RICOH Women's British Open Final Round Notes and Interviews

Mo Martin
Photo Credit: David Cannon/Getty Images

Mo Martin of the United States poses with the trophy following her 1 shot victory at the end of the final round of the Ricoh Women's British Open at Royal Birkdale on July 13, 2014 in Southport, England.

RICOH Women’s British Open
Royal Birkdale Golf Club
Southport, England
Final Round Notes
July 13, 2014

Mo Martin, Rolex Rankings No. 99, -1
Shanshan Feng, Rolex Rankings No. 9, E
Suzann Pettersen, Rolex Rankings No. 4, E
Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 3, +1
Jessica Korda, Rolex Rankings No. 18, +3
Laura Davies, Rolex Rankings No. 204, +4
Emma Talley, Sponsor Invite and Low Amateur, +6

Mo Martin had yet to record an eagle on the LPGA Tour this season. The diminutive 5-foot-2 golfer isn’t known for her length but instead for her accuracy.

Yet on the 72nd hole of one of golf’s biggest stages, the girl known as “Mighty Mo” delivered a shot for the ages that resulted in an eagle and made her a major champion.

On the par-5 18th at Royal Birkdale, Martin hit a three-wood that struck the pin. It left her with a six-foot putt for eagle and put Martin in the clubhouse at 1-under-par. With three of the best players in the game still on the course with a few holes remaining, Martin had to sit and wait for an hour before learning that she was the 2014 RICOH Women’s British Open champion.

“It’s still soaking in, along with the champagne on my jacket,” said Martin, who was doused by many of her fellow LPGA players after her win. “This is just unbelievable. It’s literally a dream come true.”

The 31-year-old American was the only player to finish under par at Royal Birkdale this week, shooting an even-par 72 in the final round on a day when the conditions proved the toughest of the week. Martin’s round of 72 tied for the lowest round of the day and gave her the LPGA victory that she had so long been seeking.

Martin spent six years working her way to the LPGA Tour. After winning three times on the Symetra Tour over that span, Martin finally made her LPGA dream come true as a 29-year-old rookie in 2012. And the man who was there cheering her the entire way was her grandfather, Lincoln, who passed away this past March at the age of 102. The two had become the best of friends and in memory of her grandfather, Martin wears an “L” necklace around her neck.

A well-liked journeyman pro who captures her first win at a major championship? It’s the type of Cinderella story that only happens every once in a while in sports and even those experiencing such an event are left slightly awestruck.

“Is this real life?” Martin said when she first learned that she had won.

The California native fell in love with Royal Birkdale almost immediately when she arrived here this week. After shooting 69 in the first round on Thursday, Martin declared that this venue ranked in the top 5 courses she had played. It certainly lived up to the billing and Martin’s strength of accuracy seemed to be an asset for her.

“Mo is a steady player on the LPGA,” Suzann Pettersen said. “Maybe not the longest, but on a course like this, you don’t have to be. It’s more about being precise and getting the short game sharp. So she must have played her game out, because we all tried to chase her down. We saw she was 1‑under in the clubhouse with three to go, and you know you’ve got to nail those three holes. It’s never a bad thing to post a good number in the clubhouse. We tried our hardest but fell short.”

The fact that Martin got to this point in her career is a testament to her determination. She was taught the game of golf by her father using “Hogan’s Five Lessons” since her family couldn’t afford lessons from a pro. She was a walk-on at UCLA thanks in large part of her grandmother helping her financially afford college. And Martin acknowledged there were times during her six years playing on the Symetra Tour that she had doubts about continuing on.

“Three things were my criteria to keep playing: I thought if I still woke up and I was happy in the morning; if I was still contributing to the women’s game and growing it; and three, if I was paying my own bills,” Martin said. “So as long as I was accomplishing those, then I was going to keep playing.”

Martin won’t have to worry about paying her own bills now with this victory. But more importantly for her, the win will allow the security of someplace that she holds very near and dear to her heart – her grandfather’s ranch in Porterville, Calif.

“His ranch is still there, and this win will definitely help keep it in the family,” Martin said. “We weren’t quite sure we were going to be able to keep the ranch, but it’s a very special place for me. It’s kind of my sanctuary and it’s to have all the memories that I have with grandpa and it’s an incredible place.”

SYMETRA HELPED HER EARN IT
Mo Martin played on the Symetra Tour (then called the Futures Tour) from 2006-2011 where she played in 104 total events, winning three times. While she was there, she also had 23 top-10 finishes. Her win at the 2014 RICOH Women’s British Open is the 44th LPGA Tour major title won by a Symetra Tour graduate.

Here is a summary of Mo’s 3 Wins on Symetra Tour
2007 – El Paso Golf Classic (El Paso, Texas)
2008 – USL Championship (Concord, New Hampshire)
2011 – Eagle Classic (Richmond, Virginia)

Martin qualified for the LPGA Tour when she finished third on the Symetra Tour’s VOLVIK (then J Golf) Race for the Card money list to earn Priority List Category nine for the 2012 LPGA season.

After her win today, Martin said that her first victory on the Symetra Tour helped her prepare for the conditions at the Royal Birkdale Golf Club this week.

“I love the wind.” Martin said. “I mentioned earlier in the week that my first win on Symetra Tour was in El Paso, and winds there were 30 to 40 mile per hour gusts. They called the tournament for the first time in tour history there.”

She battled the winds in England this week thanks in part to the hard work she put in for six years on the Symetra Tour.

THE SUNNY SIDE OF LIFE
Shanshan Feng had an opportunity to force a playoff with Mo Martin with a birdie on the 18th hole Sunday. Instead, Feng ended up in the greenside bunker in two on the hole and had to settle for a par after leaving the bunker shot short. And Feng ended up one shot shy of a chance at her second major championship.
But Feng walked away from Royal Birkdale not disappointed but rather happy with her overall finish.

“I missed a birdie, and after I finished, I look at the board and somebody is at 1‑under and I already finished so I knew I wasn’t going to win,” Feng said. “But this is my best finish at British Open so far. Before this year it was like 22nd or 26th or something like that. So I think I learned how to play the British Open.”

CHASE FALLS SHORT
A year ago at the RICOH Women’s British Open, Inbee Park fell short in her quest to achieve the elusive grand slam in a season. It appeared that perhaps karma would come around for Park at this year’s event by allowing her to reach the career grand slam with a victory at Royal Birkdale.

But the third-round leader came up short in that quest yet again, shooting a 5-over 77 in Sunday’s final round to finish solo fourth.

“I started thinking about it yesterday and this week I thought about it, because this is a tournament I really want to win and I really had a good chance today,” Park said of the career grand slam. “So I tried hard. Didn’t happen this week, so hopefully next time.”

Dame Impressive
Playing her first event in her home country since being becoming a Dame, Laura Davies turned back the clock and tallied a T9 finish, her first top-10 in a major since the 2005 McDonald’s LPGA Championship.

“I’ve played really well all week,” the four-time major champion said. “The first day was a bit disappointing because I played better than the score. But yeah, certainly getting off to that horrible start yesterday, 3‑over after two and coming back, that was probably one of the best rounds of the year, even though it was only level par, it was a good round. And obviously conditions today was so much tougher with the wind.”

Despite the tough conditions, Davies was able to post the second lowest score on the day with a 1-over 71 which included a birdie on the 18th for the fourth straight day leading to an ovation worthy of a Dame.

Davies, who earned $72,911 for her top-10 finish, will continue her quest to improve upon her LPGA status for 2015 and will also await the arrival of her investiture date.

“What’s happened in the past, when the CBE and the MBE I got, they send you some dates and you choose a date and you just hope it’s the Queen, because obviously it would be lovely to have her pin the medal on and meet her again,” Davies said. “So we’ll wait and see. Over the next few weeks I’m assuming I’ll find out a date.”

TALLEY LOW AM WITH DAD ON BAG
Emma Talley used a solid final round 73 (+1) to finish her first RIOCH Women’s British Open at 6-over and claim low Amateur honors.

“Going into the week all I wanted to do was play well,” Talley admitted. “I don’t know how the weather was going to work out for me and thankfully I had the first few days pretty good. So it’s very exciting. Making the cut was great and now being the top amateur was even better.”

The University of Alabama rising junior’s week was made even more memorable because her father Dan was with her every step of the way serving as her caddy.

“It was very special,” Talley said. “Last year we got to experience together winning the U.S. Am together so he’s very good at caddying for me. It keeps me calm and kind of feels like we are just playing at home for fun, which is good for me.”

With a top-20 finish at a Major, a U.S. Amateur victory, and a winning putt in Curtis Cup all on her resume in the past year many would think Talley would have her eyes towards the professional ranks in the near future but that isn’t the case.

“I want to finish school,” Talley explained. “I have two more years of school and hopefully after that, pro.”

SYMETRA TOUR ALUMNI WINS A MAJOR
Many will say that Mo Martin came out of nowhere this week to win the RICOH Women’s British Open but Mo has put in the work on the Symetra Tour for six years to earn this championship. The Road to the LPGA proudly posted a picture on Instagram of Mo hugging her grandfather Lincoln Martin after one of her three victories.

“Proud of Mo Martin! True inspiration who played 6 years on the #symetratour and is now an @lpga_tour major champion! #GoMo”
- Symetra Tour (@road2lpga) via Instagram

QUOTE OF THE DAY
“I’m so grateful like for everything; for the challenges, for the failures, for the successes. I just want to say that there are so many amazing people in this world, and not enough is said about the good people and the good deeds, and so many people do things unspoken, unspoken kindness. So many people have helped me when I’ve needed it. I’ve definitely had a few angels in my life.”
-Mo Martin when asked if she appreciates the 2014 RICOH Women’s British Open championship more because it was so unexpected.

EAGLES FOR A CAUSE
“Wounded Warrior Project® Weekends” is a season-long charity program that will be tied into the Race to the CME Globe. Each Saturday and Sunday at LPGA tournaments, CME Group will donate $1,000 to Wounded Warrior Project® for each eagle that is recorded. This amount will increase to $5,000 for each eagle during the weekend of the CME Group Tour Championship and a formal check will be presented to the Wounded Warrior Project® during the trophy ceremony at the CME Group Tour Championship.

Today, three total eagles were recorded to go along with the five total eagles on Saturday. It brings the total money raised this year to $192,000. Through the first 16 tournaments prior to RICOH Women’s British Open, $184,000 had been raised.

 

 

Mo Martin, Rolex Rankings No. 99, -1

COLIN CALLANDER:  Ladies and gentlemen, we welcome Mo Martin, the new champion of the Ricoh Women's British Open. How does it feel to be the new champion?
MO MARTIN: 
It's still soaking in, along with the champagne on my jacket.  This is just unbelievable.  It's literally a dream come true.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  When you arrived here in England at the start of the week, what was your expectation?
MO MARTIN:
  You know what, I didn't really have any expectations for this week in particular.  I mean, I fell in love with the golf course and I think anybody who enters the championship is trying to win it, and so that was definitely the intention.
           
But I definitely didn't expect this.

Q.  What was the distance on 18 and did you have any understanding of the significance of how far it could go when you made the putt?
MO MARTIN: 
The distance, you know what, I'd have to ask my caddie about that.  I don't think I even wrote it down.
COLIN CALLANDER:  You described it earlier as a full 3‑wood.
MO MARTIN:
  Yes, it was definitely a full 3‑wood.  I had a little bit of a left‑to‑right lie and also the wind was coming pretty strong.
           
So I aimed it very far left and hit it full, and held it up a little bit against the wind.  Yeah, when it was rolling on the ground, I said "Sit," and then I said "Go," and it looked perfect, so I didn't have anything more to say.  It hit the pin and I could hear it hit the pin from the fairway.  That was a pretty fun feeling.

Q.  Did you think ‑‑
MO MARTIN: 
No, I didn't, at the time.  I mean, there was so many players behind me, so much golf left to be played.  You know, standing on the tee box I was just trying to hit a good drive and that 3‑wood I was just trying to hit to the best of my ability, but no, I wasn't thinking about it.  When it hit the pin, I thought, okay, if that went in, that might have been pretty significant.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:   Any idea how long you hit the drive?
MO MARTIN:
  No, I don't know.  It was hurting a little bit left‑to‑right.  The drive, I don't know, maybe it went 240 overall.

Q.  Were you get information relayed to you when you were on the practise ground about what was happening on the course?
MO MARTIN:
  No, I didn't want to know what was happening.  I was fully prepared to go into a playoff.  I thought maybe I wouldn't even have that opportunity.  But definitely didn't expect to be the out right champion here.  But I was fully prepared to go into a playoff.
           
I didn't want realtime updates.  I just wanted to get prepared for possibly playing more golf.

Q.  Are you a good player in the wind?
MO MARTIN: 
I love the wind.  I mentioned earlier in the week that my first win on Symetra Tour was in El Paso, and winds there were 30‑ to 40‑mile‑per‑hour gusts.  They called the tournament for the first time in tour history there.
           
I love the wind.  I love working against the wind and having some fun with it.  And Kyle, my caddie, did a really good job of getting great yardages.  I mean, I think all week, I probably only hit two or three wrong clubs.  I mean, we did a really good job this week.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  What is Kyle's second name?
MO MARTIN: 
Kyle Morrison.
COLIN CALLANDER:  Good Scottish name.

Q.  Can you talk about your outlook coming into the day after yesterday, and maybe what was rough about yesterday?
MO MARTIN: 
Yesterday and thinking about it, I mean, I had a rough patch in there, but I played a lot better than I scored yesterday.  And it was a learning curve for me.  I had a camera behind me every single shot I hit.  That was a first.
           
So I think it was just a little bit harder to focus yesterday.  So today I just wanted to learn the most I could from that and continue on.  But strategy‑wise, game‑wise, nothing was different.

Q.  Can you talk about your transition to a standard length putter and when that happened?
MO MARTIN: 
That actually happened at St. Andrews last year.  My coach, Ian Triggs ‑‑ I actually just picked up a short putter and I rolled a few with it, and I think I made three in a row.  My coach just started laughing and I said, "What are you laughing at?"
           
And he said, "Your stroke's better with the short putter."  
           
So I said, "Okay."
           
He said, "Whenever you're ready, you'll know when."  He said, "I'm behind you a 100 per cent.  Go for it."  He said, "Whenever you're ready."
           
Well, actually, I've used a couple times, just a couple rounds over my life.  But I put it in for the Beijing event last year in China, and I think I had like 25 putts for a couple days in a row, which is a pretty good transition.
           
Callaway had putters out, so I think I may have actually picked up the putter I'm using now, the Tank, the Odyssey Tank.  I rolled a few just to see what he thought because I knew I would have to make that transition coming up in the future and I just didn't know when I was going to do it.
           
So I just wanted to see what he thought.  I don't have him out here all the time.  He only comes out to a couple events.  I wanted his eyes when I had them.

Q.  I appreciate you've not had much time to think about this, but what will you do to celebrate?
MO MARTIN:
  You know what, I have no idea.  I'm going to have to tell you that tomorrow.  I was just planning on driving to Manchester and having a quiet dinner and flying out tomorrow morning.

Q.  Quick look ahead to next year, have you ever played Turnberry?
MO MARTIN: 
No, I haven't.

Q.  But you'll be there?
MO MARTIN:
  Yes, God willing.

Q.  Have you thought of what this is going to do for your career?
MO MARTIN: 
No.  I mean, I'm just grateful for having the career I have.  I mean, I'm just grateful for ‑‑ I mean, I live the dream every day.  No, I haven't thought about much at all.

Q.  Have you made any calls home yet?
MO MARTIN: 
No, I haven't.  I haven't even looked at my phone since this morning.  I'm sure I'm going to have a lot of messages from a lot of people.  And I'm very fortunate, I have so much support.  Over the years, so many people have come together to help me when I needed it.  I'm very fortunate.

Q.  You're probably not aware of this, but, in fact, at the end of this month, this club celebrates 125 years of its existence, so this is a particularly special month for us, as it is for you, and thank you very much for marking it in a very dramatic way.
MO MARTIN:
  It's been a pleasure.  I'm honoured.

Q.  You've talked a lot about support today.  Can you give us an example:  Financial, emotional, can you give any specific examples of what's meant a lot to you?
MO MARTIN:
  We didn't have a lot of money growing up.  My dad taught me from Hogan's Five Lessons, and he built a cage in our driveway.  So we couldn't afford lessons.  So he knew it was going to be a great sport, so he taught my brother and I.
           
So just financially speaking, a lot of people throughout the years came together to help me continue playing.  So I mean, I wish I could thank everybody right now but they absolutely know who they are; just to get me into junior tournaments and to help me travel, and the opportunity to walk on at UCLA.  My grandma helped me through that first year.  So many people have come together.

Q.  As long as it took you to get out here to the LPGA, was there ever a moment where you almost quit or almost couldn't go on, I guess?
MO MARTIN: 
I guess, yeah, I had ‑‑ three things were my criteria to keep playing:  I thought if I still woke up and I was happy in the morning; if I was still contributing to the women's game and growing it; and three, if I was paying my own bills.  So that was my criteria.  Those are my three things.
           
So as long as I was accomplishing those, then I was going to keep playing.

Q.  Did you almost not be able to pay bills or did you almost wake up grumpy?
MO MARTIN:
  Everybody has those days (laughing).

Q.  I think you took care of all three of those today.  How did you hook up with Triggsy?
MO MARTIN: 
That's a funny story.   Let's see, when was it ‑‑ two years ago, the Australian Open before this ‑‑ so, yeah, last year.  This is my second season working with him.
           
I didn't have a good week and I was just frustrated with my ball‑striking, and I was hitting balls on range.  He was there, of course.  He has a lot of Australian players and other players out here.  I wanted to just see if he would have five minutes.
           
I remember I wanted to do it but I was a little bit shy and I was like, this is kind of awkward.  And Kyle said ‑‑ he had said to me, specifically, my caddie, he said, "Do it.  You won't regret it."
           
I said, okay, fine.  I just went over and said, "Hi, I'm Mo Martin."
           
And he was so polite.  He took off hit hat and said, "Hi, I'm Ian Triggs."
           
I said, "Do you have five minutes?"  I said, "Would you take a look?"
           
And he said he was quite busy, but he said, "If you'll be here this afternoon," he'll come back.
           
So I really want to thank him for taking a chance on me, too.
           
COLIN CALLANDER:  You mentioned your grandfather the other day.  Am I right in saying he was 101 when he passed away?
MO MARTIN:
  102.
COLIN CALLANDER:  What was his name?
MO MARTIN: 
Lincoln Martin.  He was born on Lincoln's Day, 2/12/1912, and so he was named after Lincoln.
COLIN CALLANDER:  And he played a special part in your life?
MO MARTIN
:  Yeah, he changed my life.  He made everything so much brighter and better.  I miss him but I'm so grateful that I had the time I had with him.  I'm incredibly blessed.

Q.  I hope this isn't a bad question but I read a story in San Diego a couple years ago that when you first met him, you walked in into his room that there was a shrine that you didn't know existed.
MO MARTIN: 
Yeah, family dynamics are funny.  My dad didn't really have a relationship with him. My grandpa didn't agree with some things he did.
           
So when my dad passed away when I was 19, I knew my grandpa was somebody I really wanted to get to know.  So I made a trip up to his ranch and I walked into his office and there were newspaper articles and pictures.  I started crying, I was overwhelmed, because I didn't know he was that involved in my life.  Like he was just a silent follower, but he was caring and loving me all the time.

Q.  What did you know about him that made you want to get to know him since you had no real connection with him?
MO MARTIN: 
He was very kind, very gentle.  I don't know, I guess just a feeling.

Q.  And since his passing in March, what's going on at his house or his ranch?  Is the shrine still there?
MO MARTIN: 
His ranch is still there, and this win will definitely help keep it in the family, which has been absolutely ‑‑ it's been what I wanted to happen.
           
We weren't quite sure we were going to be able to keep the ranch, but it's a very special place for me.  It kind of my sanctuary, and it's nice to have all the memories that I have with grandpa and it's an incredible place.  It's in Porterville, California, sleepy town.
           
My aunt marry did a tremendous thing and she made the big effort, I think it's almost finalised, to keep it in the family.  But I will definitely be able to help keep it now; and we need a new roof and things like that.

Q.  I'm sure you've managed hundreds of albatrosses in practise rounds; is that as close as you've come in a competitive tournament?
MO MARTIN:
  100 per cent, definitely.
           
A friend of mine and fellow competitor, Vicky Lang, made a 2 on 17 a couple days ago, so maybe I had that in my mind.

Q.  She's a pal of yours?
MO MARTIN:
  A friend of mine.  She plays on the LET.  She was competing this week.

Q.  But that's as close ‑‑ a double‑eagle?
MO MARTIN:
  Correct.

Q.  A moment like this, do you think you appreciate it all the much more considering that you didn't turn pro at 18, superstar out of college, boom, here you are type thing?
MO MARTIN: 
You know what, that's hard to say.  It definitely lowered my expectations, but I think I'm ‑‑ I mean, I don't know if this was my family or just my upbringing or me.  I'm so grateful like for everything; for the challenges, for the failures, for the successes.
           
I just want to say that there are so many amazing people in this world, and not enough is said about the good people and the good deeds, and so many people do things unspoken, unspoken kindness.  So many people have helped me when I've needed it.  I've definitely had a few angels in my life.

**************

Q.  Just describe the events and the closing stages of that round.
MO MARTIN:
  Well, it was a tough day of golf today.  I mean, it was very windy and this course is very challenging.  So stayed patient and I fortunately played some really good golf today.

Q.  You certainly played some great golf at the 18th.  On the tee you were two shots behind.  What was in your mind?
MO MARTIN:
  Just my drive.  I picked the left side, so I had to hit it up the left side and let it feed up a little bit right.  That was the strategy my caddie, Kyle, and I had all week.  My second shot there is one I'm always going to remember.

Q.  I think we'll all remember.  You under‑clubbed the day before.  What was this?
MO MARTIN:
  This was a full 3‑wood.  It was off a little bit of a left‑to‑right lie, which let it feed.  At this point I'm saying, "Sit."  And then I said "Go," and then I said ‑‑ "I don't know what else to say."  I actually heard it hit the flag, and that's when I just said, "Oh, my God."

Q.  One of the greatest shots of your life, isn't it?
MO MARTIN:
   Yeah, absolutely 100 per cent.

Q.  And standing over the putt, knowing this could be decisive, not only for your career but for this championship.
MO MARTIN:
  Same thing.  I wanted to get the best read on it, put a good stroke on it and I did.  I wasn't quite sure about my lines.  I backed off once and it went in.

Q.  We could see what it meant to you.  Your best finish in a major has been in the Top‑30, I think a tie for 29th earlier this week.  What's made the difference this week?  Why has it all come good?
MO MARTIN:
  From first time I saw Royal Birkdale, I fell in love with it .  I think the layout is absolutely phenomenal.  I think the officials this week, we were talking about if I was ever in this position, or when I was, I would actually thank ‑‑ Kyle instead, my caddie, but that didn't quite work out.
           
Love the golf course.  Kyle and I put some really good work in.  I want to thank Ian Triggs, any coach are for having faith in me and my sponsors, too, CME Group, Trader Joe's, and RICOH, it's been a fantastic event.

Q.  That was special.  Talk us through the 18th.
MO MARTIN:
  Yeah , that was phenomenal.  On the tee box I was just thinking about my drive, thinking about putting it in the same position I've been in the last three days and I was able to do that.  That was perfect.
           
Actually the lie complemented the shot I was hitting in, a little left‑to‑right breeze, and so hit an absolutely perfect 3‑wood.  When it was in the air, I said, "Sit," and then I said, "Stop," and then when it going towards the hole, I said, "Okay, I don't have anything more to say to that ball."
           
I actually heard it hit the pin.  It's definitely one to remember.

Q.  You looked so happy after sinking that final putt.  Talk through the emotions after a pretty incredible week?
MO MARTIN:
  You know, what it's all sinking in right now and clearly I don't know what's going to happen.  There's still some golf left to be played behind me but either way I'm ecstatic about my preparation and strategy and the way I was able to execute.  Kyle Morrison (ph), my caddie, helped me a ton out there.  He's a great emotional support, as well.  Keeps me on the level.  It's just wonderful.  I'm really happy.

Q.  How pleased are you with this week and what are you going to take out of the golf that you've played?
MO MARTIN: 
This is definitely one to remember.  I mean, I don't know what's going to happen but this has just been a confidence boost and it's been a lot of fun.
           
So I just want to thank my family, friends.  I had a lot of fellow players that came out to support me there at the end.  It was so nice to have them there, CME Group and Trader Joe's, my sponsors, for having faith and supporting me, and RICOH has put on an absolutely fantastic event.

Q.  This has exceeded probably your expectations coming into the tournament.  Where did this golf you've been playing come from?
MO MARTIN:
  Yeah, I mean, this is definitely a first, but there's always got to be a first for everything.  So I really just worked really hard, focused my mind and I have a really good support system around me.  I just want to thank everybody that helped make this possible, because you don't do it alone.

Shanshan Feng, Rolex Rankings No. 9

Q.  Can you tell us about your thought process on the 18th?  Were you aware of the situation when you were going for the green?
SHANSHAN FENG: 
Not really.  I hit a very good drive and forced my second shot, missed it in the bunker.  Missed a birdie, and after I finished, I look at the board and somebody is at 1‑under and I already finished.  I knew I wasn't going to win.  But this is my best finish at British Open so far.  Before this year it was like 22nd or 26th or something like that.  So I think I learned how to play the British Open.

Q.  How tough were conditions for you and everyone else today?
SHANSHAN FENG:
  It was windy.  But I think we were being lucky because the first three days, we didn't have much wind.  So I think it's fair to just have one day of big wind.
           
I thought I handled it pretty well the whole way.  Of course I had a couple of 3‑putts with the wind, but I think 3‑over is not a bad score today.

Q.  Had you known your situation standing on the 18th tee, would you have played that last hole any differently, because you had made birdie the previous three days.
SHANSHAN FENG:
  No, I didn't play any differently.  I stick to the same plan, tried the 5‑iron, tried to hit it on the green.  But just misjudged about the wind.  It was moving a little more right.

Q.  Your first Top‑20 in the Ricoh Women's British Open but it could have been a victory.  Do you walk away disappointed?
SHANSHAN FENG:
  Not really.  My best finish here was maybe like 26th, and before I came, I was like, I wanted a Top‑10 so badly.  But I always struggled at the British Open somehow, and I don't know if I'm finishing second or third, but it's my best finish so far, and I think I learned how to play the British Open.  So I think I learned a lot.

Q.  Did you know where you stood coming down the stretch?
SHANSHAN FENG:
  Not really.  Well, I have a habit that I don't look at the boards like during my play.  So I didn't know, like somebody finished at 1‑under already, so I was still going for my birdie or eagle on the last hole.  But of course I missed it but I tried my best and I'm not disappointed at all.

Q.  You had a chance to get in the playoff with that putt at 18; was it just a misread, bad pace?  What happened?
SHANSHAN FENG:
  It was a misread.  Well, you know, the greens here are really hard to read, and I missed ‑‑ well, actually, I read most of them right.  So I think I did pretty okay until the last three or four holes I misjudged like on the greens.  But I think I still did okay.

Q.  And just finally, your thoughts on Mo Martin, a player who has never been in this situation, and suddenly, now, she's played so well here this week.  It's pretty incredible.
SHANSHAN FENG:
  Well, I just saw her on TV.  She was warming up and I guess she just needed to warm up and she's going to win.  She was leading after two days, and I thought everybody actually wanted her to win because she's kind of a short player and on the LPGA, there are so many long hitters, and she's proving to us that you don't have to be real long to win like a major.  And she's so nice and she's always a very good player.  So I wanted her to win.

Suzann Pettersen, Rolex Rankings No. 4, E

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  Today was tough.  I thought it was most challenging on the greens actually.  The wind on your body, the pace, just got a little bit off and I just hit a little bit too defensive short putts.
           
But overall, I'm back, feel like I'm in a good spot now, and to be one short is always very disappointing.  But hats off, everything off for Mo to take off with the British Open championship.  I mean, well, well deserved, and I heard she had an eagle on the last to good way to finish a great championship.

Q.  Just talk about Mo Martin, how much does this surprise you?  Obviously you respect her now that she's won a major, but how much does it surprise that you Mo is the champion here?
SUZANN PETTERSEN:
  Mo is a steady player on the LPGA.  She plays every week.  She's a pretty steady hitter.  Maybe not the longest, but on a course like this, you don't have to be.  It's more about being precise and getting the short game sharp.
           
So she must have played her game out, because we all tried to chase her down.  We saw she was 1‑under in the clubhouse with three to go, and you know you've got to nail those three holes.  It's never a bad thing to post a good number in the clubhouse.  We tried our hardest but fell short.

Q.  Even par for the championship, tied for second.  How pleased are you with your finish?
SUZANN PETTERSEN: 
Well, I tried my hardest.  I knew I needed a birdie and eagle to tie Mo in the clubhouse.  I tried my hardest; one short.
           
My game is right back where I feel like I belong and obviously very disappointing to be one short.  But it was tough out there today and it's hard to say kind of where you could have picked up that one shot or another, because you try your hardest and you try to make every putt, but my putter probably let me down on a couple of occasions today.  It's tough with the wind in your body and you feel like the wind ‑‑ adjust for the speed.
           
Overall, decent.  Hats off for Mo Martin who got her first major championship.

Q.  What do you think of Mo Martin winning?
SUZANN PETTERSEN:
  Mo is probably one of the most popular players on Tour.  Very happy for her and I'm sure she's going to have a heck of a party tonight with all her friends on Tour.  Hopefully she'll be in for many more championships to come.  Very happy for her and disappointed for myself to be one short.

Q.  And how taxing is the wind and the conditions mentally?
SUZANN PETTERSEN: 
It is tough.  I mean, I started off with a double‑bogey and you still know you're right in it.  It says everything about this golf course.  It's harder to recover from big numbers today with these conditions, so the damage is a little bit more harsh to say that way, but you try your hardest and that's all you can do.

Q.  I was talking to your swing coach, David Leadbetter, earlier, and he said you were there and finally your health is back.  Do you feel like you're close?
SUZANN PETTERSEN: 
Yeah, this is right where I want to be.  This is a great test.  This was like almost my second tournament back where I was really in contention.  I hit a lot of great shots.  I don't know if I want to go out and hit any shots over except for a couple, but overall I feel it's nice to feel that the feel of my game matches my result.  It's a good direction and hopefully I can be in contention for more this year.

Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 3, +1

Q.  When you made the turn heading into the back nine on Sunday, you were in control of this championship.
INBEE PARK:
  On 10, I thought the grass was going with me and I thought I had a decent lie.  I just hit a pitching wedge there and it just really grabbed it.  I didn't hit many shots out of the rough this week, so I didn't really know what it was going to do.  Just looked good and I gave it a try.

Q.  Were you thinking about the career Grand Slam coming down the back nine?
INBEE PARK: 
Yeah, I started thinking about it yesterday and this week I thought about it, because this is a tournament I really want to win and I really had a good chance today.  So I tried hard.  Didn't happen this week, so hopefully next week.

Q.  Your thoughts on Mo Martin, this is a pretty big surprise win.
INBEE PARK: 
Yeah, obviously she eagled the last ‑‑ that's an amazing finish.  I guess this golf course really suited her eye and she played well for four days.  She played better than everybody else.  She played fantastic.

Q.  Walking away do you feel like you let this one slip through your fingers?
INBEE PARK: 
Yeah, definitely I think today I could have shot at least three or four shots better.  It just didn't happen ‑‑ my putter, just nothing seems to be going in today.  Obviously the back nine was really disappointing.

Q.  I know how much you wanted it and you were right in with a shot coming into the last couple holes.  Didn't quite come together.
INBEE PARK: 
Yeah, just the whole back nine, it just didn't go the way I wanted to.  I made a lot of mistakes on the back nine.  Especially 17 and 18, there was definitely a birdie opportunity, but I just let it go.
           
The last hole was obviously very disappointing.

Q.  Along with the disappointment, is there a bit of confidence and hope for the next time around that you gave it another close shave?
INBEE PARK: 
It's good that I came close to winning this time.  I was just so close this time.  Hopefully it means something for next year.  I try to learn from my mistakes what I made this year, and hopefully yeah, I don't make the same next year.

Q.  Was there anything specific that made the difference that stopped you from just quite getting there or just a general?
INBEE PARK:
  I've got to say, it's No. 10, double‑bogey was stopping me from having a go at it.  Yeah, I thought I had a good lie and I tried to go out from there.

Q.  So you thought you could make it and get on to the green?
INBEE PARK:
  Yeah, I only had 100 yards, so it wasn't long.  I tried to just punch it out with my pitching wedge and it just really grabbed it.

Q.  Fourth place, do you feel like you left a few out there?
INBEE PARK: 
Yeah, it was just a little bit disappointing day obviously.  I really battled through the front nine but just the back nine, nothing seems to be going my way.  Made a lot of mistakes that I really didn't need to make.  Obviously the last hole, drive was really disappointing.
           
Today was a tough day for me but I gave it a hard try and just didn't work out.

Q.  What part of your game do you think failed you?
INBEE PARK:
  My ball‑striking was good today but just my putter didn't work out today.  I was missing opportunities.  I was missing par putts.  Yeah, just it wasn't really there.

Q.  What are your emotions now?
INBEE PARK:
  Just what's gone past is past.  I just have to forget about what's happened today and move onto next week and just try to play my golf.  I still played great.  Not a great back nine on this last day but other than that it was good.

Q.  Do you feel like you want this championship more since it's eluded you?
INBEE PARK:
  Yeah, I came really close this time, so hopefully it's some kind of sign for next year.  Hopefully I can give it another try for next year.

Q.  Are you going to be able to celebrate your birthday at any time?
INBEE PARK: 
Yeah, it's already gone but I think I can.
           

 

Jessica Korda, Rolex Rankings No. 18, +3

Q.  You are inching up leader board.  Just express and plain to everybody how tough a day this is at the office?
JESSICA KORDA:  Oh, it's incredibly tough.  Not only mentally tough but it's tough on my caddie, because you might have a number set in mind but you don't nowhere that ball is going to go.  You are starting them outside the greens and just praying to God that it's going to come back to the green.

Q.  We've seen a couple of the balls coming backwards after they have been hit.  It's getting quite tricky out there.
JESSICA KORDA: 
Yeah, it is and it's not easy on the greens either.  You're standing over a putt and the ball is kind of oscillating a little bit.  The gust of wind is not pleasant out there.  I'm very glad I'm done.

Q.  How close do you think this could be by the end of the day?
JESSICA KORDA:
  You know, the last holes coming in are pretty tough.  The wind seems to be picking up which is incredible, because it is blowing very hard out there, and I think it's going to be a close one.  The girls have to really keep the ball in play.

Q.  Did you consider you were closing in on the leaders ‑‑
JESSICA KORDA: 
I didn't even care.  It's so hard out there.  It is so hard out there.  Even putting, I had so many opportunities.  10 I could have birdied; 11, I could have birdied.  But a gust of wind caught me and it catches the putter and the putter goes zigzag and you can't stop it.
           
I looked at the leaderboard and I see Inbee is I think even par or 1‑over, incredible.  It's so tough out there.  Not only tee shots from the fairway, keeping it in the fairway, the balls are rolling out, fairways are starting to get very firm as well.
           
So you might think you hit a great shot and all of a sudden you're in the bunker and the rough and you didn't do anything wrong.  Same thing on the greens.

I think 17th green is so baked out right now, it's the fastest green on the golf course.


Laura Davies, Rolex Rankings No. 204, +4

Q.  Leader in the clubhouse in your 30th appearance in this great championship, just reflect on your play this weekend and indeed in your 30th appearance.
DAME LAURA DAVIES:  Yeah, I've played really well all week.  The first day was a bit disappointing because I played better than the score.
           
But yeah, certainly getting off to that horrible start yesterday, 3‑over after two and coming back, that was probably one of the best rounds of the year, even though it was only level par, it was a good round.  And obviously conditions today was so much tougher with the wind.

Q.  How hard was it out there?
DAME LAURA DAVIES
:  It was tough.  I think the first two holes I hit 2‑iron for my second shot into the first, 3‑iron second shot into the second and that's par 4s, not par 5s.  That's normally a different game.
           
It was a lot of long irons.  A 5‑iron into 16 came up short.  So you've got to hit your long irons well out there today.

Q.  As we speak you're in 18th position, but how much better do you think that could be over the coming hours?
DAME LAURA DAVIES:
  Just depends.  17 and 18 at the moment are playing cross wind and that's where everyone has been making their scores.  If they stay crosswind, it's not an easy birdie.  I struggled in 17, hit it in one of the fairway bunkers and struggled for a par.
           
You just don't know.  Certainly if the wind keeps up, which I hope it does, because I'm a nasty person like that.  It would be lovely because obviously I need as much money on the Money List to keep my card in America.  So this could be a good week if I could stay at 18th and get better.

Q.  You're certainly a Dame with game; when is the investiture?  Have you been told when you're going to go to the Palace?
DAME LAURA DAVIES:
  No.  What's happened in the past, when the CBE and the MBE I got, they send you some dates and you choose a date and you just hope it's the Queen, because obviously it would be lovely to have her pin the medal on and meet her again.  So we'll wait and see.  Over the next few weeks I'm assuming I'll find out a date.


Emma Talley, Sponsor Invite and Low Amateur, +6

Q.  The leading amateur and a round of 73, what sense of achievement do you feel with that today?
EMMA TALLEY:  Yes, going into the week all I wanted to do was play well.  I don't know how the weather was going to work out for me and thankfully I had the first few days pretty good.  So it's very exciting.  Making the cut was great and now being the top amateur was even better.

Q.  These conditions, not quite what you're used to.
EMMA TALLEY:
  Not at all but I've had a little bit of experience.  I played here a couple years ago.  I was a little nervous, but I knew Georgia was up on me for sure.  Just wanted to play well, hit the middle of the greens and that's it.

Q.  It's been quite a summer for you, you holed the winning putt to win back the Curtis Cup for America and here you are as the leading U.S. Amateur here and beat the leading amateur and you had your dad on the bag today.  How special was that?
EMMA TALLEY:
  It was very special.  Last year we got to experience together winning the U.S. Am together so he's very good at caddying for me.  Keeps me calm and kind of feels like we are just playing at home for fun, which is good for me.  It's kind of funny that Georgia, we played against each other at the Curtis Cup, so it was kind of interesting to play against her again.  Didn't think we would.

Q.  What are your plans now?  Is professionalism around the corner for you?
EMMA TALLEY: 
No, I want to finish school.  I have two more years of school and hopefully after that, pro.

 

 

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Ricoh Women's British Open, Martin, Mo

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