North Texas LPGA Shootout Second Round Notes and Interviews

North Texas LPGA Shootout
Las Colinas Country Club
Irving, Texas
Second-round Notes and Interviews
April 26, 2013

Caroline Masson -7, Rolex Rankings No. 54
Carlota Ciganda -6, Rolex Rankings No. 48
Inbee Park -5, Rolex Rankings No. 1
Moriya Jutanugarn -5, Rolex Rankings No. 132
Yani Tseng -4, Rolex Rankings No. 4
Angela Stanford -3, Rolex Rankings No. 18

Friday’s Second-round Recap

2013 LPGA Tour rookie Caroline Masson managed to weather a rough finish to her second round and  hold the lead for the second straight day at the inaugural North Texas LPGA Shootout at Las Colinas Country Club in Irving, Texas. Masson followed up her bogey-free 64 on Thursday by recording bogeys on three of her final four holes in Friday’s second round to shoot an even-par 71 and remain at 7-under-par overall for the event.

Masson leads by one shot over 2012 LET Rookie of the Year Carlota Ciganda, who fired a 1-under 71 on Friday.

“I didn't play as good as yesterday, but I expected that after that round yesterday,” Masson said. “So I was off to a good start with a birdie on one, which was really nice.  And it calmed me down a little bit, and after that I just made a few good pars, but I also made some good putts for birdie. The last few ‑‑ yeah, that was just some bad shots on the last few holes, but still I think, yeah a round of level par is never bad, you know.  And especially in that situation.  So I'm just looking forward to the weekend.”

The round of the day on Friday belonged to a fellow LPGA Tour rookie, 18-year-old Moriya Jutanugarn. The Bangkok, Thailand native shot a 5-under 66 to move into a tie for third, two shots behind the leader, Masson. Jutanugarn currently leads the 2013 Louise Suggs Rolex Rookie of the Year race. Also sitting two shots back of Masson is Rolex Rankings No. 1 Inbee Park, who shot a 1-under 70 despite missing two short putts around five feet in over her final two holes.

“Today was a little bit more windier than yesterday,” Park said. “So it was a little bit more challenging with picking clubs.”

There is a strong group of players currently at 4-under-par including Yani Tseng, who held the No. 1 spot in the Rolex Rankings for 109 consecutive weeks prior to losing the ranking to Stacy Lewis on March 18. Also in that group at 4-under are a few other former LPGA Tour winners including Shanshan Feng, who captured last year’s Wegmans LPGA Championship to become the first ever winner on the LPGA from China, and Americans Brittany Lincicome and Jessica Korda.

Fort Worth resident Angela Stanford remained the top ranking Texan in the field, following up her opening round 2-under 69 with a 1-under 70 to sit in a tie for 11th at 3-under-par. Stanford is one of seven Texans to make the cut following Friday’s second round.

A total of 80 players made the cut, which fell at 3-over-par 145. As part of the event’s “Shootout” format, there will also be a second cut made on Saturday that will reduce the field to the top 50 players and ties.

Make it stop! Caroline Masson struggled to close her round on Friday, making bogies at three of the last four holes, but the 23-year-old German still holds a one-shot lead after 36 holes at the North Texas LPGA Shootout. Following an even-par 71 in the second round, Masson was honest about her round.

“I'm pretty happy it's over now,” she said. “I can just relax now and tomorrow I think I'll be fine again.”

Masson’s career-best LPGA finish came as a member of the Ladies European Tour in 2011, when she tied for fifth at the RICOH Women’s British Open. This year, her best finish was a tie for 13th at the Kraft Nabisco Championship.

Looking ahead to the weekend, Masson’s outlook was simple.

“An even par round is fine and I'm still in the lead, so yeah, I'm just going to take it as it is and just look forward to the weekend,” she said.

Traveling queen: Carlota Ciganda has spent the last eight weeks traveling the U.S. as part of her second year on the LPGA Tour. But the native of Pamplona, Spain, who is sitting in second following a round of 71 on Friday, plans to split the 2013 season between the LPGA and the LET Tours. That decision is likely a result of her desire to make this year’s European Solheim Cup Team.

Ciganda, who currently ranks second in points for the European Solheim Cup Team, will travel back to Spain next week and the plan is for her to spend the month of May playing events on the LET in Turkey, Holland and Germany. She will then return to the U.S. for the Wegmans LPGA Championship followed by another LPGA event in Arkansas and then the U.S. Women’s Open. The top four points earners will make the European Solheim Cup Team.

But Ciganda doesn’t seem to mind the travel.

“I really like the U.S.,” Ciganda said. “It's a great country.  I studied here, and I mean I love it here because everything is easy.  I mean the courses we play, they are great and the people are very, very nice. I just take my weeks off in Arizona, which it was really nice to go back there and see my friends.

“And Europe, it's nice, too, because I am closer from home and I can go home in the weeks off.  But I love it here and I think the future is to be here.  So I'll be playing in the U. S. and Europe this year, and then next year I'll try to go more here.”

Ciganda didn’t play many LPGA events in her rookie year in 2012. She spent the majority of her time on the Ladies European Tour, where she became the first player since Laura Davies in 1985 to win both the LET Order of Merit and Rookie of the Year honors.

Stroke of luck: Inbee Park has been playing some phenomenal golf of late but to be No. 1 in the world also takes a little bit of luck. And the 24-year-old South Korean had that on her side for one hole in Friday’s second round as well.

On Park’s ninth hole – the par-5th No. 18 since she teed off on 10 – she pushed her second shot to the right and it hit off the rocks next to the water and bounced back into the fairway. She would hit her third shot inside 10 feet and make the putt for a birdie.

“I thought after I hit the ball, I thought it was definitely in the water because I wanted to hit it to the left on the bunker side, but I hit a push and I thought it was definitely in the water but everybody clapped, so I thought I got really lucky and ended up with a birdie on that hole,” Park said. “So it was very good.”
           
Of course as quickly as luck can be on your side, it can also go the other way. That seemed to be the case for Park on her second-to-last hole of the day when her putt for par lipped out. It was one of two short putts that Park missed in her final two holes, which is a rarity for a player who is considered to be one of the best putters on Tour.

“No. 8 was just a very bad lip‑out,” Park said. “I mean I had a pretty good putt, but it just lipped out.  You can't do much about that.  I haven't had that many lip‑outs in a while.  But it happens.  It was just one of those days.”

Rookie race: It’s been a good start to the year for 2013 LPGA Tour rookie Moriya Jutanugarn. The 18-year-old Thailand native has

Jutanugarn is currently ranked first in the Louise Suggs Rolex Player of the Year race with 236 points, which is more than double the point total of Ayako Uehara who sits in second with 108 points.

“I'm pretty surprised I had a good start this year because before I start the tour this year, I kind of nervous a little bit because I don't know what is going to happen,” Moriya Jutanugarn said. “So it was really a surprise, and I try to work hard every time when I play and try to enjoy every time when I play.”

One player who isn’t competition for Jutanugarn in this year’s rookie race is her sister, Ariya, who instead is a rookie on the Ladies European Tour. Ariya Jutanugarn has played in a few LPGA events this year as well, finishing runner-up in Thailand and third in Hawaii. The 17-year-old tried to Monday qualify for this week’s event in Texas but she missed doing so by one stroke. Instead, the two sisters will be paired again in the field next week at the Kingsmill Championship where Ariya will be playing on a sponsor invite. So bring on the competition between the two!

“Like every time,” Moriya joked when asked how much the two compete. “I mean all the time, like everything else.  We really fighting and really competitive.  It's so much when you have a sister with you and practicing, you had a friend and you had good like competitor.”

Working her way back…Former Rolex Rankings No. 1 Yani Tseng is in the mix at the North Texas LPGA Shootout. But it’s not a return to No. 1 she has her eye on. The 24-year-old world No. 4 simply wants to get back into the winner’s circle, a spot she has not been in since March 2012. With a two-round tally of 4-under-par 138, she is just three shots off the pace of leader Caroline Masson.

“I'm not worrying about No. 1 or anything about (the) ranking,” Tseng said. “Now I just want to win a tournament. I think the ranking is just a bonus if you're winning.”

Tseng started her 2013 campaign with a runner-up finish at the ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open and a tie for third at the Honda LPGA Thailand. She has failed to finish inside the top 28 in four tournament since then. Regardless of her record, Tseng is focused on the task at hand at Las Colinas this weekend.

“You just need to be patient on this course, and I think I did for those two days,” she said. “I just need to make some more putts.”

Happy or Sad? Saginaw’s Angela Stanford wasn’t thrilled with her second-round 70. But her attitude changed when she realized that, at 3-under-par 139, she sat only four shots behind the leader. So much for leaderboard watching.

“Anybody's ball game now,” she said. “I thought I was like six or seven shots down.”

Stanford was 3-under-par on the day and 5-under-par overall through 13 holes on Friday, but bogies at six and eight dropped her into a tie for 11th.

“You kind of have to be patient, and I thought I did my best, and I kind of lost it there in the end,” she said. “Just gotta get over it and keep going.”

Everybody’s Working for the Weekend: A total of 80 players made the cut, which fell at 3-over-par 145

Tweet of the Day: “Met Paula today! And got to sign some autographs! http://instagram.com/p/Ylg4vnxoAP/ -- @TaylorColeman9, the 16-year-old High Schooler from San Antonio, Texas who made the cut on Friday

Of Note…LPGA and World Golf Halls of Fame member Se Ri Pak withdrew after playing eight holes in the second round on Friday…The two qualifiers from the High School Shootout, which took place on Monday at Las Colinas Country Club, both made the cut. Haley Mills, 18, of Fort Worth, Texas finished at 2-over-par while 16-year-old Taylor Coleman of San Antonio, Texas was 3-over-par through two rounds.


Caroline Masson, Rolex Rankings No. 54

THE MODERATOR:  We'd like to welcome our current leader, Caroline Masson into the interview room.  Nice day out there, even par 71.  I know it got off to a hot start and probably not the finish you were exactly hoping for, but take me through the day and how your round went out there.
CAROLINE MASSON:  Yes.  I mean you know, I finished with like three bogeys on my last four holes, so it's a bit disappointing, but still, I played really solid, you know.
           
It's playing maybe a little tough there.  I didn't play as good as yesterday, but I expected that after that round yesterday.  So I was off to a good start with a birdie on one, which was really nice.  And it calmed me down a little bit, and after that I just made a few good pars, but I also made some good putts for birdie, and then yeah, the last few ‑‑ yeah, that was just some bad shots on the last few holes, but still I think, yeah a round of level par is never bad, you know.  And especially in that situation.  So I'm just looking forward to the weekend.

THE MODERATOR:  When we looked at the scores today, too, we didn't see as many low numbers.  It seems people weren't able to put together the type of runs that we saw yesterday.  Were the conditions much tougher?  What do you think accounted for the fact that we haven't seen as many low scores.
CAROLINE MASSON:  I don't really know.  It was a little windier than yesterday.  I think so but still there were so many chances out there to make birdie.  But it all got a little firmer, the fairways, the greens, so maybe it was just a little tougher to make birdies.  And that's probably why.

THE MODERATOR:  Take me through that stretch.  I know you said three bogeys in the last four holes.  What went differently for you in that stretch than early when it seemed like you were just making birdies and kind of cruising along there.
CAROLINE MASSON:  Yeah.  Well, I made bogey on 15, hit it in the water off the tee.  I mean it's just a difficult tee shot.  I hit it a little left, so I think it just carried down the downslope and just went in the water.  It was not a horrible shot.  But that just happens.  I made bogey there.  Missed the putt and made bogey.  Yeah, the next tee shot was pretty far left.  So actually I could go ‑‑ I was going for the green.  Just for some reason hit a good shot and stayed a little short.  I couldn't make that putt either.  Yeah, then on 18 I hit it left again.  I think it was actually an all right tee shot because everything kicks to the right.  And if that one had been just a few meters further right it would have been fine.  But just in front of a tree.  Chip out in front of a tree again.  So I just made bogey there.  But yeah, as I said, overall it was still a good round, I think.

THE MODERATOR:  And to still finish in the lead and be holding the lead as you head into the weekend, what are kind of the goals as you head into the weekend and does your plan change at all in how you approach this golf course?
CAROLINE MASSON:  No.  I have to stay patient.  That's my goal, you know.  Even if I make some bogeys out there, I can always make birdies, and just be as relaxed as I can.  Don't think about the lead too much and just enjoy the golf course.  And I still think I'm hitting it pretty good.  So I'm sure ‑‑ you know, if I can keep doing that on the weekend, I'll do fine.

Q.  Is it difficult to follow up such a great one as the first one, bogey‑free 64?
CAROLINE MASSON:  I think it always is, yeah because your expectations are pretty high.  It seems like it's so easy when you shoot a round like that and the next day you might struggle a little bit.  So that's why I was really happy that I had a really good start, you know, with a birdie on 1 and then a few more birdies.  And then yeah, so I think a level par after a 7‑under in the first round is not a bad round, so I'm pretty happy with that.

Q.  Caroline, after an ending stretch like that, are you almost glad it's over or do you wish you had more holes to play so you could try to turn it around?
CAROLINE MASSON:  After the last few holes, I'm actually ‑‑ I think I'm pretty happy it's over now.  It's always a long day when you play in the afternoon, so yeah, I'll just ‑‑ I don't know.  I don't know what went wrong really.  It was just a few bad shots, but I think that it's good that it's over and then I can, yeah, just relax now and tomorrow I think I'll be fine again.

Q.  You're happy with the even round, the even‑par round, but is there a part of you that kind of wonders what if?  You were up 4 at one point in time.
CAROLINE MASSON:  Not really, you know.  It's just the second round, so you're always going to make some bogeys and you just have to accept that.  You know, it doesn't matter when they come.  Maybe you start off with a few bogeys or you finish with a few bogeys, but still, overall I hit it well.  An even par round is fine and I'm still in the lead, so yeah, I'm just going to take it as it is and just look forward to the weekend.

Q.  The drive on 15, can you talk about was that a difficult drive?  It kind of goes left to right; correct?
CAROLINE MASSON:  It is a difficult drive, you know, because the wind is behind and there is a huge downslope.  So anything that carries that downslope or carries into the downslope is probably going to go into the water.  So I just hit it a little left, and I thought it was going to be fine.  It carried the trees, but I guess it just took a strange kick there and just went into the water.  I mean I couldn't see it, but yeah, you know, things like that happen, especially when it's windy.  And yeah, you just have to accept it, you know.  I was trying to make par.  I had a good chance for par and couldn't do it, but that just happens.

Q.  Did you hit driver?
CAROLINE MASSON:  Oh, no.  I hit rescue.  Yeah.

Q.  Caroline, going from yesterday to today at this point do you just call it a day or will you work on some fundamentals before you hit in?
CAROLINE MASSON:  I'm just going to hit a few more balls on the range because I wasn't happy with the last few drives.  But as I say, it's been a long day, and you know, just hit a few and just go home and have dinner and relax.

THE MODERATOR:  Caroline, you come from a pretty athletic family.  Kind of talk a little bit about your sports background and what lessons did you learn from your dad and from your brother in terms of handling ‑‑ you know, being in the lead or handling a tough day like today?  What kind of lessons have they kind of passed along.
CAROLINE MASSON:  Yeah.  My dad's a tennis coach, and he's always so positive, you know, which is great.  So every time I talk to my parents, especially my dad, he's so positive and even if I have a bad round or something, he's just like, oh, you know, you can do it tomorrow.  Just stay patient.
           
It's just good to hear that.  I think I'm really happy that my parents are not asking why did you do that or why did you do that, because that annoys me a little bit.  So they don't care, you know, really how I played or whatever.  They just always try to make me feel good, I think, and you know, it helps me a lot.
           
And he really knows ‑‑ I mean he was caddying at the Kraft for me and I played pretty good out there, so it's just nice to have him around me, because of that positive attitude.  And yeah, it's always good fun and I love talking to him about everything, life, sports.  Yeah.  It's good fun.

THE MODERATOR:  And with having a dad as a tennis coach, how did you end up in golf and not become a tennis player.
CAROLINE MASSON:  Well, I was playing tennis when I grew up, and I think it's a great sport and I loved it, but you know, golf ‑‑ I don't know.  I was better in golf.  And at some point I had to make the decision do I want to play tennis or golf or what do I want to concentrate on, and I was a little better in golf.  And running is not exactly my strength, so I thought, okay, I'm better off with golf.  And yeah, I think I made a pretty good decision there.

THE MODERATOR:  I was going to say, based on looking at the leaderboard, I think that's not such a bad thing at all.  Any more questions for Caroline?  All right.  Thank you very much and best of luck over the weekend.


Carlota Ciganda, Rolex Rankings No. 48

THE MODERATOR:  We'd like to welcome Carlota Ciganda back to the interview room today.  1‑under par 70, but you said you actually really played well today.  Just talk about your round.
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah, I started playing really good my first five holes, hitting really close to the tee.  And I even made those putts for birdie, but I birdied No. 4, the par‑3.  So I was 1‑under after six, and then I made two bogeys on 8 and 9.  I even hit the green and I couldn't make the putts, but then I played really solid the back nine, shooting 2‑under, and I think that's good because the conditions were not easy.  The wind is picking up and it was raining a little bit, so I'm happy with my round.

THE MODERATOR:  That was my next question, the conditions.  You're the first player we've talked to today.  Just how different was it today versus Thursday?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yesterday was windy, too.  Today the only thing it was more cold and it was playing a little bit longer maybe.  But I mean it's a course which it can be really windy.  It's not easy to putt well because it's uncomfortable.  They are big greens out there.  So just try to hit it as close as possible and then tried to make some putts.

THE MODERATOR:  Just if you would, just take us through how you got involved in the game of golf.
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  I started when I was five years old, so very young.  And I live very close from my golf course which is a small town called Lorenzo which is 20 minutes from Pamplona.  And I started with my dad and his friends.  They used to play golf every day, and I used to go with my dad all the time.  So I still play with them and they play really good golf and I really enjoy my time playing with them.  So it's great.  Thanks to them I'm here.

THE MODERATOR:  And just tell us, you mentioned to me on the walk up, your caddy is a very good friend of yours.  How does that relationship work?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah.  He's now my caddy; he's a really good friend of mine.  He is helping me a lot.  He started last year with me in Turkey.  So we have been for one year, and last year it was great, but this year has also been really good.  He's really close, always happy to help, and it's a big help for me because we travel together and it's very nice to have a friend always with you.  So I'm very thankful to Javi because he has a lot of patience.

THE MODERATOR:  And what's his name?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Javier Urquizu.

THE MODERATOR:  If we have any questions for Carlota, we'll take them with the microphone.  One more from me.  You mentioned for the last eight weeks you've been here in the States.  Obviously a little bit different than playing the European Tour.  What's your favorite thing about being over here and maybe any interesting experiences you've had since you've been traveling here in the United States?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah.  I've been here for the last seven weeks, and I really like the U. S.  It's a great country.  I studied here, and I mean I love it here because everything is easy.  I mean the courses we play, they are great and the people are very, very nice.
           
I just take my weeks off in Arizona, which it was really nice to go back there and see my friends.  And Europe, it's nice, too, because I am closer from home and I can go home in the weeks off.  But I love it here and I think the future is to be here.  So I'll be playing in the U. S. and Europe this year, and then next year I'll try to go more here.

Q.  You mentioned that some of the putts weren't going in.  If you look at your numbers, you had the same number of fairways, same number of greens.  Were there long putts you weren't making or some short ones you weren't making out there?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  I think they were hitting a little bit closer to the pin, so I made a few shorter ones, but then I also made two ones for birdie on No. 4 and 16.  So I would be happier with a few more putts if they would drop in.  But I mean I'm happy with my round.  I think I played similar to yesterday.  Just those putts that didn't go in, that's the difference.

Q.  What was the length on the long one?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  On hole No. 4, the par‑3, it was about five meters, about 16 feet.  And then 16, about the same, four or five meters.

Q.  And how much when you play in Europe, how does that affect your schedule over here and traveling overall this year?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah, I'm going to go next week back home.  So I'll stay there for one week, and then in May I'm going to play in Europe.  I'm going to play in Turkey, Holland and Germany, so I won't be playing here in May.
           
And then I'll come for the LPGA Championship for the women's in June.  And I'll play those three events, the LPGA, the one in Arkansas and then the U. S. Open.  And then I think I want to take some time off because otherwise the year is too long, and I want to keep looking forward to playing golf.

Q.  So you don't want to burn yourself out is what you're saying?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah.  That's right.  I mean this is my eighth week here.  I mean I love it and I love to compete, but I think you need to take some time off, go home, go out, have fun.  Otherwise it's too much.

Q.  That sounds like a very Spanish mentality to me.
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  I mean I think when you work, you need to put 100 percent and try your best, but then when you go home and just see your family, your friends, I think it's good to go out, to have some fun and party a little bit, too.  And then I think you are ready to play the next tournaments.

Q.  You went like 25 holes without a bogey.  How important is steady play like that, especially when it starts getting windy out here?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah.  I mean I think making putts really good because bogeys are very easy to make with these greens and then with the wind.
           
I was trying just to hit fairways and greens.  I didn't hit lots of fairways.  But I mean I was hitting good second shots and then hitting good putts.  Some they went in, some they didn't, but I was trying to be really patient.  And I think that's what I'm going to do over the weekend, just try to enjoy and stay patient and stay in the present and let's see how it goes.

Q.  Are the greens still fast and what kind of challenges have they presented so far?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  It depends on the wind, but I mean if you are putting downhill, they are very fast and then up the hill they are a bit slower, but I mean they are fast.

Q.  Did I hear that you're now working with Sergio Garcia's manager?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah.

Q.  Do you know Sergio at all?  Have you played any golf with him?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  Yeah.  We are good friends.  My dad is really good friends with his dad, so he came to two tournaments last year, so did his dad with me.  And we have a really good relationship.  Yeah, I love Sergio.  He's talented the way he plays.  And yeah, I am working with his manager, so I'm very happy to work with him.

Q.  You mentioned when you get away from golf you want to have some fun.  You made it clear to us yesterday you don't run with the bulls.  That's for the crazy people.  So what do you do when you get away and have some fun?
CARLOTA CIGANDA:  I go home, I like playing other sports.  I like tennis and a game we play, paddle.  I don't know if you guys have ever heard of that.  It's similar to tennis, but smaller courts with walls behind, and then it's very popular in Spain and Argentina.  I really like playing that.
           
And then I just like to relax at home.  I relax there with my family, with my brother, just go out with friends, have a good dinner.  I don't go out a lot, but I mean next week I'll go at least two or three days.


Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 1

THE MODERATOR:  We'd like to welcome Rolex Rankings No. 1 Inbee Park into the interview room.  Congratulations, another solid round out there.  Just take me through your day and what was really kind of the key to your round today.
INBEE PARK:  Yeah.  Today was a little bit more windier than yesterday.  So it was a little bit more challenging with picking clubs.
           
I didn't hit the ball as good as yesterday.  I mean I didn't putt as good as yesterday.  I mean looking at the scores, you can't tell, but a couple of those putts that I just read it wrong, and especially No. 8 and 9, the last two holes, I missed a couple five‑footers.  Just left a couple out there today, but still very close to the lead and looking forward to tomorrow.

THE MODERATOR:  I guess we've gotten so used to watching you just putt in everything, it seems, that you see.  How much was it just a mis-read on those last two holes or what were you thinking on those putts?
INBEE PARK:  No. 8 was just a very bad lip‑out.  I mean I had a pretty good putt, but it just lipped out.  You can't do much about that.  I haven't had that many lip‑outs in a while.  But it happens.  It was just one of those days.
           
And the last hole looked really straight to me, but it broke left‑to‑right, and yeah, I was really confident that it was going to go straight, but it was just a bad read, and yeah, it's all right.

THE MODERATOR:  Sometimes the breaks go your way; sometimes they don't, but it did go your way on the 18th earlier in the day.  Take me through that hole.  We saw the second shot hit the rocks and ended up getting a nice little break there.
INBEE PARK:  Yeah.  I thought after I hit the ball, I thought it was definitely in the water because I wanted to hit it to the left on the bunker side, but I hit a push and I thought it was definitely in the water but everybody clapped, so I thought I got really lucky and ended up with a birdie on that hole.  So it was very good.
           
And until that hole on the front nine I thought everything was going the right way, but back nine I didn't finish that strong.  But yeah, I got a good break on the front nine, a little bad break on the back nine, so it evens out.

THE MODERATOR:  Sometimes a lot goes your way and sometimes maybe luckier than good.  Overall as you head into the weekend, what's the plan and do you change anything about how you approach this golf course?
INBEE PARK:  No.  I think it's just really similar.  I mean yesterday was a lot less wind so it was a lot easier to hit more fairways.
           
Today it was a lot of left‑to‑right wind with left‑to‑right fairways, which was really tough to keep it in the fairways.  And yeah, if it blows a little harder, I think I gotta aim more left and hit it like left edge of the fairway and hopefully it ends up in the fairway.  And there was a lot of holes that I really need to hit it to the left side.  That was the toughest part.

THE MODERATOR:  Questions for Inbee?  In terms of the conditions out there today, like you said, the wind seemed to be a little tougher.  I also was talking to the other players who played in the afternoon and they said the course got a lot harder and firmer.  Is that something if this wind keeps up it's going to be a challenge over the next two days?
INBEE PARK:  I thought the course was playing quite harder from yesterday also.  I mean we were playing in the morning, but you know, it was playing quite tough and it was very firm, and I was getting like 50 yards of run every hole.  So I mean I think if the wind keeps up like this, it's going to get even more hard and fast on the greens, so I think it's going to be slippery.


Moriya Jutanugarn, Rolex Rankings No. 132

THE MODERATOR:  Good afternoon, everyone.  We'd like to welcome Moriya Jutanugarn into the interview room.  Congratulations.  A great 5‑under par round today.  Just take me through your day out there and what was really working well for you.
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  All right.  Thank you very much.  You know, I just want to go play today and like one shot at a time, playing my game.  So everything worked pretty good today.

THE MODERATOR:  The conditions out there seem a little tougher.  I know it was cold this morning.  How different was it today than yesterday?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  Yesterday I played in the afternoon, like 1 something tee time.  So yesterday it was pretty warm and it was better.  This morning is kind of freezing and cold, windy.  So I mean it's much different.  But yesterday I like missed some short putts for do whatever, like a little bit crazy.

THE MODERATOR:  Was there one key aspect to your game today that really was working well for you that got you?  Was it putting or were you hitting your shots close?  What was kind of the key for you today?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  I hit it pretty close like a couple times, like four feet or five feet.  So I make the putt from there.  And I think today the driver was pretty good keeping the fairway so it makes it easier.

THE MODERATOR:  You're an 18‑year‑old rookie out here on the LPGA Tour, originally from Thailand and you've been playing really well so far this year.  You're leading the points right now in the Rookie of the Year race with more than double the number of points of the person who's right behind you.  Was that a goal for you at the beginning of the year?  Did you kind of set your sights on being rookie of the year?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  I'm pretty surprised because I had a good start this year because before I start the tour this year, I kind of nervous a little bit because I don't know what is going to happen.  So it was really a surprise, and I try to work hard every time when I play and try to enjoy every time when I play.  Yeah.

THE MODERATOR:  So I don't know if everyone here knows, but you play professional golf and your sister also plays.  She's a year younger than you.  She's 17.  She's a rookie on the Ladies European tour, but she tried to Monday qualify this week and missed it by just a stroke, but she finished third last week in Hawaii and she's going to play next week at Kingsmill as a sponsor invite.  The two of you are both really good golfers.  Do you get competitive when you play with each other or kind of describe your relationship with your sister.
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  Just like every time.  I mean all the time, like everything else.  We really fighting and really competitive.  It's so much when you have a sister with you and practicing, you had a friend and you had good like competitor.

THE MODERATOR:  So I know last week you missed the cut in Hawaii and when she finished third, did she give you any grief about that?  Was she picking on you a little bit about how she finished higher than you?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  Yes.  Of course.  She's like, what are you doing, just inside joke, but I try not to think about what was wrong last week.  So I mean I call my coach and I try to figure it out.  So it works.

THE MODERATOR:  So what do you think has been the solution?  What did you figure out from last week to this week?  What have you made, changes?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  I try to shape my mind every time when I play golf.  Just like I'm really anxious sometimes.  So I try to relax, play one shot at a time.  So play my game.  Yeah.  

Q.  You had a bogey‑free round today but talk about how you kind of recovered, because I know late in the round yesterday you had three straight bogeys.  Talk about how you put that behind to do what you did today.
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  Like yesterday I had 3‑under and then I had three bogeys in a row.  It was kind of[] weird because I had ‑‑ I'm not really getting in trouble, but I just missed short putts.  That's it.  So after that I kind of make my confidence with very short putt.  And today is like just trying to keep going and play my game, one shot at a time.  You can do it all day long, you know.

Q.  What does your sister doing?  Is she hanging out with you here for the rest of the week or is she going back home?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  She left yesterday to Virginia because she had nothing to do.  She was like, I missed the cut and then I ‑‑ okay.  I left.

Q.  Can you just talk about the season and how you've been so steady and in addition to that, working on your putting and how that has gone?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  You know, I just try to play my game, like what is there, pin, I mean on the course.  So it's nothing like ‑‑ I don't have to ‑‑ I try to work hard everything like in my game.
           
But how can I say?  You know, like last week, putting or driver is not really work, so I try to work hard this week, so it's getting better.  So yeah, just keep in touch with my coach, call him every day.  Yeah.

THE MODERATOR:  Moriya, what's been the toughest thing about being a rookie on the LPGA?  Has it been the travel?  I know you traveled a lot playing golf event and stuff before, but what's been the hardest thing to get adjusted to as a rookie out here?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  You know, this year is kind of a big change for me because I just play from junior golf.  And it was like and at last to play professional golf.  It's a big change, but I enjoy it.
           
Happy that we have rookie hours that we have to play.  I mean we have to play golf practicing and then do the rookie hour.  But it's very enjoy.

THE MODERATOR:  Have you gotten used to made a lot of friends out here now?  Are you starting to feel comfortable out here, the routine of traveling everywhere?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  I have a lot of friends right now.  I go and say hi, but I try to make friends.  That's my part, make friends, enjoy the game.  That's it.

THE MODERATOR:  Well, it's working out well for you so far.  And it seems to be going into your results.

Q.  You are in today 5‑under.  Compared to yesterday can you just talk about is that way better today considering the conditions?  It seemed like the conditions were tougher today.
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  For me the condition is more tough than yesterday when I play.  But I can keep relax today and I play one shot at a time.  You know, yesterday I just had like something funny, like missed a shot by like three feet, that's it.  So only one thing I work on last night, I mean after the round yesterday.  Yeah.

THE MODERATOR:  Did you feel better about your game today?  Did everything feel like it was starting to kind of click, like yesterday or was yesterday everything feeling good besides the putting?
MORIYA JUTANUGARN:  Just the putting yesterday, yeah.  But today I try and focus with the short putt and just, you know, like do your best every shot.  So after the ball is off the face so that's all I can do.


Yani Tseng, Rolex Rankings No. 4

Q.  So 4‑under par.  Leader's at 7.  You're in the hunt.  How do you feel going into the weekend?
YANI TSENG:  I feel pretty good.  I hit the shots well, and I know this is course, sometimes you get lucky, sometimes you don't because when you hit good shot, you might bounce into the rough.  But you just need to be patient on this course, and I think I did for those two days, and I just need to make some more putts, you know.
           
I felt good out there and looking forward for next two days.

Q.  A lot of people like to talk about the state of your game and whether you're be No. 1 again.  Do you worry about any of that when you're out there or are you just out there having fun?
YANI TSENG:  No.  I'm just out there having fun.  I'm worrying too much last two years, so I'm not worrying anything about No. 1 or anything about ranking.  Now I just want to win a tournament.  Winning a tournament, if I'm No. 1 is good.  If not I'm still happy.  I think the ranking is just a bonus if you're winning.  So just try to go out there and try to win a tournament is the most important thing for me now.


Angela Stanford, Rolex Rankings No. 18

Q.  What are your impressions of your round?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Probably let one get away there.  I mean I had a lot of opportunities on our front side which was the back nine, and just missed a chance to get into a better position.

Q.  And you did put yourself in position quite a bit on the front.  I followed you through the front nine.  Was it reading the greens?  What was the ‑‑
ANGELA STANFORD:  Yeah, just I guess it was a combination of maybe not having the correct speed and not reading them properly.

Q.  And what do you think you need to do tomorrow to put yourself ‑‑
ANGELA STANFORD:  I guess I just have to keep being patient.  I think I probably lost my patience there in the end, and you know, it's a tough course with the greens and the fairways being this firm and fast.
           
You kind of have to be patient, and I thought I did my best, and I kind of lost it there in the end.

Q.  And the conditions were a little different than they were yesterday.  Was it especially with the wind?
ANGELA STANFORD:  Yeah, the wind, it blew from a similar direction, but I think it started blowing a little bit harder towards the end today.  So I think any time it blows like that later in the afternoon, it's just making things a lot firmer and faster.
           
And the ball for some reason was going a lot further later in the day, too.

Q.  Do you have to ‑‑ do you enter tomorrow thinking about what if?  Is that something ‑‑
ANGELA STANFORD:  No.  Just gotta get over it and keep going.  I don't even know what the leader is.  What's the leader?

Q.  7.
ANGELA STANFORD:  Leader's at 7?

Q.  She bogeyed three of the last four.
ANGELA STANFORD:  Oh.  So anybody's ball game now.

Q.  See, your whole attitude just changed.
ANGELA STANFORD:  It just changed like that.  I thought I was like 6 or 7 down.

 

 

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Masson, Caroline, Park, Inbee, Ciganda, Carlota, Jutanugarn, Moriya [+]

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