play hole by hole, maybe one shot at a time.  But, yeah, anything under par I thought was going to be a great score.
This morning didn't really look, you know, good.  It was very ‑‑ almost it was kind of sprinkling.  It turned out to be a better day and definitely more wind out there.  But greens were a little softer with the rain.  So I was able to give myself some chances.

            Q.  Yesterday it sounded like you were surprised how generous the USGA was with the setup.  What did you think leaving the course that you might come back to today?
I.K. KIM:  You know, that kind of ‑‑ I was thinking about it but the rain last night where you hear that, the lightening and the pouring rain, and I was like whatever.  I have no idea what's going to happen, you know what I mean?  I didn't even know it was going to rain or, you know, the weather, you can't really project that.
But I just try to do my best out there and just play with what they give us basically.

            Q.  As a golfer is that how your mind works?  You hear rains at night and you start thinking how the greens will be tomorrow?
I.K. KIM:  Yeah, definitely.  But there's nothing I can do what they are going to do because I'm not them.  I'm just trying to play the course that I think how I can play.  And when you can do that, I think you can score well.
But it's still a U.S. Open.  There is a lot of golf to play you never know what is going to happen.  That is the beauty of major championship, I think.

            Q.  With the different conditions today were there some clubs that didn't come out of your bag today that you wish yesterday ‑‑
I.K. KIM:  I didn't understand the question.

            Q.  Were there some clubs that you used yesterday that you just didn't bother with today because of the change of conditions?
I.K. KIM:  It played pretty much ‑‑ I mean, similar.  The wind was a little different direction and it was changing a little bit.  But overall, it just ‑‑ it didn't really surprise me.  But definitely tricky to adjust to the wind on some holes.

            Q.  You have a combined score of 7‑under.  How do you feel going forward into the remaining days of the tournament?
I.K. KIM:  Well, going forward, I came a long way the last two days, I guess.  When you start U.S. Open, you never ‑‑ you can't really tell what score that you are going to have.  I think that kind of helps me too.  I don't really think of the score too much.  That is going to drive you nuts, I think, if you are going to think about numbers even any golf course.

 

JODI EWART SHADOFF

            Q.  Tough to come back, but good to finish with a birdie, I'm sure. (No microphone)?
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  Yeah, it was tough to wake up at 4:30 this morning and to get back into it.  Parred the first hole, so it was nice to have two putts and a birdie to finish the round.

            Q.  Your position on the leaderboard is number 3.
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  Yeah, it's a good position going into the weekend.  I still have to do what I've been doing the past two rounds, and I'm happy with where my game is, so I'm going to keep that going.

            Q.  Would you say there is one aspect that's better suited to Sebonack?  Maybe putting, getting up‑and‑down?
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  No, I think the past two rounds have been hitting greens.  I really think you need to hit greens out here.  That is the main thing.  Stay patient and take the chances when you get them so.

            Q.  The tough part is waiting.  What are you going to do with your waiting time?
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  I think I'm going to go back to the house and chill and maybe take a little nap and then come back out and warm up as if it was, obviously, the first round of the weekend.

            Q.  Talk about the course today, how you felt especially compared to yesterday?
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  Yeah, the wind was in a little bit of a different direction from yesterday, and obviously a little more stronger, so it was playing a lot tougher.
They moved the tees back a little bit too, so overall the course was playing a lot harder.  But I just told myself par is good on every hole, so stay patient, and that's what I was playing for really.

            Q.  How do you feel about how you did today?
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  I did good.  Mid‑round right now, but, yeah, it's going well, and I'm staying patient.  I've had a lot of good shots today, so it's good coming into the weekend.

            Q.  Are you excited, nervous, upset to come back tomorrow and have to play your last couple of holes?
JODI EWART SHADOFF:  It is what it is.  It's not the first, and it won't be the last time that happens.  So you just have to roll with it and be patient and play your own games.

 

CAROLINE HEDWALL

Q.         You dropped a few yesterday, but you're still in the top 10.  Tell us how you feel about your position going into round three?
CAROLINE HEDWALL:  Yeah, it was a little unfortunate with that triple I had on number 4 yesterday, but I think I still played well in the end.  I mean, 3‑over with a triple, that's okay on a U.S. Open golf course.  I'm still happy I'm in the top 10, and hopefully I can play well this afternoon.

            Q.  Now with the top 10 positioning, you probably won't play till later; what will you do the rest of the day?
CAROLINE HEDWALL:  I think I'm going to go back to where I'm staying and probably take a nap, rest a little bit, and come out and warm‑up like I usually do for a round just to start it over.

            Q.  When you got here, did you still feel like you had what you had when you started the championship, do you feel like you're getting better?
CAROLINE HEDWALL:  I feel good about my game, and especially I've been putting really well.  I did struggle a little bit off the tees, but if I can try to get it on the fairways, I feel that I can give myself a lot of birdie opportunities and hopefully score low in the afternoon.

            Q.  After playing two rounds, what do you think is the one factor that's critical and the main thing that determines scoring here?
CAROLINE HEDWALL:  Putting.

 

STACY LEWIS

            STACY LEWIS:  I feel like it's not really that far off with this golf course the way it is.  It just shows it when you hit it a little off.

            Q.  How did you feel (inaudible)?
STACY LEWIS:  I mean, it definitely played harder, but I didn't think it was unfair.  If you hit good shots, you were rewarded.
The wind was certainly a factor, but the greens were still pretty soft from the rain last night.

            Q.  (Inaudible)?
STACY LEWIS:  I mean, it's really just missing the shot in the right place.  You know, No. 1, I missed it over the back.  Missed it over the back at 9, hit it in fairway bunker.  So I mean, I miss it in places where you are not going to get up‑and‑down.  That's the big thing is you can't hit it in those places.
A couple of those were just good shots that went too far, so I don't really know what to do there.  I've got to make more putts.  I've had a lot of putts the last few days.

            Q.  After two competitive rounds here, do you feel like you can make up some ground over the weekend?
STACY LEWIS:  I mean, it's hard to say.
Inbee, she's played so good the last two days that she is going to be tough to catch if you are not already under par.  I mean, I'm going to come out and try to get back under par for the week and see what I can do.

            Q.  She putts like that a lot, but it just seems like that confidence ‑‑ playing with her for a couple of rounds, it's pretty amazing to watch?
STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, I mean, it's frustrating because she is not exactly knocking the flags down.  She is making putts off the edge of the green, ones that you wouldn't expect her to make.  It's definitely frustrating for us watching.

 

HA‑NEUL KIM

            HA‑NEUL KIM:  My irons were not good and my greens in regulation, bad.

            Q.  Greens in regulations, bad.  Was that because of the wind or because of the way you played?
HA‑NEUL KIM:  The way I played.

            Q.  Were you upset about that?
HA‑NEUL KIM:  No, no, no.  I'm entered.

            Q.  Still having fun at the Women's Open?
HA‑NEUL KIM:  Yeah.

 

ANNA NORDQVIST

Q.         Lost a couple of par today, but still minus‑2 for the championship.  What were the conditions like for to you today?
ANNA NORDQVIST:  It was brutal at times.  I didn't feel like I hit a bad shot first three holes and I started bogey, bogey, bogey.
You know, it's just penalizing.  It's hard when you don't get rewarded for good shots, but that's the beauty of the game, I guess.  But I made a couple of bogeys early on, and it was just a matter of staying mentally tough and grinding it out and hanging in there.  I think I managed to make three birdies on the back nine and shoot 2‑over par for the day, which I'm very happy about.  It was tough out there.

            Q.  The U.S. Open is always about the difficulty factor, and you're only right now 5 shots off the lead and there are two rounds to play.  That's got to be something that you can say I'm near.  I can make a move; right?
ANNA NORDQVIST:  Absolutely.  It feels like the U.S. Open is all about surviving.  Surviving the first couple of days and then you never know what's going to happen over the weekend or even on Sunday.  I believe they just make it even tougher for the weekend, so I feel like I'm in a good spot.  You just keep grinding, and hope I'm there on Sunday.

 

BRITTANY LANG

Q.         I heard you made a ton of birdies out there today?
BRITTANY LANG:  Yeah, I did.  I've been hitting it great for about a month now.  So I'm seeing my shots, and I'm playing with confidence, which I haven't been.  So I don't think the course is too terribly difficult if you're hitting the ball good, just be smart on the greens.  Yesterday it played really easy.  Today, obviously, a little harder with the breeze.

            Q.  So the position you're in good for the weekend?  The outlook still good for you?
BRITTANY LANG:  Yeah, I mean, I know the scores are low, but I'm really pleased to be at plus‑1 because I know I can have a good weekend.  I'm hitting it great.
I don't know what the weather is going to do.  But just to be smart, and I'm excited to be playing.

            Q.  How about the birdies?  Did you hit it close, make long putts, what was it about?
BRITTANY LANG:  It was a little bit of both.  I hit it to about two feet on holes 1 and hole 9, so those were kick‑ins, and I made a bomb on 17.  That was quite a long putt.  Then I made another like 20‑footer and another 8, so it's kind of all over the board.

            Q.  Are you glad you played in the morning rather than in the afternoon today?
BRITTANY LANG:  Yeah, I think it's a little bit of an advantage, maybe, to have gone late early.  The course could not have played any easier yesterday for both tee times.  But as far as this breeze, it's a lot easier in the morning.

 

PAULA CREAMER

Q.         Tell us about the conditions today?  The wind has been blowing, right?
            PAULA CREAMER:  Yeah, it was.  This is kind of how this golf course should be played.  Windy and kind of gritty and all that kind of stuff.  Playing‑wise yesterday was kind of a calmer day and lower numbers, but it's hard.  There are a lot of numbers, a lot of thinking, lots of shots out there.  I'm exhausted.  I.K. has been playing so good the last few days.  You feel like you're shooting a hundred over, and I'm only 1‑over par, but she's playing really well even in these conditions.
But it's out there.  It's still out there.  If you make some putts, I just haven't really made any putts.  I've hit the ball really well.  Colin and I have done a good job with numbers and things, just not really capitalizing when I need to, but I made some good saves too.

            Q.  The pins on the chute looked a little harder, were they?
PAULA CREAMER:  Yeah, they're just more tucked in little areas.  It was a little different wind today than it was.  It's predominantly the same this way.  But it's like 8, for instance, the par‑5, it's not straight down.  Today it's more left, right and we are all the way back at the box.  So they tucked the pin behind the bunker making things a little bit more difficult.
But you can still use the ridges everywhere.  It's just knowing when to be a little more aggressive, and when not to be.

            Q.  You know, you're not that far off.  A lot can happen on the weekend.  How do you feel about it?
PAULA CREAMER:  I feel really good.  If I could make half the putts that some of these girls are making right now.  If you look at my card, I think I've had four bogeys, maybe, and three birdies, something like that.  Not a lot that's been going on my scorecard which is a good thing.  That's what U.S. Opens are all about is just maintaining and kind of grinding it out.  Hopefully, I can have a good day tomorrow and put myself somewhat in contention going into Sunday.

 

JESSICA KORDA

            Q.  (Inaudible)?
JESSICA KORDA:  I definitely think for this morning it will.  We'll see for this afternoon.  But if it keeps the conditions that they are, yeah.

            Q.  How is this week kind of different for you having Nelly here and your family.  This isn't how you travel anymore?
JESSICA KORDA:  No.  It's a lot better than I thought it was going to be.  I thought it would be chaotic in the house, but it's not at all.  I think it helps that we're on opposite sides of the wave.  But it's really nice to have everybody here.  It feels really good.  It does.
I know that you can't have it every week, but I'm really glad that everybody could come out this week.  We've got our aunts and uncles out here and our friends out here, so it means a lot that everybody came out and watch and support us this week.

            Q.  Did you talk golf at all last night?
JESSICA KORDA:  I saw Nelly for a whole 15 minutes last night before I had to go bed.  I bought her dinner and said good luck tomorrow, I'll see you some time.

            Q.  Was the course different today?
JESSICA KORDA:  It was definitely a lot different today.  It was windier, a lot of the holes played really tough.  You had to take your medicine here and there.  There were some birdie opportunities definitely.  If you took advantage of those, you could come out with a pretty good score.

            Q.  Because of that were there some clubs that didn't come out of your bag today that you used yesterday?
JESSICA KORDA:  I think a lot of the longer clubs came out of the bag today that didn't really too much yesterday.  That was one of the bigger differences.  I had driver, 5‑iron or 3‑wood, 4‑iron and stuff like that.

            Q.  What was the biggest problem the wind was causing this morning?
JESSICA KORDA:  Well, the wind switches at a certain time‑out here.  So it was just catching that and it's tough to tell yourself to take a certain line outside the fairway and hope that the wind will bring it back.  Sometimes it doesn't.  So just the gustiness of it was a little tough.

            Q.  What got you started with golf?  How did you get interested?
JESSICA KORDA:  My parents moved to Florida in '92, and my dad practiced at the (indiscernible) Academy.
When I was five years old, they actually opened a golf academy, the David Ledbetter Golf Academy.  I was trying all different kinds of sports.  My mom was like let's try this one.  I started with it, and I didn't love it at first but I had a really great coach that kind of kept me entertained through the whole thing.  And then kind of enrolled in the Academy when I was about eight or nine years old went three or four times a week.

            Q.  How long before you loved it?
JESSICA KORDA:  I think I was eight years old.  The fact I could go out and we played a lot in Czech Republic because that's where we spent most of our summers.  I got to play with my dad and play grandfather and met a lot of cool people through it.  Just the love it just grew from there.

            Q.  You and your dad go 18, who wins?
JESSICA KORDA:   He doesn't play anymore.  By the way, I win.  The last time we played, I won.  He doesn't play that much golf anymore.  His back is not that great.

            Q.  How old were you when you last played?
JESSICA KORDA:  Like actually we played when I was leaving Australia my second year, so end of ‑‑ it was the first year of January 2012.

            Q.  And you won?
JESSICA KORDA:  Of course I did.

            Q.  (Inaudible)?
JESSICA KORDA:  I don't know.  I don't remember, but I did win.  That's the most important thing.

 

SO YEON RYU

            Q.  The course seems likes it's more difficult but you had a pretty good round today?
SO YEON RYU:  You know, the two days be more windy so it's really hard to hit the second shot, especially this green is huge.  The iron shot, I mean, the second shot is really important.  Even if you are on the green, it's still really hard to make a two‑putt.
Today my iron shot was pretty great.  That's why I thought I could play well.
Also yesterday I missed a couple of tee shot and that's why I was in trouble.  Today my tee shot was pretty accurate so I'm happy with my result.

            Q.  Is the course different today from yesterday?
SO YEON RYU:  Well, I think it seems like pretty much opposite wind.  Also yesterday was like easy hole because it was helping.
Today it was into quite a bit different golf course.  But I think yesterday was quite a bit rainy.  But still green is pretty firm, so not really easy to play.

            Q.  Were there clubs that you used yesterday that never came out of your bag today?
SO YEON RYU:  Yeah, actually if I hit 9‑iron today, I hit like 6‑iron.
Yesterday if I hit the really long iron, I hit short iron.  It's kind of the opposite.  If it's totally opposite winds, it makes you confused so it's really hard to trust the yardage.

            Q.  How much does your being a champion here give you confidence at this event?
SO YEON RYU:  If I play a major tournament, I'm always afraid of it because it's major and it's a really tough golf course.
I already won the (indiscernible) Open and, oh, maybe I can handle it.  It's a really difficult golf course.  Kind of that way to confidence, so it's like proof of the experience and it really helped me a lot.
Hopefully it will really great affect to last week, the last two rounds.

            Q.  I was going to say you feel pretty good going into the weekend after the way you played today?
SO YEON RYU:  Yeah, yeah, my putting feels really great, so I'm pretty sure I can play well.
Hopefully the weather is going to be okay the Saturday and Sunday then I will try my best.

            Q.  I notice that several of the young amateurs that are out there started three, four, five years old, do they seem to be starting younger and younger?  Did you notice that?
SO YEON RYU:  Yeah, I think so.  Especially Lydia Ko is just 15 or 16 years old.  She is playing so well.
But actually, I was started playing golf when I was eight, but it seems like a lot of players started playing golf like four or five years old.  Especially they are starting with like short game, so their short game skill is really great.
So I think I have to improve my game because a lot of kids are growing up.  They are really ‑‑ it kind of scares a player.

            Q.  How did you start?  Why?  What got you interested?
SO YEON RYU:  I started playing golf at the elementary school.  I just wanted to hang out with my friends.  That's why I joined the playing golf.  Actually, at that moment I just playing golf as a hobby.
After I started to play golf five years, then it feels like golf is my destiny.  I feel so happy to play the golf.  That is why I picked the golf.  I'm pretty happy with my decision.

 

SUN YOUNG YOO

            Q.  The course seems likes it's more difficult but you had a pretty good round today?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  You know, the two days be more windy so it's really hard to hit the second shot, especially this green is huge.  The iron shot, I mean, the second shot is really important.  Even if you are on the green, it's still really hard to make a two‑putt.
Today my iron shot was pretty great.  That's why I thought I could play well.
Also yesterday I missed a couple of tee shot and that's why I was in trouble.  Today my tee shot was pretty accurate so I'm happy with my result.

            Q.  Is the course different today from yesterday?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  Well, I think it seems like pretty much opposite wind.  Also yesterday was like easy hole because it was helping.
Today it was into quite a bit different golf course.  But I think yesterday was quite a bit rainy.  But still green is pretty firm, so not really easy to play.

            Q.  Were there clubs that you used yesterday that never came out of your bag today?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  Yeah, actually if I hit 9‑iron today, I hit like 6‑iron.
Yesterday if I hit the really long iron, I hit short iron.  It's kind of the opposite.  If it's totally opposite winds, it makes you confused so it's really hard to trust the yardage.

            Q.  How much does your being a champion here give you confidence at this event?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  If I play a major tournament, I'm always afraid of it because it's major and it's a really tough golf course.
I already won the (indiscernible) Open and, oh, maybe I can handle it.  It's a really difficult golf course.  Kind of that way to confidence, so it's like proof of the experience and it really helped me a lot.
Hopefully it will really great affect to last week, the last two rounds.

            Q.  I was going to say you feel pretty good going into the weekend after the way you played today?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  Yeah, yeah, my putting feels really great, so I'm pretty sure I can play well.
Hopefully the weather is going to be okay the Saturday and Sunday then I will try my best.

            Q.  I notice that several of the young amateurs that are out there started three, four, five years old, do they seem to be starting younger and younger?  Did you notice that?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  Yeah, I think so.  Especially Lydia Ko is just 15 or 16 years old.  She is playing so well.
But actually, I was started playing golf when I was eight, but it seems like a lot of players started playing golf like four or five years old.  Especially they are starting with like short game, so their short game skill is really great.
So I think I have to improve my game because a lot of kids are growing up.  They are really ‑‑ it kind of scares a player.

            Q.  How did you start?  Why?  What got you interested?
SUN YOUNG YOO:  I started playing golf at the elementary school.  I just wanted to hang out with my friends.  That's why I joined the playing golf.  Actually, at that moment I just playing golf as a hobby.
After I started to play golf five years, then it feels like golf is my destiny.  I feel so happy to play the golf.  That is why I picked the golf.  I'm pretty happy with my decision.

 

LIZETTE SALAS

            Q.  They always say par is good at a U.S. Open.  Was par good today?
LIZETTE SALAS:  Yeah, I'm not as pleased with it just because I was striking the ball very well.  At the same time you have to look at the bright side, and you have to take into effect the wind and the weather, how it's a completely different golf course.  I was still hitting my targets and even though the putts didn't fall, I still was confident over every shot and, you know, I really wanted to make birdie on the last hole.
You just can't be too greedy out here.  Just hitting fairways, hitting greens, that was my goal.  Eventually the putts will drop.

            Q.  Has it ever happened to you before?  The scorecard disappearing like that?
LIZETTE SALAS:  No, I have never lost my scorecard.  I don't know how that happened.  I really don't know what happened there.  It just kind of flew away.  I blame the wind for losing my scorecard.
Apparently this guy had it.  Yeah, that would have not been good.

            Q.  Was he going to keep it as a souvenir?
LIZETTE SALAS:  I think so.  I think he was trying to keep it as a souvenir.  I was asking everyone and no one saw it.  And apparently some dude picked it up.

            Q.  Where did he pick it up?
LIZETTE SALAS:  I have no idea.  Probably just when I was giving the standard barren or scorer my golf ball I think I must have dropped it.  That's weird.

            Q.  What hole was that on?
LIZETTE SALAS:  The final hole, yeah.

            Q.  How did you think the course played differently today?  I heard the pins were more tucked?
LIZETTE SALAS:  Yeah, definitely a little more tucked.  You know, the ball was just not releasing as much as yesterday because of the rain, but the air was a lot heavier so you had to take a little more extra club.  It was still the same wind as yesterday but a little stronger.
But at the same time, you just had to take your medicine and really try to take advantage of the par 5s.  And I got into some trouble and had to get up and down on par 5s.  In that sense I felt like I didn't complete my goal or didn't accomplish my goal, but I still hit really good shots out there.  I'm just saving my putts for the weekend.

            Q.  You switched to the shorter putter.  How is the switch going?
LIZETTE SALAS:   The switch is good.  I switched in Hawaii and from Dallas to maybe last week, I have been going back and forth which feels good and, you know, to me it's the same stroke.  And I feel like with this Tank, the counterbalance, I feel like it's the same.  It gives me the sensation of a belly putter and I just like the way it looks, how it feels, how the ball comes off the face, you know, so what the help of that and my swing coach, it feels good.

            Q.  Who is here with you this week?  I know your folks are here.  Is it your niece and nephew?
LIZETTE SALAS:  My niece and nephew are here, mom and dad, my agent are here with me, I had Hollis Stacy (ph) come out and watch a couple of holes yesterday.
So having family here is always good.  And hearing my niece and nephew cheering me on puts a smile on my face.

            Q.  Don't you have a new addition to the family?
LIZETTE SALAS:  A week ago my brother and his wife just had a baby, so another golfer in the family hopefully.  You know, it's been a long time since we've had a baby in the family.  So we're very excited, very happy.  Hopefully by the time he's five, he should be out here.

            Q.  Speaking of that, I notice that several of the amateurs, younger kids started really, really young, is that changing?  Is it impossible to be a pro now unless you've started at a really young age?
LIZETTE SALAS:  That's a tough question.  I mean, I honestly don't think so.  You know, you hear players that start at 10, 11 years old, some that start when they start walking.  So I think it just all depends on how hard they work and how much support they have from their family or from their community.
I was a late bloomer playing amateur golf and I think it turned out just fine.
You know, you do see a lot of kids nowadays younger and younger getting that confidence and getting on that national worldwide level, more exposure, but I think that's just how it is with the technology and all the support from the fans.

            Q.  When you say the course changed so much from yesterday, are there some clubs that just never came out of your bag today?  What changes like that?
LIZETTE SALAS:  The 5‑wood didn't come out of my bag today.  You know, it just not many short irons came out of my bag today.  A lot of mid irons, long irons.  You just had to be ‑‑ take a conservative line on certain pin locations.
And you know, on 8, that tucked pin, if you are on the right side, you really had to be creative.  I hugged it on the left and used the slope to my advantage.  But you still have to use your imagination whether you have a short club our long club.

            Q.  Is that because of the wind?
LIZETTE SALAS:  I think so and the fact that it's a little softer and the ball wasn't rolling as much.

            Q.  Considering the wind is picking up this afternoon, do you ‑‑ will you take where you are on the leaderboard?
LIZETTE SALAS:  Yeah, I mean, even par is not a bad score at a U.S. Open second round, and we'll just see how the afternoon ‑‑ how the afternoon goes and Inbee and Caroline are in that afternoon wave, so we'll see what happens.

 

CRISTIE KERR

CRISTIE KERR:  I just hit it fairly close on the back and nothing went in.  A long up‑and‑down the ridge putt lipped out.  Had some trouble with four lip‑outs on the back.  Was hitting good putts, so just got to keep my head up and look forward to a good weekend.

            Q.  Everyone says even par at the U.S. Open is the way to go.  You're right there, and you agree with that, obviously?
CRISTIE KERR:  Yeah, I think scoring even with the windy conditions is a little bit better than normal.  I think they're probably going to speed the greens up, make it a little more difficult on the weekend.  Just got to keep playing the way I'm playing and have some putts fall.

            Q.  So obviously you said yesterday you need to do a little bit of work on the ball‑striking?
CRISTIE KERR:  Yeah, I hit it so much better today, and just didn't quite score.

 

ANGELA STANFORD

CHRISTINA LANCE:  We are here with Angela Stanford who today returned a 4‑under 68, six birdies, two bogeys here in her 14th U.S. Women's Open.  Angela, you looked pretty comfortable out there today.  Tell us how you felt?
            ANGELA STANFORD:  Felt good.  I hit the ball really solid.  That usually helps me, and then my putting was really good too.  So overall it just felt really good out there.
            CHRISTINA LANCE:  If you wouldn't mind walking us through those six birdies and two bogies.
            ANGELA STANFORD:  Just right off the bat, number 1, if you can ‑‑ that was my hybrid to like three feet.  If you can play the back of that green properly, you can get it close to that flag.  2, I hit it just pin‑high, probably 15, 18 feet, made that.  The bogeys on 5 and 6, I would say are caused by tee shots.  I lost ‑‑ on the fifth hole, I lost that drive in the bunker, fairway bunker.
            6, I kind of lost it right.  It was in the fairway, but funny lie.  It should have probably gone in the bunker.  So I was actually lucky to make bogey there.
            Birdie on 10.  Actually got to watch Lizette putt before me.  We were on similar lines, so I hit it to like maybe 10, 12 feet there.  11, I hit two great shots to like 25 feet, and I was happy that putt hit the back of the hole.
            14, hit, again, two solid shots, and actually had to putt up over a ridge, so that was probably 35, 40 feet, maybe, and that was a really good putt.  And once again, I kind of learned something from this Lizette's putt on that hole.
            And 15, 15, 15 ‑‑ why can't I remember 15?  Par‑5.  Oh, yeah, yeah.  Happy that putt hit the back of the hole too.  That was like 18 feet, and it was moving when it got to the hole.

            Q.  It's been ten years since you lost the playoff to Hilary Lunke; I wonder if that left you with more of a burning desire to win one of these things, and how has that gone as the years have gone on?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Well, I'm still waiting, but, you know, my answer to this question hasn't changed.  I feel very fortunate to have had that opportunity, and that experience.  But I'm also very fortunate that I'm still playing and still competing at U.S. Opens.  Obviously, I'd love to have that trophy, and I'm very blessed with where I am now, and I know my time's coming; I just don't know when.

            Q.  You referenced it a little bit, not that 30‑something is very old, but with everybody in this game and everybody around you, there are so many young players coming up.  How difficult is that to try to stave these girls off and get your piece of the pie, so to speak?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I'm trying to be smarter.  But these younger kids now, I mean, they hit the ball farther; they are more mature and they are smarter about the game.  They're just a lot better than when I was 18 to 22.  But I still have a passion for the game, and I think that's what helps me hang around these kids.  I still love playing just got a few more years on them.

            Q.  You were really able to keep your head after those two bogeys on the front nine.  Can you just talk about how big it was to just kind of keep your head going into the back nine?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Well, like I said, I learned a very quick lesson from yesterday.  When I turned yesterday, I missed kind of a short putt on 18, and I let it bother me and doubled the 1st and bogeyed the 2nd.  I don't think I ever really recovered from that.  I kind of fought it the rest of the way.  So I kind of told myself today to knock it off and don't make the same mistake.  I've already done it once.
It was still going to be a long day.  I mean, we had only played six holes, so I had to kind of get back in it.  So I think yesterday really helped today.

            Q.  When you first came here, did you like this place?  Did it suit your eye immediately or did it take some warming up?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I really like it.  The very first time a couple years ago I remember thinking when I left I loved this place.  But if the USGA has its way here, we could all look very foolish.
I think they've been generous so far.  This course could get a lot harder.  So I love it.  I love just visually it's beautiful.  You have to hit different shots.  I'm not crazy about the greens, but I don't know.  I told my dad on the phone, I'm like, Dad, I shouldn't like a place like this.  It seems to be very linksy, and I'm not into linksy type courses.  But for some reason, I don't know, maybe it's the big American flag flying up there, but I love it.  There is just something about it that is really cool.

            Q.  All players from Texas are supposed to be good wind players.  Do you like it when it starts to blow like this?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I love this question.  I hate the wind.  I do.  And I think it's just I told my caddie yesterday because I started hitting it lower, and the ball was going farther into the wind.
I said, subconsciously it just happens.  I just ‑‑ something happens that I don't know it's happening.  My body just starts doing whatever it does to make the ball go lower.  I don't like it, but I think I just know what to expect more than others.

            Q.  How do you keep yourself from wanting this too much and trying too hard?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Well, I ‑‑ you know, my caddie said something to me last week because we were talking about another event, and he said something that's made a world of difference.  We talk about ‑‑ I mean, he's great when it comes to holding me accountable for ‑‑ you know, I get really negative and he's really positive.  And he's like, you know, you've just got to pray for acceptance.  And I was like, whoa.  I didn't see that one coming.
Like I just need to accept certain things, and I think I've been very upset that I haven't won a major.  I think that it's just I need to accept some things.  Like I was saying earlier, I'm very fortunate to still be playing.
So I think there is a level of peace right now and it's different.  I'm not as mad as I usually am.  I have a lot of great things to be thankful for, so I'm trying to enjoy this week, and I'm trying to enjoy the scenery.  But I'm trying to accept things a little bit better.
CHRISTINA LANCE:  Well, you've got a great mindset and a great round today.  Thank you so much.

            ANGELA STANFORD:  Thanks.

            Q.  It looked to everyone else like the course is playing harder today.  How did you manage a 68?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I have no idea.  I knew going in this morning it was going to be tougher.  I think yesterday was probably the easiest day that the USGA and the golf course is going to give us.  I knew this morning it was going to be tough.  It's probably just going to be get tougher.

            Q.  What was the biggest difference from yesterday to today as far as pin placement or wind, whatever?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I think more wind today.  I think it was probably blow ago touch harder.  The greens I thought were still pretty quick.  I thought they were kind of slow yesterday just because you expect them to come off the ridges and they really we weren't yesterday in certain spots.
So I thought today they were a little bit faster.  I don't know if that's wind or if they sped them up.  I don't know.

            Q.  Did you surprise yourself a little with a 68?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Yeah.

            Q.  What's a good score today?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I think if you can get it under par it's good today.  There are some tricky pin placements.  I like to call them sucker pins.  They look like they would be good to go at but they are not.  If the wind keeps doing this anything under par would be good.

            Q.  What would be an example of a sucker pin today?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I thought 4 was; it's kind of tucked on the left front.

            Q.  You started off with those two birdies then you came back strong on the back nine.  Take us through that.
ANGELA STANFORD:  Well, I learned a quick lesson from yesterday.  You know, I left here upset last night because I kind of ‑‑ I lost it mentally when I missed the short birdie putt on 18 to turn, then I doubled 1 and bogeyed 2.
I was extremely impatient and just really upset when I left last night.  Then that happened on 5 and 6, I just kind of told myself don't do this again.  Pull it together and get a par and let's start again.

            Q.  Does this course require patience maybe more so than most?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Yeah, and people like to say I'm not very patient.  So happy to be standing here.

            Q.  You played a lot of Opens and you know that and yet you still have to relearn that lesson, if you will?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Because I'm not patient.  But you know, at least I'm learning.  I recognized yesterday that it was the easiest as the course is going to play.  I think that was part of the reason I was upset when I left.  I feel like I missed out on an opportunity.  Just makes it harder the rest of the week.

            Q.  You had two really good finishes obviously ten years ago and then 4th a couple years ago.  Do you still feel you have the ability to win this U.S. Open?
ANGELA STANFORD:  I like to think so, yeah.  But the longer I do this, the more there is an element of luck that plays into it.  And I've seen a little bit so far.  That doesn't mean I'm going to be lucky the next couple of days.  But a couple of those putts that went in on the back, if they hadn't have hit the hole, I would have had 5 or 6 feet coming back.  A bounce here, a bounce there, there is an element of luck.

            Q.  After you thought the course played easy yesterday, you were at 1‑over, how much did you have to convince yourself that you were still in it?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Well, I'm very thankful for friends and family.  They tend to believe in you sometimes when maybe you lack a little.  So just talking to friends and family, they kind of kick you in the butt a little bit and ‑‑

            Q.  Are they here with you this week?
ANGELA STANFORD:  My mom is here.  Mom is here and just talking on the phone.

            Q.  When you are not a patient person by natural personality, what are the things you do to calm yourself down or slow down a little bit?
ANGELA STANFORD:  My poor caddie takes the brunt of it.  He hears a lot of the negativity.  And so when you see him walking way out in front of me, it's probably because I'm just letting it go verbally and he doesn't want to hear it anymore.

 

ANNIE PARK

Q.  Can you tell us how you felt on the front nine?  You hit great shot after great shot.  You hit four birdie putts and just couldn't get it to go in.
            ANNIE PARK:  Compared to yesterday, I definitely played better.  It was still frustrating that I just couldn't make any putts, especially like short putts for birdie.  Mentally it was frustrating.  I knew that I could make more putts.  It just didn't drop.

            Q.  (Inaudible) the approach at 14 and the tee shot at 17?
ANNIE PARK:  Yeah, I mean, I feel like I'm not at my best with my ball striking right now, but today it was better than yesterday.  And I tried to ‑‑ I held it together.  I mean, I did hit some great shots.  I just feel like I could have hit more great shots with my swing feeling good.

            Q.  What do you take out of these two days?
ANNIE PARK:  It was a great experience.  It was just unbelievable with the fans just coming out to support not only our group but just coming out for the other players.  I mean, it just seems so nice not only to see it so popular in the men's Tour but also in the LPGA Tour.

            Q.  What do you learn personally for your game out of these two days?
ANNIE PARK:  I mean, it was definitely not my best from the past two days when I do ‑‑ I feel like I can, you know, be at the top.

            Q.  How did the setup feel compared to the times you played it just playing near here?
ANNIE PARK:  So last year, the yardages were obviously shorter.  So it was like playing a different golf course with the tees back.  I'm still not used to like No. 1 ‑‑ No. 1 being No. 2, No. 9 being No. 1.  So I mean, that was kind of like confusing.
But I mean, overall, it was just a great setup.  And the greens were rolling pretty good too.

            Q.  When you came out today, did you have a particular goal or what did you think you had to do to make the cut?
ANNIE PARK:  I was ready to go out and just play.  I mean, personally I know that, you know, once I have a bad round or a bad front nine, I mean, I'm usually back on track getting it back to even, but today it was ‑‑ I was hitting it good, it was just my putts.  I was giving my best efforts and it didn't drop in.  I can't do anything about it.

            Q.  It seemed like a lot of putts went left.  Did you notice that at all that you pulled a few?
ANNIE PARK:  I think the ones that I pulled ‑‑ it was ones I missed my putt right, I tried to miss it left.  And then I don't know.  I don't know.

            Q.  Two years in a row you have been in it.  What does it do for your hunger to be in the U.S. Open, your enthusiasm for the U.S. Open, where does that stand right now?
ANNIE PARK:  I mean, even if I just played the last few days, I'm honored to be on the tee and hitting balls or shots on this great golf course.  I mean, it would be nice to be able to play every year, but we'll see.

            Q.  What does the rest of the summer look for you?
ANNIE PARK:  So I actually start summer classes in two days.  And I have two amateur tournaments, the North and the South, and the Women's Am.  I will be pretty much preparing for that as well.

            Q.  When you think back to six months ago, you were finishing up high school, how far do you feel you have come in these past six months?
ANNIE PARK:  I mean, my goal was to, you know, accomplish some goals that I had beginning this past semester and I mean, I've accomplished more than I expected and I feel just great and honored to be part of it.

            Q.  When you look at yourself and you compare yourself to some of the good players today, if your putter had cooperated today you might have had one of the best rounds out here?
ANNIE PARK:  I believe so.  I mean, if those putts dropped, I would have at least been 3‑ or 4‑under easily.  But I mean, it's golf.

            Q.  What does that tell you about where you stand next to these women?
ANNIE PARK:  I mean, obviously they are all great players.  And if I ‑‑ after today and yesterday, I've noticed that, you know, I still have a long way to go and to learn a lot from my coachers and I'm just going to prepare myself for the professional Tour.

            Q.  Do you like the way you held up mentally?  You kept hitting good shots and hitting it close?
ANNIE PARK:  Yes, I mean, I start to get used to, you know, the pressure and all the attention.  But I mean, I just hit one shot at a time and just ‑‑ it was definitely frustrating.  I just couldn't get over the putts that I missed.  But, I mean, you just learn from them.

            Q.  When you look back, what do you think will be the biggest thing staring back at you in your game and what you need to do to prepare to compete on this level?
ANNIE PARK:  I feel like I should ‑‑ I have a lot more to experience bigger tournaments, obviously this is one of the biggest, but just playing against the pros, the best, and just handling pressure, learning ways of how to handle those pressures, even though I know a few.  But there is still a lot more to learn.

 

BROOKE HENDERSON

Q.         How you doing?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  All right.

            Q.  Can you sum up the day for yourself?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  I missed a lot (Indiscernible); I made one birdie, so that was a huge factor.  I three‑putted twice so putter wasn't working as well as I wanted it to, but I still had some good holes in there.  At times I felt good, but bogey on the last doesn't help.

            Q.  What happened on the last?  You looked like you were in pretty good shape?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Yeah, it just was faster than I thought.  Just a little down at the end, and it (No Audio).

            Q.  Were you trying to be safe there though, or were you looking at a birdie at that point?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  I wouldn't have minded a birdie, but par was sort of ‑‑

            Q.  Overall, where you sit right now, don't know whether you're in or not, but are you sort of happy with where you're at right now?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  I wish I had played a little better today.  That would have helped a lot.  But I have a chance to make the cut and that was my goal.

            Q.  Was it a tough stretch after you started off good?  You had some pars and then you ran into some sand trouble?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Yeah, I had a couple of wrong club choices there that got me into trouble.  Still the sand traps weren't too difficult but just didn't get up‑and‑down.

            Q.  You looked like you were having fun though even when stuff was going bad there you and Brittany were having fun a couple times like on the second tee and stuff.  It was fun?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Yeah, yeah, definitely it's a lot of fun out there.  It's a beautiful golf course, and it's just a pleasure to be out here, so it's good.

            Q.  Was there an ongoing joke or was it something ‑‑ like it was on the second tee?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Yeah, I don't know.  There are a few things going on.

            Q.  Funny faces in the crowd or anything?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  No, no, none of that.

            Q.  Just the whole start time today, getting up, what time did you get up?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  5:00.

            Q.  Was that tough or did you bounce right out of bed?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  It wasn't too bad.  I've had some early tee times the last month or so, so I'm getting used to it.  But we're done pretty early now.  What time is it?

            Q.  It's like noon, I think?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Yeah, it's perfect, get some practice in.

            Q.  Are you going to practice?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Oh, I'll practice for a little bit.

            Q.  Do you have to get something to eat, I guess, in your system?
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Yeah, I had breakfast this morning.

            Q.  Okay.
BROOKE HENDERSON:  Then I just tried to eat throughout the round.

Topics: Notes and Interviews, US Women's Open

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