Pure Silk Bahamas LPGA Classic Second Round Notes and Interviews

Jessica Korda
Photo Credit: Rob Carr/Getty Images

Jessica Korda celebrates with caddie Kyle Bradley after putting out on the 18th hole during round two of the Pure Silk Bahamas LPGA Classic at the Ocean Club course on January 24, 2014 in Paradise Island, Bahamas.

Pure Silk-Bahamas LPGA Classic
Ocean Club Golf Course
Atlantis, Paradise Island, Nassau, Bahamas
Second-Round Notes and Interviews
January 24, 2014

Jessica Korda -11, Rolex Rankings No. 40
Paula Creamer -10, Rolex Rankings No. 13
Michelle Wie -9, Rolex Rankings No. 61
Jenny Suh -9, Rolex Rankings No. 518
Lydia Ko -, Rolex Rankings No. 4
Lizette Salas -7, Rolex Rankings No. 20

Two weeks ago, Jessica Korda made the decision to change her swing coach. It might seem like a quick switch considering the start of the 2014 LPGA season was right around the corner, but it appears to be working for the 20-year-old golfer. Korda fired a 7-under 66 on Friday to take the second-round lead at 11-under-par at the season-opening Pure Silk-Bahamas LPGA Classic.

Korda leads by one shot over Rolex Rankings No. 13 Paula Creamer, her playing partner for the first two days in the Bahamas. Creamer and Korda traded birdies throughout a very windy day at the Ocean Club Golf Course, as Creamer fired a tournament-record 8-under 65.

“The winds picked up within 30 minutes [of us teeing off],” Korda said.  “We went from beautiful, sunny, slight wind to cloudy and hurricane wind.  It was a tough day out there.  I mean, a little mentally draining because you really had to put everything into every shot.  Paula kept pushing me because she kept making birdies, so I felt like I needed to keep making birdies, too.”

Creamer began the day with a double bogey on the first but bounced back quickly, making birdie on each of her next four holes. She posted a total of 10 birdies on the day but needed to in order to keep up with Korda, who tallied eight of her own during the second round.

And while the weather was a story of the day, it really didn’t seem to impact this group. Creamer, who hasn’t won on the LPGA Tour since her victory at the 2010 U.S. Women’s Open, said she wasn’t bothered by the wind gusts which reached close to 20 mph for most of the day.

“I love playing in windy conditions, I always have,” Creamer said. “The more difficult, the better I feel.  We just really stuck to our game plan.  You have to be kind of a feel player out in these kind of situations and trust what you're doing and committing to your shots, and that's something that I really worked hard on in the off‑season doing, and it just kind of paid off today.”

Korda and Creamer are currently the headliners but there are a number of notable names up near the top of the leaderboard, including Michelle Wie who fired an 8-under 65 to move into a tie for third at 9-under-par. Despite a five-week hiatus from playing golf this offseason– even leaving her golf clubs back at her house in Florida during a trip home to Hawaii – Wie didn’t seem to have lost a beat with her golf swing. And it appears that Wie’s revamped putting style is likely here to stay as she needed just 28 putts during her bogey-free round.

“I think I just had a good rest this off‑season,” Wie said. “When I came back in January and I picked up my golf clubs, I was really excited to play.  I was so ready to get back into a rhythm. 
Monday qualifier Jenny Suh is tied with Wie at 9-under-par after shooting a 7-under 66 in Friday’s second round and 2014 LPGA Tour rookie Lydia Ko continued her strong play as a professional by following up Thursday’s 67 with a round of 70 on Friday to sit in a tie for fifth at 8-under-par.

But all will have to catch Korda, who is riding a wave of momentum after making some recent tweaks to her swing with new swing coach, Grant Price. Korda had struggled with her swing last year and felt that it had led to some injuries she was battling in her left shoulder and wrist. So the hope was that by making some changes, it could result in her staying healthier.

“It was just time for a change,” Korda said. “There was just stuff that wasn't working. I've worked with Grant before, so I was really comfortable going into it, and he's just super positive, and that's something that I really needed coming into this year.

“We're just working on keeping everything in plane and keeping it really simple to where if something does go wrong on the golf course, I can fix it myself.”

Lucky in Love: 10-year LPGA veteran Paula Creamer (-10) fired an 8-under 65 to finish the day behind only Jessica Korda (-11). Creamer attributed her quick start to the season to finding balance in her life this offseason, specifically her engagement to fiancée, Derek Heath.

“I am in such a great place;  I'm so happy,” Creamer said. “Derek just makes me want to be better, makes me want to be a better person.  This is my 10th year out here, and it's just kind of a refreshing new thing.  I needed something to kind of help with things.  It's always hard, life out on Tour as it is, but now being able to share things other than with my parents and Colin, it's been very exciting.”

Rollercoaster ride: Jenny Suh was admittedly disappointed this past December when she fell just short of earning fully exempt status on the LPGA Tour for the 2014 season. The top 20 finishers at the LPGA’s Final Qualifying Tournament earn their full LPGA cards for the following year. Suh finished in a four-way tie for 20th, but that meant a playoff for the final two spots and in the end, it wasn’t meant to be for the Virginia-native.

Suh, who still gained Category 17 status for 2014 with her Q-School finish, chose not to take it as a setback and  things started to look up for the 28-year-old. On December 19, she got engaged to her fiancé, William Britt. Then Suh decided to head with Britt to the Bahamas this week to try to Monday qualify for the season-opening Pure Silk-Bahamas LPGA Classic. She won the qualifier with a 5-under 68 and proceeded to carry the momentum into the tournament, shooting a 7-under 66 to move to 9-under overall and even held a share of the second-round lead when she finished play.

“It's golf,” Suh said of her mentality after just missing the chance to earn full status on the LPGA Tour. “I mean, I can't gripe about the fact that I missed the opportunity in a playoff or I missed it before by one shot.  That happens to everybody.  You can't be like, oh, if I would have made that putt I would have full status or if I made that putt I would have won the tournament.  Just coulda, woulda, shoulda.  I just left thinking, this is another year, we have a great opportunity.”

Everybody’s Working for the Weekend: A total of 71 players made the cut, which fell at 1-over-par 147

Can’t be stopped…Lizette Salas woke up on Friday morning wondering if her first LPGA event of the 2014 season might come to an early end. 

“I was in tears this morning,” Salas said. “I woke up with flu symptoms and high fever, and I wasn’t even sure if I was going to even play…I was working on a lot of stuff during the offseason, so I was ready to compete and was hitting it okay on the range, and just kind of took a deep breath and said, let’s play.”

The 24-year-old Southern California native didn’t let feeling under the weather or windy conditions keep her down. She shot a bogey-free, 6-under 67 to move into ninth place at 7-under-par. Riding a hot putter, Salas birdied the first three holes of her round and found a way to fight through the gusts of wind (and her illness) to move up toward the top of the leaderboard.

“When the wind kicks in, you just forget about mechanics and you just have to figure out where to start the ball and where the ball would end,” said Salas, who was still feeling slightly feverish after her round. “That's the type of golf I like to play.  I like to use my imagination, and that's exactly what happened today.  I wasn't really focused on mechanics or where the club should be at the top of my golf swing.  I was just feeling it today, feeling it and rolling it today.”

Quotable:
“Why not get the blood pressure going? “ – Jessica Korda on having to wait in the scoring tent after her round due to a fan calling in a possible rules infraction. Officials determined there was no infraction.

Tweet of the Day: “Raining birdies on LPGA....now LIVE on GOLF CHANNEL...nice rnds @ThePCreamer @jenny_suh @JessicaKorda” -- @Paige_Mackenzie, who is currently working for the Golf Channel in Orlando


Jessica Korda, Rolex Rankings No. 40

Q. Great round, 7‑under par today.  Quiet day when you got started early, and then the winds really picked up.  How were you able to continue to put low numbers up out there once the winds kicked in?
JESSICA KORDA:  Yeah, it was interesting.  The winds picked up within 30 minutes.  We went from beautiful, sunny, slight wind to cloudy and hurricane wind.  It was a tough day out there.  I mean, a little mentally draining because you really had to put everything into every shot.  Paula kept pushing me because she kept making birdies, so I felt like I needed to keep making birdies, too.

Q. Earlier start than normal for the LPGA Tour, much shorter off‑season.  How did that change your preparation, and when you have such an early start, were you expecting to be able to come out and shoot this well so early?
JESSICA KORDA:  I mean, it didn't really change my off‑season too much.  I started playing golf after Christmas like I usually do.  I usually go to Australia early, too.  This is kind of normal, maybe a week or two early, but yeah, I'm really surprised with how well I'm playing, and pretty happy about it, too.

Q. I know you've been working on the golf swing a little, changed coaches two weeks ago.  Talk a little bit about the decision making process behind that and what are some of the changes you've been making in your golf swing?
JESSICA KORDA:  It was just time for a change.  There was just stuff that wasn't working.  I've worked with this coach before, so I was really comfortable going into it, and he's just super positive, and that's something that I really needed coming into this year.

We're just working on keeping everything in plane and keeping it really simple to where if something does go wrong on the golf course, I can fix it myself.

Q. Who is your swing coach now?
JESSICA KORDA:  His name is Grant Price.  He works at IMG Academies..

Q. You said you went through some swing changes after the injuries you had.  What are you doing differently to keep you healthier?
JESSICA KORDA:  Like I said, just keeping everything on plane so I don't have to use my hands as much as I did, which is taking a lot of pressure off my shoulder and my wrist.

Q. You had a wrist problem that kept you out last year.  Was there also a shoulder issue?
JESSICA KORDA:  Well, the wrist problem was my right wrist.  I hit a metal pipe in Hawai'i last year, so that was completely different.  It was my left wrist that's been taped for basically almost a year and a half now.

Q. What is it about this golf course that really suits your game?  Is there something specific that seems to play well into it that's kind of led to the low number?
JESSICA KORDA:  I feel like I'm in Florida.  You have palm trees, Bermudagrass.  The views are just unbelievable out here, too.  It's really nice out here.  I can't complain.

Q. Can you take us through what happened at 15 and why somebody thought they should call in?
JESSICA KORDA:  Yeah, that was interesting.  15, I was on the side on the left, on the green.  Putted it up and went to go mark it.  I had maybe like two feet, two and a half feet, and just as I was bending down to go mark it, the ball moved back, and I got up, re‑marked it, and then just picked it up, and I guess they thought I addressed the ball, or I don't know what they thought or why they would call in.  But I had something happen at the British where I actually marked the ball and the ball rolled away and I had to play it as it lie without any penalties.  I knew that I was in the clear, I just had no idea what it was about.

Q. Just a little extra time in the scoring tent.
JESSICA KORDA:  Yeah, just why not get the blood pressure going.

Q. As you said, talking about you and Paula both playing well in the same group, what does that do for you when you've got somebody ‑‑ she started off with a double bogey and then started on a birdie binge, when someone else in your group is that hot do you just feed off of that throughout the day?
JESSICA KORDA:  Yeah, definitely.  Feeding off of her was good.  She made four birdies in a row after that, and it wasn't like she wasn't giving herself opportunities after that.  It was birdie after birdie.  It was awesome.  It's awesome to play with somebody like that because they really do push you and keep making you try harder.

Q. When the wind is gusting like this, what's the primary thing that you have to work on?
JESSICA KORDA:  I mean, into the wind, like 17 or 15, those are really, really tough holes.  You don't know what the wind is really going to do because sometimes going straight into, maybe a little right to left, you really need to try and flight it low, but you don't want to go too low or else it's going to go straight through the wind and then you're on the back of the green.  I think just communication with your caddie is really important and getting a good feel for it.  We had a lot of holes to get used to it, so that helped a lot, too.  In the pro‑am when we played it was gusting like this, too.  We played in it before.

Q. You've won out here; you know what that's like.  Just talk about striving for your second victory.
JESSICA KORDA:  Yeah, I got a really good taste of it last year to where I had two opportunities to kind of finish it off.  It hurt to not do that, but it kept pushing me forward to try and work harder and figure out what I can do to be better and try and win out here.  It's hard; these girls are good.  Like you said, it's tough to win out here, but I'm going to try my best.

Q. Who's your caddie, and where did you find him?
JESSICA KORDA:  His name is Kyle Bradley.  He's from Georgia, caddies at Augusta.  My manager found him.  He caddies out there for a bunch of guys before they come out and play the Masters.  I like his southern accent.  He keeps me calm out there.  He's a really good guy.  I mean, he reads greens really well with me, and we get on really well, so I can't complain.

Q. Seemed to work out pretty well so far.
JESSICA KORDA:  So far so good.

Paula Creamer, Rolex Rankings No. 13

Q. Congratulations, a great 8‑under par round today, which included a double bogey on the first hole.  So there were plenty of birdies out there for you today.  Take me through that first hole and then how did you recover so well after that to go on such a birdie binge?
PAULA CREAMER:  Well, I hit my tee shot left on 1.  It was kind of next to the cart path, and just hit it out and gave myself about a seven‑footer for par and I three‑putted.  I was above the hole, and I had about four and a half feet coming back, and I horseshoed it back right at me and walked away with a 6.

After that, hit a good tee shot on 2 and Colin said, okay, let's go, make some birdies, and I did.  I love playing in windy conditions.  I always have.  The more difficult, the better I feel that he and I work out on the course.  We just really stuck to our game plan.  You have to be kind of a feel player out in these kind of situations and trust what you're doing and committing to your shots, and that's something that I really worked hard on in the off‑season doing, and it just kind of paid off today.

Q. You weren't the only hot player in your group.  Jessica was in here talking about how much she fed off what you were doing.  Is it a good thing whenever you've got another player in your group that's kind of getting that momentum, too?  Do you feed off of that? 
PAULA CREAMER:  Yeah, you want to keep up with someone who's playing well.  You don't want to get too far back or anything like that.  But she was hitting the ball really well the last two days and putting really well.  You know, it's important to kind of keep your momentum going in either situation, if nobody is playing well or if somebody is, to keep going.  Yeah, when I'd hit a good shot, she'd hit a good shot, or vice versa.  If she made a putt, I made a putt.  It was fun.  That's kind of what you want out there, especially when it's this difficult.

Q. You were coming off a good season last year.  You seem to be working on a lot of things in your swing in recent years and things are coming together.  You also seem to be in a great place personally, just recently got engaged.  I see the very pretty ring on your finger.  What has that done for you, what's been happening in your personal life, to kind of carry over and show on the golf course?
PAULA CREAMER:  Well, actually I think I have to give credit to Randy Mell for the pro‑am that we had on Wednesday, showing off those great putting skills.  I think that's what I'm accounting this to.

No, I'm just kidding (laughing).

No, it has.  I am in such a great place.  I'm so happy.  Derek just makes me want to be better, makes me want to be a better person.  This is my 10th year out here, and it's just kind of a refreshing new thing.  I needed something to kind of help with things.  It's always hard, life out on Tour as it is, but now being able to share things other than with my parents and Colin, it's been very exciting.

You know, this off‑season was great.  I only took about a week and a half off from golf and just was working on my things that I needed to work on, but also at the same time it's the greatest moment of my life for sure this past off‑season when I got engaged.

Q. Can you go over the best moment of your life?
PAULA CREAMER:  How much time do we got here?

Well, I thought we were going to a winery, and Derek is very romantic.  He's like that, and I'm thinking, okay, well, maybe this is where it's going to happen, and then he pulls into this place, and I'm thinking, this is not a winery, and it was an indoor skydiving.  I said ‑‑ he goes, we need to be a little bit more adventurous.  I said, adventurous?  Indoor skydiving?  So I called my dad, can I even do this, am I allowed to skydive?  I'm in like a leather skirt, a blouse, I had heels on.  I'm like, I don't have any clothes.  He's like, you can change.  So we go, indoor skydive, and the next thing I know they're saying, okay, are you ready for your jump.  I'm like, what jump, what are you talking about.  There's the plane over there, and the guy I tandem jumped with was a Green Beret.  My dad talked to him, everybody talked to him.  His resumé was far enough beyond what anybody needed to call him, but that's the way it was, especially in my family being an only child and everything.

But there we went, and it was so romantic.  It was kind of cool.  I didn't think that it would be skydiving, that's for sure.  But he likes to be a little bit out of the ordinary, too.

But yeah, I was fine.  I would do it again in a heartbeat, skydiving.  You never feel like you're falling.  It's actually a really cool feeling.

Q. Was that a bigger plane than the one we were on flying in?
PAULA CREAMER:  Not really, no.  It was a prop one, too.  We beat it down.  It came like five minutes later after we made it.  Like geez, it had big jaws on it.  It was a big shark.  I'm like, why can't it be like an angel, something nice?  It's like this mean‑looking shark.  I'm like, I don't want to go up there and jump out of a perfectly good airplane that looks like Jaws.

It's pretty neat to be able to share stuff like that.  Not a lot of people get to voice kind of what happens in their life, and I've always been very private with everything, and people I don't even think knew I had a boyfriend.  But it is, it's been really fun, and being very open about it is kind of a new step for me, as well

Q. Did it happen after you got on the ground?
PAULA CREAMER:  Yes.

Q. So you couldn't read it from the sky?
PAULA CREAMER:  Yeah, I could read it.

Q. Did you think the proposal was out the window, you didn't think it was going to happen when you were getting on the plane?
PAULA CREAMER:  Well, what ultimately ended up happening was it was really, really windy and they wouldn't let us jump and everybody was leaving and we were the only ones getting into the airplane, and I'm looking at him thinking, why are all these extreme sports people leaving and we're going on this plane.  I can't put the two together.

We went up, and then we came back down, and all of our family was there, and we were able to ‑‑ then he proposed then, and then we went back up and we jumped and the signs were out and everything.

But I was thinking ‑‑ at that point I had no idea anymore.  I was too tired of trying to figure out what was going on and really trying to let me brain realize that I'm going to go jump out of an airplane, too.  There was a lot going on at one time.

Q. Wasn't that what you were going to do after you won an Open?
PAULA CREAMER:  I was going to do it at media day in Colorado.  I was going to jump with an Air Force team, and it happens to be he's in the Air Force, as well.

But no, it was too foggy.  The visibility, and then it was too windy this time.  I'm thinking, it's just not meant to be, guys.  It's okay, we've tries two times.  That's fine.  They're like, third time's a charm.  I'm like, I hope so, because there's a lot riding on this jump.

So enough about my personal life.

Q. You've always been a good iron player, but today you were just throwing darts out there.  Can you talk about anything you worked on in the off‑season that you were really pleased with how it was working?
PAULA CREAMER:  Well, I pretty much broke down my golf swing before we went to Asia last year.  At the time it was a really big decision to ‑‑ I've always been working on my golf swing, but this was something that I really needed to do.  Yeah, you could look at it and say, why do you wait for the off‑season to do what I was trying to do, but I wanted to learn to take it from the driving range to the golf course.

So I didn't finish off the year the way that I wanted, but I was seeing a lot of positive things happen.  My misses at that time were just so bad, and that caused a lot of my higher numbers and things like that.

You know, I just wanted to stick with those changes, and I put a new driver in.  I'm hitting the ball a little bit further than what I have in the past, in the last year.  But just really just trusting what David Whelan and I have been doing and playing a lot more.  I became way too technical, way too much wrapped up about my golf swing, which you have to do that when you're making those changes, but taking it from there to the course in the off‑season was probably the biggest thing.  I needed to become a player again, and I lost that for a while, and I definitely have found just assessing lies, things like that, I was so wrapped up about hitting on a flat lie, and I kind of forgot what we needed to do out on the golf course.

Q. What was it in a nutshell?
PAULA CREAMER:  Like the swing basically?  You know, obviously everybody looks at it and I lose my height, but I really lose my height in the takeaway.  Once you start going down, then the only way is to get steep and start cutting across it, and I was just pulling basically everything, but I was hitting it left to right, I was hitting cuts and fades.  It's easy for me to show you, it's hard for me to tell you.  But basically it's loading into my right side and making my hips bump more lateral, like this way, instead of turning, whereas that's what causes my right shoulder to get high, and I'm trying to keep my right shoulder low.  That way I can come more on plane, and then I can start it out to the right and hit those draws.

But the timing of that and the release, I am so on the negative with my angle of attack with my driver, that's why I'm a good iron player, but I needed to change that.  So I basically for a little while had two golf swings, trying to feel like I'm hitting it over a mountain and then trying to switch back to an iron swing, and it was really difficult, and the timing of it was the hardest thing for me.  And then, like I said, then going out here and playing left to right, right‑to‑left wind, stuff like that, basically just to keep my body behind the ball more might get my swing plane on path.

Q. Is the added distance off the tee more the swing tweaks or was it some equipment stuff?
PAULA CREAMER:  I would say it's both.  For sure golf swing.  I mean, I'm tall, I'm a strong girl.  I should have always hit the ball fart with my driver, but when you're hitting the ball down it's just spinning so much.  You're not going to hit it what I should.  I have long arms and my arc is wide, things like that.  I did put a new driver in, the jet speed TaylorMade, and then I put in the new Bridgestone RX ball, and for all those three things, yeah, it's going to go farther.  The good golf swing makes the equipment better, which makes your ball go farther, things like that.

Michelle Wie, Rolex Rankings No. 61

MICHELLE WIE:  I think I was on hole 14 or something where the leaderboard is, and I saw scores were really low today, and I thought, okay, gotta giddy‑up.  That's not good enough.
All of us played really well today in our group.  A lot of birdies in our group.  That I guess motivated me.  But it was just fun out there.

Q. Is there something you worked on in the off‑season that you were pleased with how it went today?

MICHELLE WIE:  Well, I just came off a really long vacation, so there wasn't really a lot to work on.  I think I just had a good rest this off‑season.  When I came back in January and I picked up my golf clubs, I was really excited to play.  I was so ready to get back into a rhythm.  It was good motivation playing this week because my first tournament was supposed to be in Thailand, and if I didn't play this week, then I would have just got into it slowly.  I kind of had a freak‑out session about two weeks ago, where I was like, oh, my God, I feel like I'm at a tournament.  I had a couple really good practice sessions, workout sessions, and I think it just kind of motivated me to do well.

Q. Also playing in a wind like this, it has to feel good because your swing has to be really fine tuned for that, right?  If it's a little off it gets more exaggerated?

MICHELLE WIE:  Yeah, for sure.  I mean, I guess I hit my ball pretty low, so it's not too bad.  But it's a great golf course.  I think it's fair, even with the wind.  It was fun.

Q. What are your first impressions of the Bahamas?

MICHELLE WIE:  Oh, I love it.  I absolutely love it here.  I can't believe I've never been before.  The color of the ocean is just unreal.  I tried to explain it to my friends and my family back home, and it's just ‑‑ you have to see it for yourself.  I tried to take a picture of it, and it almost looks like a filter, but it's just so turquoise, it's amazing.

Q. How were the dolphins the other day?

MICHELLE WIE:  Dolphins were awesome.

Q. Did you swim with them?
MICHELLE WIE:  Yeah, it was really cool.  We swam with ‑‑ we didn't swim with them, but we met the sea lions, as well.  They just had so much personality and they were so smart, and it looks like the trainers really treat them well.  It was fun.

Q. When did you do that?

MICHELLE WIE:  Tuesday.

Jenny Suh, Rolex Rankings No. 518

JENNY SUH:  I had a few tournaments leading up to Q‑school where I shot under par.  I talked to my fiancé and my parents, big picture, you're playing so much better, just enjoy yourself.

I'm 28 now, and leading into Q‑school I think he hinted towards engagement.  He's like, I don't know if this is going to be one of those years where you're crazy at Q‑school, but look at the big picture of life, and in the big picture of life this Q‑school won't really mean anything to you.  20 years down the road you'll have kids and everything.  So just look back and make sure you're able to smile and have fun.

Q. You say that this isn't your first rodeo.
JENNY SUH:  Well, I guess it's technically my third year with LPGA status.  In my first year in 2011 I was kind of outside the bubble, as well, where I was just trying to play my way in.  I think I made like two cuts, made a couple cuts coming in.  I got to like Wegmans, got to all the big tournaments, and it was basically like I had full status again.
If I've learned anything, I've got to get reshuffled and play really well so I don't have to go back to Q‑school.
Q. Shooting this kind of number is impressive enough, but on a day like today where it's gusting about 20, you have to really have good ball‑striking.
JENNY SUH:  Well, the wind didn't really hit us like this until the back nine, which was my front nine.  But the front nine I believe I shot like 4‑under.  It's like, we're ahead of the game plan, let's just keep it going, take the opportunities as they come, let's not try to be crazy, just hit the ball in the fairway, hit the ball on the green and make a putt.

Q. When exactly did you guys get engaged?
JENNY SUH:  We got engaged on December 19th.  That was my parents' anniversary.  He was brave enough to do it in front of my parents, and he's still alive, so I guess they really like him.

Q. How long exactly has Will caddied for you?
JENNY SUH:  He's been caddying on and off for me since we started dating, which was like three and a half years now, and like I said yesterday, we got into some arguments out there about this shot, that shot.  He would respond back by saying, I'm not a caddie, I'm your fiancé, you're not allowed to talk to me like that.  I'm like, you're right.  But it's kind of nice to have someone that keeps you in check out there.  Obviously if I had a normal caddie I would have talked to him and not said as many things as I said to Will and expressed how I'm feeling.  Will is better at reading me, and he can just bring me back down to the right level.

Q. What's his full name?

JENNY SUH:  William Britt.  He's been caddying on and off since we started dating.  It's not really his full time thing anymore.  I think I give him too many gray hairs to do that.  He's in real estate now in Florida, and of course I was like, I'd really like for you to come to the Bahamas with me to help me Monday qualify.  He's like, yeah, there's a casino.  I'm there.  I'll come with you.  I'm like, it's crazy you only come for the tournaments that have a casinos.  It's so weird.

Q. What was your mindset about Monday qualifying?  When you decided to do that, what's the mindset?
 JENNY SUH:  You just go it like any other qualifier.  You know that you don't have a second day to back anything up, to fix any mistakes, so you just have to stay on your game, have to be patient.  Once you do find yourself in a trouble spot, don't try to be all heroic, just take that bogey and get out.  That's what a Monday qualifier is, and you just make as many birdies as possible.

Q. Where do you guys live?
JENNY SUH:  Where do you guys live?

Q. Did you grow up in that area?
JENNY SUH:  No, we're both from Fairfax, Virginia.  We met before high school, because my team, they never qualified for regionals or states, so I would ask Will on the opposing team, can you come pick me up, and I would just sit on my doorstep just hoping that he would pick me up and I wouldn't get DQ'd for missing a tee time.

Q. Asking about that Q‑school experience again, when you finish, you're so close to getting that full card, and you're in that tie position and you're in a playoff, what's the mentality when you don't earn that spot?
JENNY SUH:  The mentality is it's golf.  I mean, I can't gripe about the fact that I missed the opportunity in a playoff or I missed it before by one shot.  That happens to everybody.  You can't be like, oh, if I would have made that putt I would have full status or if I made that putt I would have won the tournament.  Just coulda, woulda, shoulda.  I just left thinking, this is another year, we have a great opportunity.  If you would have told me going into Q‑school you're going to leave with status, not full status but some sort of status, I would have been like, oh, cool, that's great, that's awesome.  I just tried to leave happy.  You can't dwell on it too much. It’s just another tournament.  

Q. How many players for that last spot?
JENNY SUH:  It was four players for two spots.

Q. And what happened?  How many holes did you make it?
JENNY SUH:  It was an aggregate like three‑hole playoff, missed like a short putt on my second hole.  Wasn't able to capitalize on the third hole for birdie.  It was like a reachable par‑5.  I just made pars all four holes because it extended into another hole, and girls made birdies.  That's just what happened.  Can't do anything about it.

Q. So you had one person qualify after the three‑hole aggregate and then you went to sudden death for the other –
JENNY SUH:  And then one more qualifying, exactly.

Q. How is Will doing on the tables?
JENNY SUH:  I'm having better luck.  I'm having better luck out here.  Let's just keep it that way because sometimes he makes more money on the tables than I do at the tournament, so I'm like, this is a good sign.  I'll miss the cut, but it's okay, he'll get dinner.

Lydia Ko, Rolex Rankings No. 4

LYDIA KO:  Yeah, I kind of tried to think back to Swinging Skirts where I posted two good rounds there, and yeah, just continue that.  I was putting well, especially the three birdies in a row helped my day.

Q. That always helps.
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, birdies, and especially today ‑‑ I don't like making birdies on the first hole.  Well, I don't mind if I have it, but it doesn't end up being the most nicest day.  I try to say in the wind like this, I'll take any birdie I can get.

Q. How were the dolphins the other day?
LYDIA KO:  I didn't see it on the first hole, but then I came like halfway through and I saw they shot like 8‑under.  I was like, it wasn't that easy to shoot that kind of a low score, but obviously it was.  Yeah, a lot of the pins were at the front, which kind of gave more opportunities.  Yeah, I think the wind was slightly calmer in the morning, so that kind of made it easier.

Q. Was the course shorter, too?
LYDIA KO:  No, I don't think so.  I quite like this wind because the longer holes, most of them are actually a helping wind.  Yeah, I like this wind direction, which kind of made like a 3‑wood going in to like a 9.

Q. I want to ask you, working with Sean, has there been anything that you've been thinking about?  Did he give you any thoughts when he assessed your swing?
LYDIA KO:  Sean and David, they said don't think it too technical, and I was texting David, and I said, I'm just going to keep it simple, and he said, yeah, that's good.  I tried to only go in‑depth with this thing until like Tuesday and then just kind of let it go from the pro‑am days and go with how it feels.  I noticed when I got too technical I wasn't hitting it as good anyway.  I can't think about every little move on the course.  Yeah, I think that made me feel like kind of similar to how I did before.  It wasn't a huge change, just a little bit better.

Q. Was it setup or your swing or ‑‑
LYDIA KO:  A little bit of the setup, looking more comfortable.  I used to be more stretched out, so more, I guess, closer to the ball.  Yeah, Sean and David suggest keep it to the rhythm that you've been hitting, and I think that definitely helps.

Q. You said you were five back going into the weekend at Swinging Skirts.  Were those windy rounds?
LYDIA KO:  They were like really windy.  There was wind and rain two years ago, so luckily we only had the wind.  Yeah, the wind was like really, really strong, like 30 or 40 wind you had to add or minus.  Yeah, that's not easy, so I kind of wanted to put that into play.  No, I played a lot of golf in the wind when I was home, so I was disappointed at the British Open where I didn't perform as well.  But I played good at Swinging Skirts, so I kind of thought of that only.

Q. Because you like wind; is that what you're saying?
LYDIA KO:  I obviously did at Swinging Skirts, and I did today.

Q. So it varies?
LYDIA KO:  Yeah, depends if I play good or not.

Q. Do you have any school going on at this point?
LYDIA KO:  It hasn't started yet. It starts like at the end of this month, so it's very soon.  Yeah, I'm not even sure what subjects I'm taking.  I've got the New Zealand Open the next week and I'm home the week after, so I'll definitely go to school and see.

 

Lizette Salas, Rolex Rankings No. 20

LIZETTE SALAS:  I was in tears this morning.  I woke up with flu symptoms and high fever, and I wasn't even sure if I was going to even play.  I was in tears because I wanted to play so bad.  I was working on a lot of stuff during the off‑season, so I was ready to compete and was hitting it okay on the range, and just kind of took a deep breath and said, let's just play.  The breeze kind of helped a little bit staying cool, and I just stayed present and tried to hit as many fairways and greens as I could.  It obviously worked.

Q. You really gutted it out those last three holes
LIZETTE SALAS:  Yeah, I did.

Q. Made a great par save on 16.
LIZETTE SALAS:  Yeah, the closer we got to the water the more the wind picked up.  On 17 it was almost a three‑club wind.  I've learned over the years you just have to go with it.  You can't fight the wind, especially being so close to the ocean.  I just tried to enjoy it.  I said I'd rather not be in bed crying wanting to play instead of giving it my all today, and that's exactly what I did today.

Q. Do you feel better now?
LIZETTE SALAS:  Yeah, I think it's coming back, so I might need to take some rest this afternoon.

Q. You played really well in Hawai'i last year and now playing really well in the Bahamas.  Is there something about island golf that seems to suit your game?
LIZETTE SALAS:  I don't know.  I think you just have to play with the wind and use your imagination.  When the wind kicks in, you just forget about mechanics and you just have to figure out where to start the ball and where the ball would end.  That's the type of golf I like to play.  I like to use my imagination, and that's exactly what happened today.  I wasn't really focused on mechanics or where the club should be at the top of my golf swing.  I was just feeling it today, feeling it and rolling it today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Pure Silk Bahamas LPGA Classic, Ko, Lydia, Korda, Jessica, Wie, Michelle, Suh, Jenny, Salas, Lizette, Creamer, Paula [+]

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