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A collection of top moments in LPGA History from the 1970s to the 2000s.


1970's


1970

  • LPGA players competed in 21 events with a total purse of $435,040.
  • JoAnne Carner (right) joined the LPGA at the age of 30 and was named LPGA Rookie of the Year. She posted one win and eight top-ten finishes.
  • Shirley Englehorn won four tournaments in 30 days and strangely never won again.
  • Donna Caponi won her second consecutive U.S. Women's Open.
  • Jane Blalock won the Atlanta Lady Carling Open, the first of her 27 LPGA tournament victories.

1971

  • Sandra Haynie won three straight tournaments.
  • Joanne Carner won her first U.S. Open. She won eight USGA titles in her golf career, including the 1956 U.S. Girls Junior, the 1957, 1960, 1962, 1966 and 1968 U.S. Women's Amateurs, and the 1971 and 1976 U.S. Women's Opens. She is the only player in history to win all three championships.
  • Kathy Whitworth (right) swept the honors. She won the money title, the Vare Trophy, Player of the Year and led the tour with the most wins with five.

1972

  • Two LPGA Hall of Fame members captured their last career victories in 1972. LPGA Founder Marlene Hagge (right) won the Burdine's Invitational, the last of her 25 wins, while Betsy Rawls won the GAC Classic, the last of her 55 wins.
  • Jo Ann Prentice defeated Sandra Palmer and Kathy Whitworth at the Corpus Christie Invitational Open in the longest playoff in LPGA history - 10 holes.
  • Kathy Whitworth won her seventh Vare Trophy, an all-time LPGA record. She won the Vare from 1965-1967 and 1969-1972. She also tied Jane Blalock for the most wins with five.
  • 1973

    • Mickey Wright (right) won the Colgate-Dinah Shore Women's Circle, the final of her 82 victories.
    • Mary Mills won the LPGA Championship, her third LPGA major.
    • Susie Maxwell Berning won her second straight U.S. Women's Open at the Country Club of Rochester.

    1974

  • Sandra Haynie (right) won both the LPGA Championship and the U.S.Women's Open.
  • Kathy Whitworth won the Orange Blossom Classic for the fifth time, tying an all-time record for most wins at a single event.
  • JoAnne Carner took the money list title, the Player of the Year, the Vare Trophy and tied for the most victories of the season with Sandra Haynie with six.

1975

  • Sandra Palmer won the money title and the Player of the Year.
  • Amy Alcott (right) won the first of her 29 LPGA victories at the age of 19. She won the Orange Blossom Classic in only her third start as an LPGA member.
  • Sandra Haynie won her third straight Charity Golf Classic.
  • LPGA hired its first Commissioner in Ray Volpe.

1976

  • Jan Stephensen and Pat Bradley both secured their first LPGA victories. Bradley won the Girl Talk Classic, while Stephensen won the Sarah Coventry-Naples Classic.
  • Judy Rankin (right) became the first player in LPGA history to reach $100,000 in earnings in a single season. Rankin led the tour in wins with six, topped the money list, and took the Vare Trophy and Player of the Year Award.
  • Joanne Carner won her second U.S. Women's Open.
  • Donna Caponi won three straight tournaments.

1977

  • Chako Higuchi became the first player from Japan to win an LPGA major, the LPGA Championship. To date, she remains the only Japanese player to have won an LPGA major championship.
  • Hollis Stacy (right) won the first of her three U.S. Women's Opens at Hazeltine National Golf Club. She is one of only four players to have won three or more U.S. Opens.
  • Judy Rankin led the money list, won both the Vare Trophy and Player of the Year and tied Debbie Austin for the most wins with five.

1978

  • Nancy Lopez (right) was a rookie and won nine times. She won five consecutive tournaments in which she played, setting an all-time record, later tied by Annika Sorenstam. She was both the Player of the Year and the Rookie of the Year. She led the money title and captured the Vare Trophy. Her scoring average of 71.76 was a new record low.
  • Hollis Stacy won her second consecutive U.S.Women's Open at the country Club of Indianapolis.
  • Michiko Okado became the first player to win an LPGA event as a non-member. She won the 1978 Mizuno Japan Classic.

1979

  • The LPGA players competed for $4,400,000 in total prize money over 38 events.
  • Jerilyn Britz finished second at the LPGA Championship; behind Donna Caponi and won the U.S. Women's Open at Brooklawn Country Club.
  • LPGA Founder and Hall of Fame member Louise Suggs (right) was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame.
  • Nancy Lopez won eight times, led the money list and won both the Player of the Year and the Vare Trophy. She broke her own scoring record, averaging 71.20 strokes per round. She also became the youngest player to reach 10 wins at 22 years, two months and five days, a record that stands today.

1980's


1980

  • LPGA players competed for more than $5 million in total prize money.
  • Nancy Lopez became the youngest player in LPGA history to reach 20 career wins when she captured the 1980 Rail Charity Golf Classic. She was 23 years, 7 months, and 26 days old.
  • Donna Caponi and JoAnne Carner led the tour in victories with five each. Beth Daniel and Amy Alcott each won four, and Nancy Lopez won three.

1981

  • Kathy Whitworth became the first player to reach $1 million in career earnings at the U.S. Women’s Open.
  • Beth Daniel led the LPGA Money List, while JoAnne Carner won the Vare Trophy and the Player of the Year award.

1982

  • Kathy Whitworth won her 83rd LPGA tournament, the Lady Michelob, to pass Mickey Wright on the all-time win list.
  • JoAnne Carner won the World Championship of Women’s Golf to earn enough points to qualify for the LPGA Hall of Fame. She led the tour with five wins, topped the money list, and won the Vare Trophy.
  • John Laupheimer replaced Ray Volpe as the LPGA Commissioner. The LPGA moved its headquarters from New York to Sugar Land, Texas.

1983

  • The Nabisco Dinah Shore was designated an LPGA Major championship.
  • JoAnne Carner won her third consecutive Vare Trophy. Patty Sheehan and Pat Bradley led the tour in wins with four each. Sheehan was the Player of the Year.

1984

  • Juli Inkster became the first rookie in LPGA history to win two major championships. She captured the Nabisco Dinah Shore and the du Maurier Ltd. Classic. Inkster also won Rookie of the Year honors.
  • Mary Beth Zimmerman set the record for the lowest nine hole score in relation to par when she shot 8-under 28 at the Rail Charity Golf Classic at the Rail Golf Course in Springfield, Illinois.
  • Betsy King won her first LPGA tournament since joining the Tour as a rookie in 1977 at the Women’s Kemper Open. King won 20 events from 1984-1989. In her career, she claimed 34 titles, including six majors.
  • Hollis Stacy won her third U.S. Women’s Open at Salem Country Club in Salem, Mass. She won the USGA event in 1977 and 1978.

1985

  • Kathy Whitworth won her 88th and final LPGA tournament at the United Virginia Bank Classic. She holds the record for the most LPGA career victories.
  • Alice Miller became a first-time winner by clearing the field at the Nabisco Dinah Shore. She then proceeded to win three other events that season, the McDonald’s Championship, the S&H Golf Classic and the Mayflower Classic.

1986:

  • Pat Bradley won three of the four Major championships. She captured the Nabisco Dinah shore, the LPGA Championship and the du Maurier Ltd. Classic. She joined Babe Zaharias (1950) and Mickey Wright (1961) as the only players in history to win three Majors in the same season. Bradley also took the money title, Player of the Year, and the Vare Trophy. In her career she won 31 tournaments, including six majors.
  • Cindy Mackey won the MasterCard international Pro-Am by fourteen shots, an LPGA record.
  • Jane Geddes claimed her first LPGA victory at the U.S. Women’s Open by defeating Sally Little in an 18-hole play off. She backed up her major win with another title the following week at the Boston Five Classic. Geddes, Louise Suggs and SeRi Pak are the only three players in LPGA history to have won an event immediately after capturing the U.S. Women’s Open
  • Juli Inkster won four times, the McDonald’s Championship, the Women’s Kemper Open, the Lady Keystone Open and the Atlantic City Classic.

1987:

  • Ayako Okamoto from Japan became the first international player to win the Rolex Player of the Year Award. Okamoto posted 17 top-10 finishes, including four victories and four runner-up finishes. She also led the LPGA money list.
  • England’s Laura Davies won the U.S. Women’s Open at Plainfield Country Club in Edison, N.J.. She defeated Ayako Okamoto and Joanne Carner in an 18-hole playoff.
  • Nancy Lopez qualified for the LPGA Hall of Fame with her 35th win at the Sarasota Classic, the same event in which she claimed her first career win in 1978.
  • Pat Bradley became the first LPGA player to cross $2 million in career earnings.

1988:

  • Sherri Turner led the money list, Colleen Walker won the Vare Trophy and Nancy Lopez was the Player of the Year.

  • Liselotte Neumann won the U.S. Women’s Open at Baltimore Country Club as a rookie.
  • William Blue replaced John Laupheimer as LPGA Commissioner and he moved the LPGA headquarters to Daytona Beach, Florida.
  • 1989:

    • LPGA players competed for more than $14 million in total prize money.
    • Betsy King won six tournaments, including her first U.S. Women’s Open. She led the LPGA money list and captured her second Rolex Player of the Year Award. Beth Daniel won the Vare Trophy.
    • LPGA-USGA Girls Golf and the LPGA Urban Youth Golf Program were founded.

    1990's


    1990

    • Betsy King won the Nabisco Dinah Shore and her second consecutive U.S. Women’s Open at the Atlanta Athletic Club by one stroke over Patty Sheehan.
    • Beth Daniel won the Mazda LPGA Championship at its new home in Bethesda, Maryland. The tournament was the first LPGA event with a purse of $1,000,000.
    • Bill Blue resigned as LPGA Commissioner and was replaced by Charles Mechem.
    • Beth Daniel led the LPGA money list, led the Tour in wins with seven, and captured the Rolex Player of the Year and Vare Trophy 70.54.
    • The Solheim Cup, pitting players from the United States against players from Europe, was introduced.

    1991

    • Amy Alcott took home the Nabisco Dinah Shore title, Meg Mallon won the Mazda LPGA Championship and the U.S. Women’s Open at Colonial Country Club in Fort Worth, Texas, and Nancy Scranton captured the du Maurier Classic at Vancouver County Club.
    • Pat Bradley won three times in the month of September and qualified for the LPGA Hall of Fame when she won for the 30th time at the MBS Classic.
    • Pat Bradley led the LPGA money list, won the Vare Trophy and was named Rolex Player of the Year. She and Meg Mallon led the Tour in wins with four each.
    • 21 different LPGA players won tournaments, an LPGA record.

    1992

    • Shelly Hamlin returned to the Tour after undergoing a mastectomy to win the Phar-Mor – her first win since 1978.
    • Twenty-year old Brandie Burton won for the first time at the Ping/Welch’s Championship.
    • Dottie Pepper won the Nabisco Dinah Shore, Betsy King won the Mazda LPGA Championship, Patty Sheehan took the U.S. Women’s Open at Oakmont County Club in an 18-hole playoff over Juli Inkster, and Sherri Steinhauer captured the du Maurier Classic.
    • The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation was named the official national charity of the LPGA. The LPGA became the first professional golf organization to partner with an official national charity.
    • Dottie Pepper led the LPGA money list, won the Vare Trophy with a scoring average of 70.80 and captured the Rolex Player of the Year award.

    1993

    • Betsy King led the LPGA money list, was named Rolex Player of the Year and won the Vare Trophy with a stroke average of 70.85.
    • Helen Alfredsson won the Nabisco Dinah Shore, Patty Sheehan won the LPGA Championship, Lauri Merten won the U.S. Women’s Open, and Brandi Burton won the du Maurier.
    • Patty Sheehan qualified for the LPGA Hall of Fame.

    1994

    • Beth Daniel was the Rolex Player of the Year and won the Vare Trophy with a scoring average of 70.90.
    • Laura Davies won the LPGA money title for the first time.
    • Donna Andrews won the Nabisco Dinah Shore, Laura Davies captured the McDonald’s LPGA Championship, Patty Sheehan won her second U.S. Women’s Open and Martha Nause won her first major championship at the du Maurier.

    1995

    • Annika Sorenstam won her first Rolex Player of the Year award. She led the LPGA money list and took home the Vare Trophy with a scoring average of 71.00.
    • Nanci Bowen won her first and only major at the Nabisco Dinah Shore, Kelly Robbins captured the McDonald’s LPGA Championship, Annika Sorenstam won her first U.S. Women’s Open at the Broadmoor, and Jenny Lidback won her first and only major at the du Maurier.
    • The LPGA set a record for the most Rolex First-Time Winners in a season with 11. For the first time in LPGA history, four Rolex First-Time winners were named in four consecutive weeks – Kathryn Marshall (Jamie Farr Toledo Classic), Annika Sorenstam (U.S. Women’s’ Open), Tracy Kerdyk (JAL Big Apple Classic) and Becky Iverson (Friendly’s Classic).
    • Jim Ritts was appointed the LPGA Commissioner-elect in June of 1995.

    1996

    • Laura Davies was named the Rolex Player of the Year, Annika Sorenstam took home the Vare Trophy, averaging 70.47 and Karrie Webb led the LPGA money list.
    • Patty Sheehan won the Nabisco Dinah Shore, Laura Davies won the McDonald’s LPGA Championship and the du Maurier, and Annika Sorenstam won a second consecutive U.S. Women’s Open.
    • Betsy King qualified for the LPGA Hall of Fame.

    1997

    • Laura Davies set an LPGA record by winning the Standard Register PING for the fourth consecutive year.
    • Annika Sorenstam led the LPGA money list and was named the Rolex Player of the Year. Karrie Webb won the Vare Trophy with a scoring average of 70.00.
    • Betsy King won the Nabisco Dinah Shore, Chris Johnson captured McDonald’s LPGA Championship, Alison Nicholas won the US Women’s Open, and Colleen Walker took home the du Maurier.

    1998

    • Se Ri Pak won the U.S. Women’s Open at Black Wolf Run in a 20-hole playoff over amateur Jenny Chuasiriporn. Pak also won the LPGA Championship, winning two majors in her rookie year. She was named the Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year.
    • Annika Sorenstam won the Rolex Player of the Year award and the Vare Trophy with a scoring average of 69.99. She also led the LPGA money list.
    • Pat Hurst won the Nabisco Dinah Shore, and Brandie Burton captured the du Maurier.

    1999

    • Karrie Webb led the LPGA money list and won both the Rolex Player of the Year award and Vare Trophy, averaging 69.43 strokes per round.
    • Dottie Pepper won her second Nabisco Dinah Shore, Juli Inkster won the U.S. Women’s Open and the McDonald’s LPGA Championship and Karrie Webb captured the du Maurier.
    • Three players qualified for the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame – Juli Inkster, Amy Alcott and Beth Daniel.

    2000's


    2000

    • Karrie Webb took home two major championships – the Kraft Nabisco and the U.S. Women’s Open. Juli Inkster won the McDonald’s LPGA Championship, and Meg Mallon won the final edition of the du Maurier.
    • Sisters Annika and Charlotta Sorenstam won LPGA events in back-to-back weeks. Older sister Annika won the Welch’s Circle K in Tucson, Arizona. The next week, little sister Charlotta captured her first LPGA win at the Standard Register PING in Phoenix, Arizona.
    • Karrie Webb won both the Rolex Player of the Year award and Vare Trophy for the second consecutive year. She won seven times and led the LPGA official money list.
    • 24-time LPGA Tour winner Judy Rankin was inducted into the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame in the Veteran’s Category.

    2001

    • Annika Sorenstam became the first LPGA Tour player to break 60. She fired a second-round 59 at the Standard Register PING at Moon Valley Country Club in Phoenix, Arizona. That same week she also broke the LPGA record for the lowest 72-hole score in relation to. Sorenstam shot 27-under-par (65-59-69-68).
    • The Women’s British Open was designated as an LPGA major championship. The event was won by Se Ri Pak at Sunningdale Golf Club in Berkshire, England.
    • Karrie Webb won two major championships for the second consecutive year. She successfully defended her U.S. Women’s Open at Pine Needles Lodge and Golf Course in Southern Pines, N.C., and also won the McDonald’s LPGA Championship. Annika Sorenstam won the Kraft Nabisco.
    • 24-time LPGA Tour winner Donna Caponi was inducted into the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame in the Veteran’s Category.

    2002

    • Juli Inkster became the second oldest female player, after Babe Zaharias, to win the U.S. Women’s Open when she hoisted the trophy at Prairie Dunes in Hutchinson, Kansas. Inkster was 42 years, 13 days old. Inkster won the U.S. Women's Amateur on the very same course 22 years earlier.
    • Annika Sorenstam swept the year-end awards. She led the LPGA money list, captured the Vare Trophy and was named the Rolex Player of the Year. She also led the Tour in wins with eleven.
    • Four different LPGA players won major championships. Juli Inkster – U.S. Women’s Open, Annika Sorenstam – Kraft Nabisco Championship, Se Ri Pak – Weetabix Women’s British Open and Karrie Webb – McDonald’s LPGA Championship.
    • LPGA Founder and 26-time LPGA Tour winner Marlene Hagge was inducted into the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame in the Veteran’s Category.

    2003

    • Beth Daniel became the oldest player in LPGA history to win a tournament when she captured the Canadian Women’s Open at Point Grey Golf and Country Club in Vancouver, Canada. Daniel was 46 years, eight months and 29 days old.
    • Annika Sorenstam set a 54-hole, scoring record – 24-under-par – at the Mizuno Classic. She fired rounds of 63-63-66 on the Seta Golf Course in Shiga, Japan.
    • Lorena Ochoa was named the Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year. Ochoa posted eight top-10 finishes, including two runner-ups. She finished ninth on the year-ending LPGA money list.
    • Annika Sorenstam was inducted into the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame.

    2004

    • Minea Blomqvist set the record for the lowest round in an LPGA major championship when she fired a third-round 62 (-10) at the Women’s British Open at Sunningdale Golf Club in Berkshire, England.
    • Grace Park won her first Vare Trophy, while Annika Sorenstam claimed her seventh Rolex Player of the Year award. Sorenstam also led the LPGA money list.
    • Grace Park won her first LPGA major championship at the Kraft Nabisco. Annika Sorenstam won her second consecutive McDonald’s LPGA Championship; Meg Mallon won her second career U.S. Women’s Open at The Orchards in South Hadley, Mass.
    • Karen Stupples won her first LPGA major at the Weetabix Women’s British Open at Sunningdale in Berkshire, England. Stupples started the final round with back-to-back eagles on the opening two par-5 holes. Stupples shot a final-round 64 to post a five-shot victory over Rachel Hetherington.

    2005

    • Annika Sorenstam tied Nancy Lopez’s record for most consecutive wins in tournaments participated when she won the Kraft Nabisco Championship. (2004 Mizuno Classic, 2004 ADT Championship, 2005 MasterCard Classic, 2005 Safeway Classic, 2005 Kraft Nabisco Championship)
    • Annika Sorenstam set the record for the most consecutive wins at the same tournament with her fifth straight victory at the Mizuno Classic. With the fifth win, she also tied LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame members Mickey Wright and Kathy Whitworth for the record for most wins at the same tournament.
    • Annika Sorenstam captured her third consecutive McDonald’s LPGA Championship and her third career Kraft Nabisco Championship. Jeong Jang won the Weetabix British Open. Birdie Kim won the U.S. Women’s Open by holing out from a greenside bunker on the 72nd hole to edge out amateurs Morgan Pressel and Brittany Lang by two strokes.
    • Annika Sorenstam won her eighth Rolex Player of the Year award, an LPGA all-time record. She posted victories in 10 of the 20 events in which she played.
    • Karrie Webb was inducted into the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame.

    2006

    • The LPGA Tour devised the first-ever playoff system in the world of professional golf with the season-ending ADT Championship. The tournament awarded the highest first-place prize in LPGA history - $1 million.
    • Lorena Ochoa tied the LPGA record for the lowest round in an LPGA major championship. She carded a first-round 62 (-10) at the Kraft Nabisco Championship, tying the record set by Minea Blomqvist in 2004.
    • Karrie Webb fired a final-round 65 to win her seventh career major championship at the Kraft Nabisco. Webb won in dramatic fashion, holing out a 116-yard wedge shot to force a playoff with Lorena Ochoa. Webb defeated Ochoa on the first hole of the sudden-death playoff.
    • For the first time in LPGA history three of the four major championships were decided in playoffs. Webb defeated Ochoa at the Kraft Nabisco Championship, Se Ri Pak defeated Webb in a playoff at the LPGA Championship, and Annika Sorenstam defeated Pat Hurst in an 18-hole playoff at the U.S. Women’s Open.
    • Sherri Steinhauer became the second oldest player, behind Fay Crocker, to win an LPGA major Championship at the Weetabix Women’s British Open. Steinhauer was 43 years, 7 months and 10 days old.
    • LPGA Founder and 18-time LPGA Tour winner Marilynn Smith was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame for Lifetime Achievement.

    2007

    • The RICOH Women’s British Open was played for the first time on the Old Course at St. Andrews in St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland. Lorena Ochoa won her first LPGA major championship with a four-stroke victory over Maria Hjorth and Jee Young Lee.
    • Se Ri Pak tied the LPGA record for most wins at the same tournament when she captured the Jamie Farr Owens Corning Classic for the fifth time. She tied Mickey Wright, Kathy Whitworth and Annika Sorenstam.
    • Morgan Pressel became the youngest player in LPGA history to win an LPGA major championship at the Kraft Nabisco. Pressel was 18 years, 10 months and nine days old when she hoisted the trophy.
    • Se Ri Pak was inducted into the LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame.

    2008

    • The LPGA Tour instituted the first-ever drug testing policy in the world of professional golf.
    • Annika Sorenstam stepped away from the LPGA Tour to focus on family and business interests. In her final year, she won three times, posted 10 top-10s and finished fourth on the LPGA money list.
    • Lorena Ochoa dominated the year-end awards. She led the LPGA money list, won the Rolex Player of the Year award and claimed the Vare Trophy.
    • Lorena Ochoa captured her second career LPGA major championship at the Kraft Nabisco; Yani Tseng became a Rolex First-Time winner when she won the McDonald’s LPGA Championship as an LPGA rookie. Tseng was named the Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year.
    • Inbee Park won the U.S. Women’s Open and became only the fifth player in USGA history to win both the U.S. Girls Junior and the U.S. Women’s Open. Jiyai Shin won the RICOH Women’s British Open as a non-LPGA member. She also won the Mizuno Classic and the ADT Championship before joining the LPGA Tour in 2009.

    2009

    • Catriona Matthew won her first major championship at the RICOH Women's British Open, a mere 11 weeks after giving birth to her second daughter. Matthew carded rounds of 74-67-71-73 at historic Royal Lytham and St. Annes in Lancashire, England. Matthew became the first player from Scotland to win an LPGA major.
    • Jiyai Shin became the first player from South Korea to win the LPGA money title. Shin won three times, earned $1,807,334 and was named the Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year. Shin also finished one point behind Lorena Ochoa in the Rolex Player of the Year race.
    • Lorena Ochoa won the Rolex Player of the Year award and Vare Trophy for the fourth consecutive time.
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