Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I Pre-tournament notes & interviews

Kristy McPherson
Photo Credit: Gregory Shamus/Getty Images

Kristy McPherson chips to the second green during the final round of the Jamie Farr Owens Corning Classic at Highland Meadows Golf Club.

Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I
Highland Meadows Golf Club
Sylvania, Ohio
August 7 & 8, 2012
Pre-Tournament Notes and Interviews

August 8, 2012

Ai Miyazato, Rolex Rankings No. 5
Paula Creamer, Rolex Rankings No. 12

Storylines at the Jamie Farr

The LPGA Tour is back in the United States and will kick off its slate of August tournaments at the 27th Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I. Despite its hiatus from the schedule in 2011, 144 ladies slated to be in the field are eager to return to the Highland Meadows Golf Club for its large, enthusiastic crowds and they will compete this week for a $1.3 million purse.

Hometown Hero
Toledo native Stacy Lewis will be welcomed by her hometown crowd as she competes for her fourth career win and continues to make a run for the top position in the Rolex Rankings. Fresh off a runner up finish at the Evian Masters, Lewis now leads the LPGA Tour in season earnings with $1.2 million and the Rolex Player of the Year race by 21 points ahead of No. 1 Yani Tseng. She has a tour-leading record of 10 top-10s this season including two victories at the Mobile Bay Classic and the ShopRite LPGA Classic.

Defending Champ
Na Yeon Choi returns to Highland Meadows Golf Club two years after outlasting I.K. Kim, Song-Hee Kim and Christina Kim in a two-hole, sudden-death playoff, securing her third career victory. She came out of the floodgates in the 2012 season on a hot streak posting back-to-back runner ups in two of the first three events and posted two additional top-10s just weeks later. Now a major champion following her victory at the U.S. Women’s Open last month, she seeks to keep the streak going and chase Yani Tseng and Stacy Lewis for the title of No. 1 on the Rolex Rankings.

Home stretch
The Jamie Farr Toledo Classic marks the beginning of a three week stretch for the LPGA Tour and the first of the last five official domestic events on the tournament schedule. With the RICOH Women’s British Open looming next month, players will be stepping their game up as they approach the final major of the season.

Gulbis to end winless streak                                                                  
Natalie Gulbis stunned many last week with a spectacular performance as she sought to end her prolonged winless drought. Her last victory came in the 2007 Evian Masters and since then, she has only posted nine top-10 finishes. Posting a tie for fourth in France may have given her the boost she needs to excel her game in the final half of the season.

What’s happening on at the 14th Green?
Surrounding the perimeter of the 14th green on Friday nearly 400 spectators will have the opportunity to become the first members of the “Klinger Club,” a part of the first-ever “Friday at the Farr” event. The stadium seating and party-like environment will hopefully draw in large, rowdy crowds on the longest par three on the course. The concept is modeled after the PGA’s 16th hole atmosphere at the Waste Management Phoenix Open in Scottsdale, Ariz. Following the conclusion of the second round a local band will be performing on the green. 

Just be Yourself…With two wins already under her belt this season and No. 1 rankings in scoring average and rounds under par, it looks as if Ai Miyazato has returned to her old form. Miyazato had a spectacular year in 2010 winning five tournaments including the first two of the season. The next year failed to live up to Miyazato’s standards, as she won only one tournament and failed to make three cuts.

“It's been great,” said Miyazato. “I'm very happy with my game so far because I have a good feeling with my short game, so that makes my confidence, and also, I don't know, just having fun with every single tournament. It's just trying to be more myself now.  I'm enjoying my season so far, so it's been great.”

Last year, Miyazato’s focus was not on her golf game but rather on her home country of Japan which suffered a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami. The off-season allowed Miyazato some time to gather her thoughts and refocus on every tournament.

“I meant because, I mean, compared to last year, I won the Evian Masters last year, but then it was a little bit tougher because of the earthquake in Japan, so it was kind of tough to focus my game last year,” said Miyazato. “But after the off‑season, I cleared out everything, and now I can be more myself and try and enjoy the tournament every single week.  So that's why I said I can be more myself than I used to be.”

What a Day… The first round of the 2008 Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-1 will be a round that Paula Creamer will never forget. Creamer was playing well, but not even she realized she was shooting the round of her life.

“I mean 60, that was my lowest round ever,” said Creamer. “At the time I honestly didn’t realize I shot 60. I just remember looking at my scorecard at about the 15 hole and I was like man, there are a lot of circles on this card and just kind of kept on going.”

Creamer became only the fourth player to shoot a 60 in LPGA tournament history behind Meg Mallon, Jung Yeon Lee, and Anna Acker-Macosko. Creamer followed-up her impressive first-round with a 65 then went on to win the tournament.

“To end up winning the tournament was special too because you shoot 60 and I think I shot 65 the next day and it felt like I shot 100,” said Creamer. “That was the hardest thing, coming back the next day and going out to play.”

 

Ai Miyazato, Rolex Rankings No. 5

THE MODERATOR:  I'd like to welcome Ai Miyazato into the interview room for her pre‑tournament press conference.  First of all, the tournament took a year off last year.  How does it feel to be back in Toledo.
AI MIYAZATO:  It's so nice to be back here.  Last time I played this tournament was in '09, but this is such a great tournament because the atmosphere is so much better than at other tournaments because they always have a good crowd and the golf course is always in good shape, so it's nice to be back here.

THE MODERATOR:  You've had a good year so far.  You've won twice already.  How is your game shaping up heading into this week?
AI MIYAZATO:  It's been great.  I'm very happy with my game so far because I have a good feeling with my short game, so that makes my confidence, and also, I don't know, just having fun with every single tournament.  It's just trying to be more myself now.  I'm enjoying my season so far, so it's been great.

THE MODERATOR:  The LPGA had a week off last week.  Did you get a chance to do anything fun?
AI MIYAZATO:  I watched the Olympics most of the days.  I went back home, which is in California, and it was nice weather and I should go to the beach or somewhere, but I just stayed home and watched the Olympics because it's so inspiring, and it's so fun to watch.  Just most of the time I just stayed home.

THE MODERATOR:  How excited are you for 2016 for golf to return to the Olympics?
AI MIYAZATO:  You know, I still can't imagine with that because it's not like still for real for me.  But it's so exciting.  At the same time it's so exciting about it.  I'm just trying to imagine if I'm in the Olympics in 2016, it's going to be like my dreams come true.
I'm looking forward to it.

Q.  In regard to the Olympics have you had any images of putting yourself on the medal stand?
AI MIYAZATO:  Yeah, I did, and actually when I was an amateur I played the Asian Olympics, and I got the gold medal in the individual games.  But the imagination that I have in my head of seeing the Olympics on TV as well as having been up on the podium in the Asian Games, I can imagine.  So it feels great.

Q.  How does that stack up with the fact that you're chasing your first LPGA major tournament still?  Is that a priority for you?
AI MIYAZATO:  That's a good question.  Winning a major has been my childhood dream, but winning a medal at the Olympics, a gold, that just came up recently.  That's kind of what I've compared it to.  But I also feel that it's good to set new goals.  It would be good to get both.

Q.  You said earlier that you're enjoying being yourself.  Is that something new?  Were you not enjoying yourself earlier, or is that something you had to overcome?
AI MIYAZATO:  (Laughing) I meant because, I mean, compared to last year, I won the Evian Masters last year, but then it was a little bit tougher because of the earthquake in Japan, so it was kind of tough to focus my game last year.
But after the off‑season, I cleared out everything, and now I can be more myself and try and enjoy the tournament every single week.  So that's why I said I can be more myself than I used to be.

Q.  You're one of those Japanese players who has raised a lot of money and a lot of awareness for the people after that earthquake.  Can you talk a little bit about what that has meant to you and how are things back there now?
AI MIYAZATO:  I mean, still things are difficult in Japan.  Little things are getting better, but still, there's many suffering people.  I still need to ‑‑ I feel I still need to help the people.  I just want to keep continuing raising the money to Japan.
Raising awareness and funds with two other players on the Tour, that ended at the end of last year, but starting this year I'll try to work on things individually.

Q.  You are followed on Tour by the Japanese media here in this country like no American player is followed.  Does that put a little more pressure on you to perform well for your country, for yourself, anything like that?
AI MIYAZATO:  No, not really, because I've been playing on this Tour seven years now, so I feel more comfortable, and it doesn't feel like pressure from the media, Japanese media.  All the Japanese media is really nice to me, and they are very understanding.  We are kind of ‑‑ I don't know if it's right to say, but we are kind of like good friends, so that's why I think I don't feel any pressure from them.
But at the same time I also want to get back to good news to Japan.  The only mode to communication to the Japanese fans and Japanese people is through the media, I believe, so I just feel that it's just work for me.

Q.  The first few years you were out, your media contingent was larger than the whole rest of the media contingent.
AI MIYAZATO:  Yes.

Q.  Is that still the case?  Do you still have a lot of people following you around?
AI MIYAZATO:  No, it's definitely less now.  It's definitely not as many as before.

 

Paula Creamer, Rolex Rankings No. 12

MODERATOR: Alright, I’d like to welcome Paula Creamer to the Interview room. Paula, you won here in 2008. How good does it feel to be back in Toledo?
PAULA CREAMER:  It feels great, every time I’ve played this event it brings back so many fun memories. This is such a fun golf course, anything can happen out there and we’ve seen that in the past. To have won, the whole Pink Panther and Owens Corning it’s been interesting that’s for sure. We’ve gone through a lot of weather issues here and what not but the fans here are what makes this golf tournament. They love sports, they love women’s golf and it shows with how many years this tournament has been here and we’re back, its great.

MODERATOR:  I know your birthday was last. Did you do anything fun to celebrate?
PAULA CREAMER:  I didn’t really, 26 wasn’t really something great to celebrate. Twenty-five was fun, but 26, maybe 30 I’ll have a good party for that. I stayed home and went to Canyon Ranch for a couple days in Miami, they are one of the sponsors of the Tour. It was fun to be able to go there with one of my friends and I just practiced trying to get ready for this three week stretch.

Q. Two years ago you missed the cut here then went to Oakmont and won the US Open. How strange was that to miss the cut the week before one of the biggest tournaments?
PAULA CREAMER:  I don’t think it was necessarily strange by any means. I remember watching Na Yeon Choi, she missed the cut before she won here and I ended up doing it the next week. I saw her in France after winning the US Open and I said I watched you miss the cut and win and then I miss the cut and win. It’s part of golf, it’s sports things happen you just have to kind of overcome it.

Q.  Was there something here that happened because you were still overcoming the thumb situation? Was there something here that clicked?
PAULA CREAMER:  It was just getting more rounds under my belt. Its hard coming off an injury and I wasn’t able to hit balls off the ground, I was only off tee’s so things like that. It was kind of just get my way, I was out for several months and when you learn how to compete again in a sense you have to get the rust off.

Q. Can you talk about your game lately?
PAULA CREAMER:  I’ve been working really hard this year. I’ve had my ups-and-downs for sure like anyone does. My putting is coming around just trying to get a little more consistent with my four days. If I can put four days of golf together I think I can pretty much be in contention on Sunday no matter what. I just haven’t had that and my coach David and I are really trying to fine tune some things. It’s getting easier to take it from the range to the course and that’s been the hardest thing. It’s easy to hit a shot on the range and pull up another ball but you can’t have that out in a tournament. It’s trying to limit the mistakes really but it is coming around and I’m having more and more confidence in it. We’ll see, I want to finish the year off strong, that’s for sure. We have one more major and a couple big weeks coming up.

Q. That low round you shot here, do you remember anything about it?
PAULA CREAMER:  I mean 60, that was my lowest round ever. At the time I honestly didn’t realize I shot 60. I just remember looking at my scorecard at about the 15 hole and I was like man, there are a lot of circles on this card and just kind of kept on going. I birdied eight and nine which were my 17th and 18th hole  and I remember the putt on nine had seven and a half feet of break, a 15 feet left-to-righter and it just went on in. Those are the kind of putts that you are either going to have five feet coming back or you’re going to make it and it went in. Then adding it up in the scoring tent I looking at my caddie Collin thinking is this right and he was looking at me saying yeah, it’s right. Then to end up winning the tournament was special too because you shoot 60 and I think I shot 65 the next day and it felt like I shot 100. That was the hardest thing, coming back the next day and going out to play.

Q. Knowing that you can score on this golf course, a lot of players can score on this golf course, is there any kind of fine line you have to walk knowing that you can score and being greedy about it?
PAULA CREAMER:  You have to make birdies, it’s just what you have to. If you’re not making birdies, you aren’t going to be in the mix of things. Going into it it’s kind of tough knowing that if you have an afternoon time you might already be eight shots out of it and you haven’t even hit your first ball off the tee just because of the morning starts. So tomorrow I know the weather is going to be a little bit iffy but you have to start out strong, that’s for sure.

 

Pre-tournament Notes and Interviews
August 7, 2007

Na Yeon Choi, Rolex Rankings No. 3
Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 2

The LPGA Tour is back in the United States and will kick off its slate of August tournaments at the 27th Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I. Despite its hiatus from the schedule in 2011, 144 ladies slated to be in the field are eager to return to the Highland Meadows Golf Club for its large, enthusiastic crowds and they will compete this week for a $1.3 million purse.

Rolex Rankings No. 3 Na Yeon Choi revisits the course to defend her title after outlasting I.K. Kim, Song-Hee Kim and Christina Kim in a two-hole, sudden-death playoff back in 2010. Choi came out of the gates in full force for the 2012 campaign, posting back-to-back runner ups in two of the first three tournaments. Two more top-10s at the Kraft Nabisco Championship and the Sybase Match Play Championship led the way to her first victory of the season at the U.S. Women’s Open.

Others in the field this week include three of the top-5 finishers at the Evian Masters Presented by Société Générale, including that week’s champion Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 2 Stacy Lewis and No. 69 Natalie Gulbis.

 

Welcome Back, Welcome Back… With the Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I set to kick off this week after a year off; Na Yeon Choi is set to try to defend her title in a place where she feels comfortable.

Choi recently attended Media Day in Sylvania, Ohio, and just a short week later, she won her first major title at the U.S. Women’s Open.

“I’m really happy to be back in Toledo,” said Choi. “I was here last time when I had media day and then I went the US Open and I won. I had a great result after I did media day so I think this is something special for me and it gave me a lot of good luck. I had a great result and I just came back here again with a big win from the US Open so I feel very comfortable and very confident. I can trust my game right now so I’m really looking forward to this week.”

It was a whirlwind for Choi after her US Women’s Open victory as she returned home to Korea, played in Japan, went to London to watch the Olympics then made her way back home to Orlando to work with her coach.

“Actually after London I went to Orlando the last two days and had a lesson from my coach,” said Choi. “We are still working on my technical but you know when my body is tired, my mental is tired too. After the US Open I did a lot of things with the media in Korea, played in Japan, and I flew to Europe played in Evian, flew to London, then back to Orlando. I realize my body was very tired so the last four or five days I took rest and had just one or two hour practice a day. Most of the time I tried to take a rest and if my body feels okay then my mental is back to normal.”

Feeling refreshed and back to normal, Choi is confident heading to this weekend and looks poised to give a good run at defending her title.

“I feel very comfortable now,” said Choi. “I played 12 holes today and I hit a lot of good shots and made almost every green. I have confidence with my swing and the main thing is the greens here a very small so I have to hit the green first then I can make a lot of putts.”

 

It Feels Like Home… Stacy Lewis is returning to her old stomping grounds this week for the Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I. Born in Toledo, Ohio, it will be easy to spot Lewis’s family this week as they will be decked out in specially designed shirts.

“I really look forward to this event,” said Lewis. “My family is so excited to come out they have been working on their shirts for two years so they’re getting ready to go. I’m looking forward to the event.”

This week always marks a busy week for Lewis but coming back as one of the top players in world adds a little more responsibility for the three-time LPGA Tour winner.

“Yeah, it’s hard, it’s was definitely a hard week coming here as a rookie,” said Lewis. “The week was busy but now coming back as one of the best players its gotten even more busy with more requests. My family understands that though, they’ve been great. Last night we got together for a big dinner and I’m sure we’ll have more throughout the week. It’s hard but I know what to expect now coming in now, that’s the big thing. I know this week is busy and that’s a good problem to have.”

 

Olympic Visit… Na Yeon Choi had an eventful week off after the Evian Masters as she visited London to watch the Olympics first-hand. Quite the good luck charm for Korea, Choi watched two women’s volleyball games, handball and the men’s 200 meter swimming.

“I went to indoor volleyball games twice, I have a lot of friends that play so I watched the two games and they won,” said Choi. “Then I watched handball with Norway and they tied but it was a good match. They were down two points with two seconds and they finished a tie. Then I watched the 200 meter freestyle swimming and Korean Tae Hwan Park, he won a silver medal.”

With golf set to make its return at the 2016 Olympics, Choi’s recent trip to London further fueled her desire to secure a spot on the Korean team in Rio.

“My biggest goal is going to the 2016 Olympics so I felt some atmosphere in there,” said Choi. “I could see how much they had pressure but that made me more excited. My goal is still going in 2016 to the Rio Olympics and I had a very fun time.”

Choi is already accustomed to playing for her country as she was a member of the Korean National team at the young age of 14, but she realizes all eyes will be on her if she is representing her country in 2016.

“It’s a little different. I mean, I was on the Korean National Team when I was 14 and I played under the Korean flag,” said Choi. “If I play in the Olympics, all the Korean players support other Korean players. I think it’s just like the US Open I play the LPGA Tour and my fans support me but if I play at the Olympics all the people watch, even some people all around the world, all the people watch the Olympics. I think it will be a little different.”

 

Rest and Relaxation…  Currently in her third year on the LPGA Tour, Lewis’s jam-packed LPGA schedule has made her reevaluate how she spends her off weeks.

This year, Lewis has made it a priority to relax more during her off weeks and she even picked a new hobby, paddle boarding.  Lewis got just the opportunity to refine her paddleboarding skills last week as the LPGA Tour had a week break after the Evian Masters.

“Once I adjusted back from France, from the jetlag I just enjoyed some time at home at the beach, went paddle boarding and just kind of relaxed a little,” said Lewis. “I found during the off weeks I need to kind of relax my mind and I body. I practiced some but it’s more I can prepare when I get to the tournament I can prepare. I’ve just been enjoying the off weeks a little bit more.”

Paddleboarding is a water sport where you gain momentum by paddling while either standing or kneeling on a board a little longer than a surfboard. Lewis seems to have become quite the daredevil as she expressed her disappointed of not seeing a shark during her most recent paddleboarding adventure.

“I do it quite a bit when I’m at home,” said Lewis. “I bought a board earlier this year. I went out on the ocean for the first time last week, I didn’t see any sharks but it was still a lot of fun.”

 

Na Yeon Choi, Rolex Rankings No. 3

Moderator:  Alright I’d like to welcome Na Yeon Choi into the interview room for her pre-tournament press conference of the Jamie Toledo Classic Presented by Kroger, Owens-Corning and O-I. You’re back in family territory this week, you won here in 2010. Can you just talk a bit about how excited you are to be back?
NA YEON CHOI:  I’m really happy to be back in Toledo. I was here last time when I had media day and then I went the US Open and I won. I had a great result after I did media day so I think this is something special for me and it gave me a lot of good luck. I had a great result and I just came back here again with a big win from the US Open so I feel very comfortable and very confident. I can trust my game right now so I’m really looking forward to this week.

MODERATOR:  You went to Korea after your win at the US Open. Can you just talk a little bit about that and what all you did back at home?
NA YEON CHOI:  Yeah, I was very excited being in Korea after the US Open win. All my family and friends and media there were waiting for me in the airport and everybody was welcoming me. I was very happy and I was very excited. I mean, I don’t think I can forget that feeling forever. I will keep that feeling until forever and that was special.

MODERATOR:  Can you talk a little bit about your time at the Olympics?
NA YEON CHOI:  I went to indoor volleyball games twice, I have a lot of friends that play so I watched the two games and they won. Then I watched handball with Norway and they tied but it was a good match. They were down two points with two seconds and they finished a tie. Then I watched the 200 meter freestyle swimming and Korean Tae Hwan Park, he won a silver medal.

MODERATOR:  How do you feel about golf being in the 2016 Olympics?
NA YEON CHOI:  My biggest goal is going to the 2016 Olympics so I felt some atmosphere in there. I could see how much they had pressure but that made me more excited. My goal is still going in 2016 to the Rio Olympics and I had a very fun time.

Q. You said you got a feeling for the atmosphere in London. The feeling you got for that, was that similar to the one you got at the Open?
NA YEON CHOI:  It’s a little different. I mean, I was on the Korean National Team when I was 14 and I played under the Korean flag. If I play in the Olympics, all the Korean players support other Korean players. I think it’s just like the US Open I play the LPGA Tour and my fans support me but if I play at the Olympics all the people watch, even some people all around the world, all the people watch the Olympics. I think it will be a little different.

Q. That had to be, at the Open, all of your friends from the Tour and Korean just came and celebrated with you on the spot. That had to be a special feeling, wasn’t it?
NA YEON CHOI: Especially Se Ri Pak, she was waiting for me and I couldn’t imagine she was waiting for me but she was waiting for me. She came to me hugging me and encouraging me, that was a very special thing for me and very honored thing.

Q. You said you went to Korea after you won the US Open. Was that a planned trip or did you just want to see all your friends and family after a special moment?
NA YEON CHOI:  No, that was my plan. I just wanted to go to Korea after the Open and I had to play Japan tournament after the US Open. That’s why I came to Korea then I went to Japan for the golf tournament.

Q. Can you talk a little bit about how your game is shaping up going into this week?
NA YEON CHOI:  Actually after London I went to Orlando the last two days and had a lesson from my coach. We are still working on my technical but you know when my body is tired, my mental is tired too. After the US Open I did a lot of things with the media in Korea, played in Japan, and I flew to Europe played in Evian, flew to London, then back to Orlando. I realize my body was very tired so the last four or five days I took rest and had just one or two hour practice a day. Most of the time I tried to take a rest and if my body feels okay then my mental is back to normal.

Q. How do you feel now?
NA YEON CHOI:  I feel very comfortable now. I played 12 holes today and I hit a lot of good shots and made almost every green. I have confidence with my swing and the main thing is the greens here a very small so I have to hit the green first then I can make a lot of putts.

Q. When you were here a few weeks ago you mentioned that this is a course to score on. Does that make you have to walk a fine line in knowing you have to score and be greedy?
NA YEON CHOI:  I’m pretty sure the scores will be low but nobody can control the scoring. If I have a birdie chance I will do my best to make the putt but if I do my best I think all the good results will follow.

Q. Can you explain that Saturday round at the US Open?
NA YEON CHOI:  I couldn’t believe how I played. After the round I talked to my coach and caddie and I mean, I don’t know golf is a weird game. I didn’t try to shoot like 7-under par but I just played one shot at a time or hole-by-hole then I had a good result. I can’t control about the result, I just do what I can do and I just what’s under my control and good results will follow.

 

Stacy Lewis, Rolex Rankings No. 2

MODERATOR: Alright I’d like to welcome Stacy Lewis in to the interview for her pre-tournament press conference. The LPGA took a year off from this tournament and now we’re back, can you just talk a bit about how excited you are to be back?

STACY LEWIS:  I really look forward to this event. It’s a special place for me, it’s the first LPGA tournament I ever played in. My family is here, I was born here so it just has a lot of special meaning for me. My family is so excited to come out they have been working on their shirts for two years so they’re getting ready to go. I’m looking forward to the event.

MODERATOR:  You have had quite the season so far. You have had nine top-five finishes, two wins and to top it off you are ranked No. 1 on the money list. Can you just talk a little bit about how this year has been and how your game is shaping up?
STACY LEWIS:  This year has been awesome. I expected to play well but not as well as it has gone. It has been fun to ride the momentum of playing well. It’s even surprised some people but I don’t think it surprised me because I expect it out of myself. I don’t know, I can’t really pin point one that’s changed or whatever it’s been, it’s just been a good year.

MODERATOR:  The LPGA had a week off coming into this tournament. Did you do anything fun?
STACY LEWIS:  Once I adjusted back from France, from the jetlag I just enjoyed some time at home at the beach, went paddle boarding and just kind of relaxed a little. I found during the off weeks I need to kind of relax my mind and I body. I practiced some but it’s more I can prepare when I get to the tournament I can prepare. I’ve just been enjoying the off weeks a little bit more.

MODERATOR:  Do you paddle board a lot?
STACY LEWIS:  I do, I do it quite a bit when I’m at home. I bought a board earlier this year. I went out on the ocean for the first time last week, I didn’t see any sharks but it was still a lot of fun.

Q. Is there anything you worked on in particular going into this season that has maybe contributed to the success you’ve had?
STACY LEWIS:  I don’t know, I think over probably the last two years I’ve been working on my swing quite a bit and I think the changes came in a little bit in 2011 but finally this year they are starting to click. I’ve been hitting the ball a lot more solid. Even coming to a golf course like this I don’t know why but the fairways seem wider to me. I made that comment to my coach and he was like well you’re hitting it better, that’s why. I just feel a lot more confident with my game and I’ve been working on my putting a lot too so it’s been a combination of a couple things that have gotten me here.

Q.  Do you think momentum has carried you?
STACY LEWIS:  Absolutely, you get on a run where you’re playing good golf and seeing putts go in, all of confidence and mental and when you’re stepping up to a shot knowing you can hit that or make that putt. That’s been the biggest difference I think for me.

Q.  What is paddle boarding?
STACY LEWIS:  It’s like a big surfboard. You stand up on it, you have an oar and basically paddle on it.

Q. How long have you been doing that?
STACY LEWIS:  A little while. It’s just fun to get out on the water and relax and it’s a good workout.

Q. Being kind of home with all the relatives, do they give you your space and let you do your job pretty well?
STACY LEWIS:  Yeah, it’s hard, it’s was definitely a hard week coming here as a rookie. The week was busy but now coming back as one of the best players its gotten even more busy with more requests. My family understands that though, they’ve been great. Last night we got together for a big dinner and I’m sure we’ll have more throughout the week. It’s hard but I know what to expect now coming in now, that’s the big thing. I know this week is busy and that’s a good problem to have.

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Marathon Classic

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