RICOH Women's British Open Third Round Notes and Interviews

Inbee Park
Photo Credit: Richard Martin-Roberts/Getty Images

Inbee Park of South Korea poses with a cake to celebrate her 26th Birthday during the third round of the Ricoh Women's British Open at Royal Birkdale on July 12, 2014 in Southport, England.

RICOH Women’s British Open
Royal Birkdale Golf Club
Southport, England
Third Round Notes
July 12, 2014

Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 3, -4
Suzann Pettersen, Rolex Rankings No. 4, -3
Sun Ju Ahn, Rolex Rankings No. 21, -3
Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 1, -1
Charley Hull, Rolex Rankings No. 32, -1

Inbee Park celebrated her 26th birthday on Saturday at Royal Birkdale and she gave herself the best birthday present ever – the lead heading into the final round of the RICOH Women’s British Open. Park fired a 4-under 68 in Saturday’s third round to finish at 4-under-par and take a one-shot lead with 18 holes remaining.

“I still left a couple ot out there but a very good ball‑striking day,” Park said of her performance. “Today gave me a lot of confidence going into tomorrow because the first two days I didn’t feel like my ball‑striking was there enough, but today gave me confidence going into tomorrow.”

It had appeared that Sun Ju Ahn, who competes on the LPGA of Japan Tour, would be the third-round leader when she finished with a par on the 18th hole and sat at 5-under-par overall. But prior to signing her scorecard, Ahn was assessed a two-shot penalty for building a stance in the bunker in front of the 18th green (see statement below). The penalty dropped her from the lead into a tie for second at 3-under-par with Suzann Pettersen and Shanshan Feng.

“It’s disappointing but it’s my mistake and something that I have to follow the rules of the game,” Ahn said afterward. “I still have a day to go and I have to stay focused and try my best tomorrow.”

Ahn will be seeking her first LPGA victory while Park will be chasing one of the biggest accomplishments in golf. It was just a year ago that Park captured the attention of the golf world when she won the first three majors of the LPGA season and had the chance to become the first player – male or female -- in the modern era to capture a grand slam. Now she will have a chance to complete the career grand slam by adding a RICOH Women’s British Open title to her resumé.

“I feel like this tournament owes me one.” Park said with a laugh.

But to do so, Park will have to outlast a number of other players who sit just a few shots back including the only two players to win a major in 2013 besides Park – Stacy Lewis and Pettersen. Lewis, who sits at 1-under through 54 holes, captured her second career major at the RICOH Women’s British Open at St. Andrews last year while Pettersen
captured her second major at the Evian Championship.

STATEMENT FROM LGU TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR SUSAN SIMPSON
Rule 13-3 states that a player is entitled to place her feet firmly in taking her stance, but she must not build a stance.

In the bunker she moved the sand with her feet and breached this rule. You may refer to decision 13- 3/3

She viewed the TV coverage of the incident and graciously accepted a two shot penalty.

CHASING HISTORY
Last year, Inbee Park came to the RICOH Women’s British Open trying to become the first player in the modern era to capture a grand slam in a single season. One year later, Park is now trying to achieve another impressive feat at this major championship – a career grand slam.

Park, who holds the 54-hole lead at the RICOH Women’s British Open, will try to become the seventh player in LPGA history to reach this major accomplishment. Park won the 2008 U.S. Women’s Open as a 19-year-old and then won three majors last year (the Kraft Nabisco Champions, the Wegmans LPGA Championship and the U.S. Women’s Open).

Other players to achieve a career grand slam & when they achieved it:

PLAYER DATE

TOURNAMENT TO COMPLETE
CAREER GRAND SLAM

Louise Suggs June 9, 1957 LPGA Championship
Mickey Wright May 13, 1962 Western Open
Pat Bradley June 1, 1986 LPGA Championship
Juli Inkster June 27, 1999 McDonald's LPGA Championship
Karrie Webb June 24, 2001 McDonald's LPGA Championship
  Aug. 11, 2002 Weetabix Women’s British Open
Annika Sorenstam Aug. 3, 2003 Weetabix Women’s British Open

http://www.lpga.com/golf/news/grand-slam.aspx

FINISH WITH A FLURRY
There has been a lot of talk this week about the back-to-back par-5 finishing holes at Royal Birkdale. On a course where the rough can be so penalizing and the fairways are narrow, there are plenty of chances where a player can find trouble. But the par-5 finishing holes on 17 and 18 have proven that this championship likely won’t be decided until the very end.

Suzann Pettersen’s hot finish was a perfect example of that in Saturday’s third round. After making two bogeys in a stretch of three holes from 13-15, Pettersen managed to work her way right back up the leaderboard with an eagle-birdie finish to move into a tie for second at 3-under-par.

“It’s always a very nice finish,” Pettersen said. “I’ve been playing really well for three days now. I mean, you can’t blame yourself if you don’t shoot under par on this course. Par is a great score but conditions have been so good so you just really have to try and take advantage.”

And Pettersen wasn’t the only player who was looking at those final holes as a chance to make up ground if needed.

“You can make a double so quick on this golf course,” Stacy Lewis said. “You need to just keep hanging in there. If you get in trouble – get out and stay patient. If you make a bogey, it’s okay because you have some par 5 finishing holes here.”

MAJOR RECOVERY
The majors haven’t been particularly kind to Suzann Pettersen this season. The 33-year-old Norwegian had to
withdraw from the Kraft Nabisco Championship in April due to a back injury and she missed the cut at last month’s U.S. Women’s Open at Pinehurst.

But while her back injury has hampered her at times throughout the year, Pettersen finally seems to be at a point where her game is coming together and it seems to be doing so at the right time. Pettersen shot a 4-under 68 in
Saturday’s third round of the RICOH Women’s British Open to move into a tie for second at 3-under-par.

“It’s dreadful when you don’t get to play golf and when you miss the big tournaments that you live and die for, it’s even more painful,” Pettersen said. “I’ve been pretty good now since the U.S. Open and I’m looking forward and I’m in good shape and I have no worries.”

Pettersen, who won the final major of the 2013 season at the Evian Championship, said that with her back feeling
better she has been able to get her game together as well. At the Walmart NW Arkansas Championship two weeks ago, Pettersen finished in a tie for sixth and felt that things in her game were finally coming around.

“Arkansas two weeks ago is when I started to feel good,” Pettersen said. “It’s been a tough year for me but now I have no pain and I’m looking forward. I’m in a good place and I’m feeling good with my game so fun to be out there and I’m really enjoying this golf course.”

RIGHT WHERE SHE WANTS THEM
Stacy Lewis enters the final round of the 2014 RICOH Women’s British Open in the exact position she would like to be in. She trails leader Inbee Park (-4) by three strokes heading into her favorite day of the week.

“I love Sundays.” Lewis said. “You know, that’s the day that I play for. When I have that chance to win so that’s where I love to be and I think when you love to be there, it’s that much easier.”

Lewis’ overall final round scoring average is 68.07, while her final round average when she enters the day trailing is 68.25 which proves what a strong competitor she is.

Forcasts for Sunday at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club call for some rain showers in the morning which could make for some tough conditions out there on the course. Those conditions make the World No. 1 player like her position even more.

“It’s going to be one much those tough days and just hang in there.“ Lewis said. “But I like coming from behind versus having the lead. I think the lead’s harder when those conditions get hard.”

AN AGGRESIVE PLAYER
It’s moving day at the RICOH Women’s British Open and Charley Hull made one of the biggest moves of them all today. The 18-year old fired a 66 to move up to 1-under par and from 49th to start the day to a T-7th heading into the final round.

Her aggresive play and the fact she mixed in nine birdies, including twos on each of the four par-3’s helped her to get back in the tournament, just as she predicted the night before to her dad.

“I said I’m not out of this championship.” Hull recalled of the conversation. “I said to my dad: I can still win it if I have a good day tomorrow. If the wind gets up tomorrow (Sunday), it even par could win it.”

There was a moment today during the press conference immediately following her round today, when she was asked if she ever doesn’t play aggresively.

“Well, I don’t know.” Hull said. “I don’t realise that I play aggressive golf but I probably do. But I suppose I do sometimes. I just hit it. If it’s a stupid pin, I’m not going to take it on, but if it’s reasonable, I just go for it.”

At the end of the day, Hull felt like this round and performance was right up there with the best of her short career thus far.

“Yeah, it’s probably up there, in front of the home crowd.” Hull said. “One of the best. I don’t know where it ranks, but yeah.”

NO. 1 SCENARIOS
Stacy Lewis will remain the Rolex Rankings No. 1 player if she finishes in a 3-way tie for 2nd-or-better at the RICOH Women’s British Open. If Lydia Ko wins this week, she will take over the No. 1 ranking as long as Stacy finishes in a 4-way tie for 2nd or worse.

FIRST QUOTE OF THE DAY
“Especially being in front of the home crowd, I felt like I had a bit of pressure on me coming into the beginning of this week, especially with RICOH, my sponsor, people are expecting a lot of me, and I feel like I kind of stepped up there today and really proved myself. It was great to have a good crowd out there as well.”
-Charley Hull explaining how she felt about her performance in Rd. 3 of the RICOH Women’s British Open

ANOTHER QUOTE OF THE DAY
“There’s definitely a little bit of wanting to try and win all five majors by the time my career is over. And I feel like my game is suitable for all different courses. You’ve just really got to adjust and play smart and adjust accordingly.”
-Suzann Pettersen on her strong desire to win the RICOH Women’s British Open

TV SCHEDULE
ESPN2 will be televising the tournament this week in the United States. Below is the air time for the final round of the RICOH Women’s British Open.

July 13 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

*All times listed are U.S. Eastern time

FIRST HOLE PROBLEMS
There were just six double-bogeys or worse on the first hole during Rd. 3, compared to the 15 during Rd. 2 yesterday and 23 during Rd. 1.

EAGLES FOR A CAUSE
“Wounded Warrior Project® Weekends” is a season-long charity program that will be tied into the Race to the CME Globe. Each Saturday and Sunday at LPGA tournaments, CME Group will donate $1,000 to Wounded Warrior Project® for each eagle that is recorded. This amount will increase to $5,000 for each eagle during the weekend of the CME Group Tour Championship and a formal check will be presented to the Wounded Warrior Project® during the trophy ceremony at the CME Group Tour Championship.

Today, five total eagles were recorded which brings the total money raised this year to $189,000. Through the first 16
tournaments prior to RICOH Women’s British Open, $184,000 had been raised.

 

Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 3, -4

INBEE PARK:  Yeah, having in a good of a start here, you can't mess it up here.  The first four holes are toughest.  Yeah, the I still left a couple out there but a very good ball‑striking day.  Today gave me a lot of confidence going into tomorrow because the first two days I didn't feel like my ball‑striking was there enough, but today gave me confidence going into tomorrow.

COLIN CALLANDER:   You said the other day your ball striking this season has been very good and the putting has been letting you down a little bit.  Has it improved as the week has gone on?
INBEE PARK:
  It felt like it has improved a little bit.  The last couple tournaments I had, I didn't really putt well but this tournament ‑‑ I'm also missing short ones but I'm also holing ten‑, 15‑footers.  So just trying to avoid 3‑putting tomorrow and I'm in good shape.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  Are you using same putter as last year?
INBEE PARK: 
No, different putter.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  So what did you do with the old one?
INBEE PARK:
  It's at home.  I like to try different putters when it's not working, refresh my mind.  Nothing's wrong with the putter but it has been a struggle this year with the putter.  So, yeah, I just wanted to have something new and fresh.

Q.  Has that one putter won all three majors?
INBEE PARK: 
Yes.  Should I go back to that putter?  (Laughter).

Q.  What's the secret to scoring well around here?
INBEE PARK: 
I think you just have to start it well.  Don't lose too many shots on the first four holes, five holes.  If you're 1‑over par through four or five it's okay because you have opportunities coming up on the finishing holes.
           
But obviously I got off to a better start today and playing the par 5s, you have to take advantage of the par 5s here and not be in too many fairway bunkers.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  Can we go over the details?
INBEE PARK:
  The first, I hit 7‑iron into about 15 feet.
           
No. 2 was 8‑iron about 15 feet.
           
4 was 6‑iron to about another 15 feet.
           
6 was six‑foot.
           
8 was 3‑putt from 15 foot.
           
12 was like 30‑footer with an 8‑iron.
           
14 was 8‑iron, 3‑putt from maybe 30‑footer.
           
17 was about five feet, four feet, made that one.

Q.  Charley Hull had four 2s today?
INBEE PARK: 
Really.

Q.  When was the last time you birdied all the short holes?
INBEE PARK: 
I don't know if I've ever done that before.  I really can't remember last time I did it.  I remember doing three of them but I don't remember four of them.  I had two today.

Q.  Can you talk about coming in here under the radar; is that strange to you, given all of the experience last year, that the spotlight has shifted considerably this year?
INBEE PARK: 
It's somewhat weird, awkward, but I didn't mind that.  I didn't mean having three days feel like this is a normal tournament.  I didn't have much pressure.  Really just try to play my own golf.  Yeah, I start to feel a little bit of pressure from now and tomorrow, but I'd rather be having the pressure than not being in contention.

Q.  Along the same lines, have you enjoyed this year more than last year, would you say?
INBEE PARK:
  At this tournament ‑‑ I definitely enjoyed it last year as well but this year has just been a little bit different to last year.
           
Last year I enjoyed it and having pressure and experiencing something I never have experienced before.  It's really different.  If I end up winning tomorrow, I definitely enjoy this year better.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  You got unlucky with the weather last year whereas this year ‑‑
INBEE PARK:
  It's just really consistent this year.  Morning, afternoon, didn't really matter this year.

Q.  You said you could see improvements in your game and I know putting has been off this year, but can you just expand on what has improved?
INBEE PARK:
  My swing is just getting more consistent and hitting the ball a lot better.  Obviously I got a lot of confidence from my ball‑striking last year.  Everything is just maturing and having a lot of experience, it really helps me going through on the golf course.
           
And yeah, I have been in different positions of winning last year, and this year, when I have an opportunity and when I know I have an opportunity ‑‑ yeah, I think I'm a little more mature player than I am last year.


Suzann Pettersen, Rolex Rankings No. 4, -3

Q.  A real turnaround in this championship so far and very much in the thick of things.
SUZANN PETTERSEN: 
Yeah, it's nice.  I've been playing really well for a few days.  It's just hard to kind of get going because it's easy to make one little mistake and takes you right back into the toughness of the course.  I'm really enjoying this course.  First time I really feel it ‑‑ just really trying to build the round as I go.
           
Who knows what the weather is going to give us tomorrow, but from what I've seen, it's supposed to be nice towards the afternoon so give myself a later tee time might be a good thing.

Q.  Three birdies going out and some dropped shots and you got them both back at 17th with the wonderful eagle?
SUZANN PETTERSEN: 
There are some holes where par is a great score and 13 is one of them.  Unfortunately I had a 3‑putt to bogey.  It's not like it was a disaster or bad shot or anything.  Felt really in good shape, hitting the ball great, confident over the putter.  So hope I can take it into tomorrow.

Q.  Been a difficult year for you because I know you've had back problems and you had to miss the first major of the year and missed the cut at the Women's Open; is there a chance to make up for lost time?
SUZANN PETTERSEN:
  I'm sure that's how you feel and it's dreadful when you don't get to play golf and when you miss the big tournaments that you live and die for, it's even more painful.  I've been pretty good now since the U.S. Open and I'm looking forward and I'm in good shape and I have no worries.

Q.  This is the major that you had until last year fared least well in, and having major victories in America and France, almost the Phil Mickelson thing, that you want to become a complete golfer by winning on links.  Is there a little of that in you?
SUZANN PETTERSEN: 
There's definitely a little bit of wanting to try and win all five majors by the time my career is over.  And I feel like my game is suitable for all different courses.  You've just really got to adjust and play smart and adjust accordingly.
          
Yeah, I'm right where I want to be for tomorrow but who knows, I'll go out tomorrow and give it my all but at the same time play smart.

Q.  We always knew that there could be a fast finish on this golf course with three par 5s in the last four holes, and eagle, birdie for you; how crucial was that?
SUZANN PETTERSEN:
  It's always a very nice finish.  I've been playing really well for three days now.  I mean, you can't blame yourself if you don't shoot under par on this course.  Par is a great score but conditions have been so good so you just really have to try and take advantage.
           
Got on a nice run and had a couple of hiccups mostly on putting to be honest but finished strong with eagle and birdie.  I'm right in the mix of where I want to be tomorrow.  Who knows what the weather wants to give us, but it's been lovely so far.

Q.  David Leadbetter was really singing your praises and felt like you could have a very good week here at Royal Birkdale.  Was there a feeling coming in that you were starting to peak?
SUZANN PETTERSEN:
  Yeah, Arkansas two weeks ago is when I started to feel good.  It's been a tough year for me but now I have no pain and I'm looking forward.  I'm in a good place and I'm feeling good with my game so fun to be out there and I'm really enjoying this golf course.

Q.  Looking ahead to tomorrow, so many things can happen and so many things can change on this golf course, double‑bogeys, eagles; does that change the mind‑set that maybe you'd be keeping an eye on other people tomorrow and just play your own game?
SUZANN PETTERSEN:
  Around this track, you have more than enough to take care of the tee shots and approach shots.  Even the middle of the fairway, you can easily hit a sloppy second and put yourself in an awkward spot, so you just cannot go anywhere but being in the present.  Right off the bat, you're tested with a pretty nice tee shot there on No. 1.


Sun Ju Ahn, Rolex Rankings No. 21, -3

Q.  The decision has been made that there is going to be a two‑shot penalty; it's unfortunate but it's part of the day.
SUN JU AHN
:  Yeah, it's disappointing but it's my mistake and something that I have to follow the rules of the game.  I still have a day to go and I have to stay focused and try any best tomorrow.

Q.  I know there was no intent, but do you understand the rule and did you understand the rule when you were in the process of it?
SUN JU AHN:
  Yeah, I didn't know about the rule but all I was trying to do was make a stance.  I'm surprised by it but if that's the rule, I just have to abide by it and just refocus.

Q.  Can you take us through what happened on 18 in your opinion?
SUN JU AHN:
  You know, the ball was placed on a very upslope lie, so it was hard to make a stance.  So what I was trying to do was fix a stance but after the review it was determined that I used my feet to try to make an even lie.  But you know, my intent wasn't to break the rules.  It was just to set my feet firm in the sand just to be able to make the shot.  But if that's the rule, there was no intent and I can't do anything about it.

Q.  Do you feel it's a little unfair?
SUN JU AHN:
  I mean, it's the rules.  I'm a player and I have to abide by the rules.  So I can't say it would be ‑‑ it would be unfair for me to say it's unfair.  But the truth is that I was trying to, the intent was to make a stance, not break the rules.  I just have to abide by the rules.

Q.  Does it give you motivation now for tomorrow?
SUN JU AHN: 
I'll have to sleep over it and find out tomorrow morning whether it's going to motivate me or not.  All I can do is do my best.  I know I'm not that far off, still in the game, so we'll just have to see tomorrow.

Q.  And nothing like this has happened to you before?
SUN JU AHN:
  No, this is the first time.

 


Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 1, -1

Q.        Is it fair to say another day where you hit well and played well but it didn't quite come off?
STACY LEWIS:
  Today was another frustrating day.  Today was probably the most scorable day we had all week.  Hit the ball great and gave myself a lot of chances.  I didn't make anything on the greens.  Chipped a little better but just didn't make any putts.

Q.  How do you sum up your position after three rounds considering all of that?
STACY LEWIS: 
Yeah, I think that's where I've gotten over the last few years is that I can maybe struggle a few days and still hang in there and still give myself a chance to win.  That's what I did today.  I went out and at least made a few birdies there coming in to give myself a chance to win tomorrow.  That's the goal every week.
           
So we'll just see what happens with the weather.  I think it's going to be a pretty tough day and just got to hang in there.

Q.  Expecting a bit of weather tomorrow; hanging in there could pay dividends because anything could happen?
STACY LEWIS:
  Oh, yeah, you can make a double so quick on this golf course that you've just got to keep hanging in there.  If you get in trouble, get out, and just stay patient.  If you make a bogey, it's okay, because you've got some par 5 finishing holes here.
           
So it's going to be one much those tough days and just hang in there.  But I like coming from behind versus having the lead.  I think the lead's harder when those conditions get hard.

Q.  So going into tomorrow, is it hopeful or confident?
STACY LEWIS:
  I'm hopeful.  I would have liked to have been a couple more under par.  But you know, you can't make 'em all.


Charley Hull, Rolex Rankings No. 32, -1

COLIN CALLANDER:   Good afternoon, we have Charley Hull with us.  She just fired a 66 to move up to 1‑under par from tied 51 to Top‑10 as we stand at the moment. Great round of golf.  Can you give us general thoughts on the round.
CHARLEY HULL:
  I started off with two bogeys today.  But went deep and birdied the next two holes and I felt really happy actually ‑‑ 2‑over.  I had nine birdies and three bogeys.  I'm just a bit disappointed I 3‑putted 17.  I missed a short putt there, but I really felt like I was going to hole my first putt.
           
So I raced it about five feet past and left myself a tricky putt downhill left‑to‑right.  And I hit a really good putt but it just slid past and lipped‑out which is a bit annoying.  But probably I'm most happy about hitting 18 fairway because I've hit nearly three balls out‑of‑bounds to the right off my tee shot this week.
           
So to get one in the fairway on last hole, I was actually really happy.  And to make birdie, I was even happier, because I've actually made birdie with my second or third ball or whatever each day.  But to actually have a birdie on my card instead of a 7 or 6, I'm quite happy.

Q.  How did you hit out‑of‑bounds?
CHARLEY HULL
:  First round I hit (inaudible) ‑‑ yesterday I hit it out right, hit a provisional off the tee and hit it two inches in bounds, so I had to take the drop.  Hacked it out, pitched it up, holed a putt for 7.  It was the best 7 I've ever had.

           
Q.  Curious about your mind‑set standing on 18, how do you block out what's happened in previous rounds?
CHARLEY HULL: 
I was about to pull my 3‑wood out, and then my caddie was like, no, don't hit 3‑wood.  I thought, well, at the end of the day, that out‑of‑bounds is 60 yards right and I'm ripping it out there.  And so I thought, aim it to the left and hit a fade.
           
I just faded it down the fairway and just pretend I'm playing a tree‑lined hole instead of out‑of‑bounds; visualisation, I find it hard to see links golf courses, because everything is so flat.  I feel I can sometimes drive better ‑‑ inaudible ‑‑ I tried to pretend it was a really wide hole, so just hit a little fade down the left and managed to hit it into the fairway.

Q.  The weather has been so beautiful; can you talk about what makes this course so difficult?
CHARLEY HULL: 
I think the rough.  I think it's intimidating off the tee to be honest.  It is a great golf course and the greens are tricky, as well, because they are so old, they have them little dips, so they are quite sneaky on you.
           
I actually sometimes find links a bit easier when there's a bit of wind because I feel like I can ride off it where it's in front of you, there's no wind, I find it quite weird to play, probably because I'm so used to playing links in the wind anyway.

Q.  When you walked off 18 yesterday with the best seven you've ever made in your life I think you've said, did you still feel The Open was pretty much open to you?
CHARLEY HULL:
  No, I said to my dad last night, I'm not out of this championship.  I think it was ‑‑ someone was ten shots behind off the lead.

Q.  Paul Lawrie?
CHARLEY HULL:
  And that was in the final round, wasn't it ‑‑

Q.  Carnoustie ‑‑
CHARLEY HULL: 
Carnoustie.  I said I'm not out of this championship.  I said to my dad:  I can still win it if I have a good day tomorrow.  If the wind gets up tomorrow, it even par could win it.

Q.  Did you have a score in mind?
CHARLEY HULL:
  No, just thought I'd go out there and play well.  You know, 66 is nice.

Q.  And lastly, what was the shot you were trying to play on 18 on Thursday and Friday?
CHARLEY HULL:
  Straight.  Because I've hit it  ‑‑ I hit the tee shot in the practise days, hit an awesome tee shot down there but apparently not in the actual tournament.  So down the left with a fade.

Q.  How complete is the picture ‑‑
CHARLEY HULL:
  I'm pretty much doing it on every hole, because you know, I'm actually visualising it really well which I'm quite happy with.  Because me, actually it's not just my coach ‑‑ actually helps me visualise stuff.
           
It's great because I'm really, really changing the picture of what it is.  And the fact that I did that last week on some holes at Buckinghamshire which it's quite linksy anyway.  It has trees but flat with the dunes and stuff and you have the thick rough.  That helped me for this week.

Q.  Tall pines or elms or ‑‑
CHARLEY HULL:
  I don't know, just really picture like Woburn, just really try and visualise it.

Q.  Given the situation where you are, where does this round fit in ‑‑
CHARLEY HULL: 
You know, Morocco, that was a great round for me, having 9‑under in the last round to win the tournament.  And then shooting 66 in the Kraft Nabisco, that put me within two of the lead.  And here, definitely, yeah, they are all top rounds so far this year.
           
Especially being in front of the home crowd, I felt like I had a bit of pressure on me coming into the beginning of this week, especially with RICOH, my sponsor, people are expecting a lot of me, and I feel like I kind of stepped up there today and really proved myself.  It was great to have a good crowd out there as well.
           
I think the pressure is good, though, coming into a tournament, because it shows that you have played quite well coming into this tournament and played a well this season.  So you can see it two ways and I suppose take the positives and think it's a good thing?

Q.  What is the state of British golf?  People seem excited; do you feel that?
CHARLEY HULL:
  I don't know, I'm usually away a lot but there's some great golfers out there.  Especially Holly, Holly Clyburn; she's a friend of mine.  She's a great golfer, and she's definitely a good one to look for for the majors in the future and this one, as well, which is great.

Q.  How did you like playing with Lexi today?  She had it going the opposite direction.
CHARLEY HULL: 
It's fun playing with Lexi.  I like playing with Lexi.  We played together in the Solheim in the third round when she played with Paula, and I have good memories then ‑‑ I played Paula twice.  I played with Lexi then and then I played a practise round with her here on Monday, just the back nine holes.  I like playing with Lexi, a few years ago, she was one of my favourite golfers because she was young and everything.  So it was good and nice to be friends.  We had a lot of fun out there.

Q.  It all seems very uncomplicated.  Is it?
CHARLEY HULL: 
It is complicated, but it's what you make of it.  You can make it easy and some days it can be really hard.  You know, it's easy to make it hard but complicated, you know, I don't know.
           
Playing rounds like I did, the two bogeys at the start was a bit complicated that you I shot 6‑under but you've just got to keep in there and it's easy to shoot a low score but it's hard to, golf is just a strange sport but I love it.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:   Good time to do the birdies and bogeys.  You started with a couple bogeys?
CHARLEY HULL:
  I hit my drive left, which I did on the first day.  I hacked it out, hit it straight onto about 15 foot and I just missed it.
           
Next hole, pushed my drive off to the right, pitched up, hit my pitch over the green for my third shot and chipped up and holed the putt.
           
Rescue down the next hole, 7‑iron to seven feet, birdie.
           
Next hole, the par 3, 5‑iron, four feet left, birdie.
           
Next hole, I hit a good tee shot down there, my rescue, 8‑iron right.  Holed my putt, it was only about 15 foot away and I thought I had it and it just missed.
           
Next hole I birdied.  It was a good birdie.  Hit a great drive.  My caddie told me to aim left at the pin but I was like, no, I'm going straight at it, 8‑iron, about ten foot right, birdie.
           
Parred the next few holes.  Probably should have birdied nine.  But the next birdie, it was ‑‑ I put it like 30 foot left of the pin with a 7‑iron.
           
Next one, 7‑iron, 15 foot left, birdie ‑‑
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  Have you ever had four twos before?
CHARLEY HULL: 
I think so ‑‑ actually, I don't even know about that.
           
The next hole I hit my drive right in the bunker, through to the green, holed a 30‑footer.
           
Next hole, great drive, wedged up to ten feet and birdied that.
           
17 you know, 5‑footer coming back.
           
18, over the back of the green, good hot, chipped up and holed the putt.

Q.  Is there ever a time that you don't play aggressively?  Have you dialed it back at all as a pro from experience now?
CHARLEY HULL: 
Well, I don't know.  I don't realise that I play aggressive golf but I probably do.  But I suppose I do sometimes.  I just hit it.  If it's a stupid pin, I'm not going to take it on, but if it's reasonable, I just go for it.

Q.  How good would you say this round was?
CHARLEY HULL
:  I'd say it's good.

Q.  But in your personal pantheon of rounds, the best, the second best, fourth best?
CHARLEY HULL:
  Yeah, around that area.  I'd say 9‑under was my best round and then Kraft was a best round and this is a great round.
           
Yeah, it's probably up there, in front of the home crowd.  One of the best.  I don't know where it ranks, but yeah.

Q.  Why would you say 9‑ under was the best, because it was the lowest?
CHARLEY HULL:
  No.  Because it was ‑‑ I was six shots behind going into the final round or five shots and I think I shot 5‑under on that golf course in Morocco, and Morocco is a very tight golf course.  In the final round, I just hit driver everywhere, like even into places on the fairway where it was ten yards wide, I just hit driver, I took it out and hit it.  So, yeah, I am aggressive.  But I say that's one of the best rounds, especially the 4‑iron that I hit in the end to win in the playoff.

Q.  Laura Davies was saying people tend to over‑complicate things, especially young players coming through.  Is that very much your philosophy to keep things simple?
CHARLEY HULL:
  Yeah, like I always say, hit it, find it, hit it again, just do that.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  Is that the plan for tomorrow, as well?
CHARLEY HULL:
  Yeah, just go out there, do my thing.  I have my coach to work on a few shots, a few drivers today, just go out there and work on my putting as well and be ready for tomorrow.

 

 

 

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Park, Inbee, Lewis, Stacy, Pettersen, Suzann

Andrews Sports MedicineArpin Van LinesFloridas NaturalMedjet AssistMichelob ULTRAPrudentialSmuckers