Meijer LPGA Classic Presented by Kraft Second Round Notes and Interviews

Inbee Park
Photo Credit: Matt Sullivan/Getty Images

Inbee Park watches her second shot on the 10th hole during the second round of the Meijer LPGA Classic at Blythefield Country Club on August 8, 2014 in Belmont, Michigan.

Meijer LPGA Classic Presented by Kraft
Blythefield Country Club
Grand Rapids, Mich.
Second Round Notes and Interviews
August 8, 2014

Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 3, -10
Suzann Pettersen, Rolex Rankings No. 4, -9
Mi Rim Lee, Rolex Rankings No. 71, -8

Amy Yang, Rolex Rankings No. 15, -7
Lydia Ko, Rolex Rankings No. 2, -5
Giulia Molinaro, Rolex Rankings No. 362, -4

Rolex Rankings No. 3 Inbee Park shot her second consecutive 5-under 66 at the Meijer LPGA Classic presented by Kraft and holds a one-shot lead over Suzann Pettersen after the second round of play at 10-under-par. Known as one of the best putters on Tour, Park has a new flat stick in the bag this week and it’s been working well for the former No. 1. She has carded just one bogey in her first 36 holes at Blythefield Country Club in Belmont, Mich. But it was Pettersen who tied the round of the tournament on Friday by firing a 7-under 64 to move into solo second at 9-under-par.

NEW BLADE SAME INBEE
Despite ranking third on the LPGA Tour in putting average, Inbee Park felt that her flatstick had been holding her back this season and began experimenting with a new putter.

Park decided to pull the trigger and make the switch from a mallet to a blade for the Meijer LPGA Classic Presented by Kraft.

“At the International Crown I was trying one of my best friends, So Yeon Ryu’s, putter and when I tried it I really liked it and everything was going in so I said to the TaylorMade rep ‘can you make me one exactly the same as So Yeon’s?’ It came this week and it’s been working.”

The new putter has come into play at just the right time this week as Park has only needed 54 putts through her first two days en route to sitting at 10-under for the tournament.

“Yeah, I mean, it was two solid days; today especially because I didn’t have any bogeys,” Park said. “I had one bogey yesterday but today I had no mistakes out there. So yeah, I putted really well out there. When you’re putting really well, it’s real easy to score.”

PETTERSEN SHOOTS HER WAY UP THE LEADERBOARD WITH A COURSE-RECORD TYING 64
Suzann Pettersen was tied for 10th after her opening round of the Meijer LPGA Classic but jumped up the leaderboard into solo second after tying the course tournament record of 64 (-7).

“I played pretty good yesterday, felt like I had a lot more in the tank and had a few adjustments after I played yesterday and got off to a good start,” Pettersen said.

Pettersen got off to a hot start with back-to-back birdies en route to an outward 31, the Rolex Rankings No. 4 player kept up the solid play making three more birdies against a lone bogey to wrap up her 7-under round.

“Just eager to get playing again,” Pettersen explained. “I’ve had three weeks off and been dying to play. I’ve been playing a lot at home with my friends and buddies, but sometimes you just go out there and play and you feel like it’s wasted when you go out and play good in a like a friendly match. I guess it just shows the passion that you have for the game and the passion that you have to be out here and compete. So it’s been a nice break but I’m, like I said, very eager to get going again and have a nice fall ahead of me.”

MOLINARO FINDS HERSELF IN CONTENTION
Giulia Molinaro tied the low round of her young career with a bogey-free 67 to sit at 4-under for the
tournament.

“I started very well,” Molinaro said. “I birdied the first three holes and I had a par, and I managed to birdie my fifth hole. So that was really good that once you got three in a row, you think you’re going to stop, but I got the fourth one. Then I had good pars.”

The Italian rookie has one of the most interesting backstories in the LPGA having grown up in Kenya.

“I think I’m very, very lucky,” said Molinaro of living in the East African nation. “It was amazing. I was in the nature land. I’m a huge nature lover growing up in Kenya. My parents gave me video games and it only lasted three days. It was just not as nice playing in the nature land. I grew up right on the coast of the Indian Ocean, so I was in the ocean most of the time. On weekends we’d go on safaris, so I’d see all the animals you could possibly imagine. Very lucky. I would hope and I would love for all my friends to possibly see it or anyone that can have a chance to go to Kenya, it would be a once in a lifetime trip and I think whoever has the chance if you’re going to see that country, it’s amazing.”

Molinaro grew up in Kenya and then returned to Italy, golfing for the Italian junior nation team along the way which earned her a scholarship at Arizona State. From there, Molinaro made her way to the Symetra Tour and earned her card in 2013.

“It definitely did, you learn how to become a professional.,” Molinaro said of the Symetra Tour helping her growth as a golfer. “You’re more on your own so you grow up and you mature faster. You learn how to deal with your own self, you learn how to improve yourself, and I think it’s a great learning experience. I don’t think I’d be the player I am if I didn’t go to the Symetra Tour last year.”

MIRIM LEE ALSO TIES BLYTHEFIELD COURSE RECORD
Mirim Lee put together the round of the tournament shooting a course-record tying 64 (-7) during the second round of the Meijer LPGA Classic Presented by Kraft.

“Today irons was very good, so I had my chance,” Lee said. “Everything was good.”

The round tied the Blythefield tournament course record which is also held by Suzann Pettersen and Rickie Fowler.

MARTIN WDS
Mo Martin withdrew from the Meijer LPGA Classic Presented by Kraft prior to her second round tee time citing a thumb injury.

The RICOH Women’s British Open champion took to Twitter to express her disappointment in having to WD.

@mogarita8 - First WD ever, but going to take a few days off and rest an overuse injury. Still a great week in Grand Rapids! Thank you! @GRgyle #LPGA

WORKING FOR THE WEEKEND
71 players made the cut of 144 (+2). Notable players who missed the cut include: Jessica Korda (+3), Brittany Lang (+3), Morgan Pressel (+6) and both amateur sponsor’s exemptions - Michigan State University’s Lindsey McPherson (+7) and University of Michigan’s Grace Choi (+21).

QUOTE OF THE DAY
“I’ve been learning a lot of chipping watching Lydia chip today. She’s the chipping queen on this tour, just phenomenal to see such a great touch around the greens.”

-Suzann Pettersen on playing with Lydia Ko.

 

 

 

Inbee Park, Rolex Rankings No. 3, -10

INBEE PARK:  Yeah, I mean, it was two solid days; today especially because I didn't have any bogeys.  I had one bogey yesterday but today I had no mistakes out there.  So yeah, I putted really well out there.  When you're putting really well, it's real easy to score.

Q.  It didn't seem like the scores were going very low this morning.  Was the course playing a little more difficult?

INBEE PARK:  I think they just really watered the fairways and greens yesterday so it's playing a little bit longer than yesterday.  I played in the afternoon yesterday where it was rolling and it was firm.  It's playing a little bit shorter than this morning.  This morning I find it a little bit longer but it was a little easier to stuff the ball so I could go at the pins.  Some holes I could have been aggressive.  So yeah, I think it has ups and downs, but I'm accepting the same score so I can't really tell which day is better.

Q.  Are you making some long putts or just hitting it close?

INBEE PARK:  Yesterday I hit a lot of the shots closer but today I probably made 15‑, 20‑footers, a couple of them.

Q.  I saw you had one chip that hit the pin and you had a couple other putts that just missed.  How low could you have gone today?

INBEE PARK:  I think yesterday and today I had a lot of opportunities, I probably left maybe three per day that was really burning the edges.  I felt like I hit a perfect putt, I hit a great putt, it just didn't go in.  But there were putts I didn't exactly hit where I wanted to but it went in, so I think we're probably even.

Q.  What is it about this course that agrees with your game?

INBEE PARK:  I think you have to be accurate off the tee on this golf course.  When you're in the rough it's kind of hard to go at the pins here, so definitely keeping the ball in the fairway has been my key this week.  And I've been putting really good.

Q.  Tell me about the putter.  How long has it been in your bag?

INBEE PARK:  I just put it in this week so it's only been a couple days.  My friend was using the putter and I said can I try that, and I tried it and everything was going in.  So I asked can you make exactly the same like hers, so I just put it in.

Q.  Can you talk about some of the hole locations.  It looked like 7, the 90‑degree dogleg left up the hill, it looked like 7 position was going to be pretty tricky because of the doming on the greens.

INBEE PARK:  Yeah, I mean because that No. 7 green is very slopey green so you have to be on the right side of the hole.  When you're on the left side of the hole it gives you really fast downhill putts.  But I left myself good uphill putt from the right side, so I think you kind of have to think before you hit your second shot where to put yourself.

Q.  You put yourself in position.  What kind of work do you have now this weekend?

INBEE PARK:  I just try to set up my own numbers and just try to go like last these two days where today my goal was kind of looking at the double digits and I just got there.  Rounds like today or yesterday, next two days are going to be good.

Q.  You must be feeling really good about your game.  Is this as good as you've felt all year about your game?

INBEE PARK:  Just, you know, I hit the ball like this all year pretty much.  I hit it really good this year but I just haven't putted as well.  Putting like this feels like I'm back to last year, so hopefully I can hole some more putts the next two days.

Q.  Talk about you played in twosomes, your round was about four and a half hours.  Talk about your mindset in being patient.

INBEE PARK:  It was only four and a half hours but it felt like six hours to me because we waited on every single shot and it was kind of hard to get the rhythm going.  I guess we kind of get used to it because yesterday we kind of waited a little bit, too, and getting used to it.

Q.  Is patience a good quality for you, though, when you have to wait so long?

INBEE PARK:  Yeah, I think so.  I just try to not think about it so much and just wait.

Q.  What is it about the new putter that's different?

INBEE PARK:  I just never used that style of a putter for a long, long time and I just wanted to have a change because nothing ‑‑ I tried pretty much everything else and it didn't really work so this was pretty much my last option.

Q.  Is it a blade putter?  

INBEE PARK:  A blade putter.

Q.  And you had not used one?

INBEE PARK:  For a long time.  I think it was 2008 was the last time.

Q.  You used a mallet?

INBEE PARK:  Yeah.

Q.  Okay.  So this is kind of a big change for you.  Was it right here on this putting green where you were making them?

INBEE PARK:  Yeah.

Q.  So like Tuesday or Wednesday?

INBEE PARK:  I got them on Tuesday, yeah.

Q.  Good choice.  Do you play TaylorMade clubs in the rest of the bag?

INBEE PARK:  I use their woods, yeah.

 

Suzann Pettersen (-9) and Lydia Ko (-5)

MODERATOR:  Happy to be joined in the media center here at the Meijer LPGA Classic presented by Kraft by Suzann Pettersen on the far left and Lydia Ko to my immediate left.  Ladies, what was working for both of you out there today?  You both had great rounds.

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  You first.

LYDIA KO:  Whatever.  Yeah, you know, I wasn't hitting the ball pretty well, so I had to make an up‑and‑down a lot of times.  I mean, I was kind of struggling with my long game but luckily my chipping and short game worked really well and I think that was pretty much one of the best parts of my game today.

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  Yeah, no, played pretty good yesterday, felt like I had a lot more in the tank and had a few adjustments after I played yesterday and got off to a good start.  Just eager to get playing again.  I've had three weeks off and been dying to play.  I've been playing a lot at home with my friends and buddies, but sometimes you just go out there and play and you feel like it's wasted when you go out and play good in a like a friendly match.  I guess it just shows the passion that you have for the game and the passion that you have to be out here and compete.  So it's been a nice break but I'm, like I said, very eager to get going again and have a nice fall ahead of me.

MODERATOR:  Suzann, you definitely brought that intensity to the course today tying the course record out there.  What does that mean to you being able to go so low and bring yourself back into the hunt?

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  I think it's nice to be able to go low.  It's not like the easiest course if you miss the fairways, but just really tried to played to my strength, hit the fairways, hit greens and made a couple of putts.  I've been learning a lot of chipping watching Lydia chip today.  She's the chipping queen on this tour, just phenomenal to see such a great touch around the greens.

MODERATOR:  And both of you mentioned you had a lot of time off.  I know that Norway and New Zealand aren't in the International Crown.  What would having an event like that for your country, to represent your country mean, obviously with the Olympics coming up?

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  I mean, I don't know.  I mean, it's going to be tough for Norway event to qualify for the next Crown, but I'm glad it turned out to be a good tournament.  I've only heard great things from the players, it was well received in the media, so I'm very happy on behalf of the LPGA.  On my own behalf, I wish I was playing but there's not much we can do.

MODERATOR:  Kind of switch the question around, representing your country in the Olympics, what would that mean to both of you?

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  I mean, I think for ‑‑ it's been a dream like building in like the second part of my life that I was going to be able to compete in the Olympics, so just really trying to ‑‑ it's coming up very soon.  I mean, I remember when it first came on the program we felt like it was still so far away, but two years is going to go quick and it's going to be a lot of fun being a part of the Olympics and being inside what goes on as an athlete.

MODERATOR:  And then for you Lydia, same question.

LYDIA KO:  Yeah, you know, I've always wanted to play in the Olympics.  When they first introduced that golf might be part of the Olympics I was super excited and I worked hard to try and get to that position.  It's still two years away and a lot of things can happen from here until then, but to get to represent your country, you don't get that many opportunities.  To have that at the Olympics, that's going to be a pretty awesome event.  I mean, yeah, I want to play the International Crown but we can't really do much about it.  It's just being able to get the opportunity maybe at the Olympics, it will be pretty awesome.

MODERATOR:  We'll open it up for questions.

Q.  For both of you, starting your round in the afternoon and seeing what Inbee Park did putting up such a big number, does that play any factor in your mental attack of the round or do you ignore it, do you go after it, do you not even think about it?  Does it affect your round at all?

MODERATOR:  Start with Lydia.

LYDIA KO:  I mean, the course may have been a little easier than yesterday, but no, you can't say it's all by the course.  She must have played some pretty awesome golf to shoot that kind of a round and that's what Suzann did, too.  After seeing that score, I kind of got confidence that maybe I'll be able to shoot that kind of score.  I got off to a really good start shooting I think 4‑under on the front nine, so if I played maybe a little better on the back nine, then I could have gone close to that score, I think.

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  Yeah, it shouldn't really be a factor, but I guess you pay attention to somewhat what the morning scores are, what they've been during the morning.  But it's nice when you go out and actually can respond to it yourself.  The worst is probably to see her shoot 10‑under and then see yourself shooting 4‑over.  But it's nice when you can kind of keep up with it and keep it going. 

The course is definitely firming up in the afternoon, especially some of the greens, it's hard to hold even from the middle of the fairway even with wedges in your hand.  The first bounce is starting to ‑‑ so that's going to play a big factor into this tournament how the greens are holding and how you approach into the greens.

Q.  You mentioned making adjustments from yesterday.  What were some of the adjustments that you made?

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  I mean, it's definitely the greens have firmed up a lot.  I assume it was probably a little bit softer towards early morning, but with this heat and with no rain, the greens are only going to firm up.  It doesn't take much of a little bit of a breeze downwind, especially on 17 you're standing there with a hundred yards to the pin and you're wondering how you're going to hold the green.  It has its challenges, but it also plays to the good side.  I mean, it's nice and firm so the par 5s are reachable so it evens out.

Q.  Lydia, what were some of the things you did differently, some adjustments you made?

LYDIA KO:  I was thinking more about where to pitch it and how far to roll.  On 17 I had a pitching wedge in my hand and I would have never expected it to go that far by.  Same with No. 12, we landed in the front part of the green and we're at the back of the green.  It's kind of tough but I guess that's how the course is playing.  Maybe they'll spray some water overnight but we don't know.  I mean, everybody's playing the same course, so it's playing firm and tough for everyone.

Q.  Two‑part question; Suzann, first part for you.  Back issues, hundred percent now?  You had some problems earlier in the year.

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  No, I mean, touch wood, I've been really solid since the U.S. Open.  It was a shame that it happened when it happened, just like you can't really control when injuries happen.  I'm just very happy that I managed to kind of make a U‑turn and get back as quick as I did.  I feel no hesitation, I have no pain.  I've been functioning very normal now for, well, since the U.S. Open.  Just trying to stay on top of it being smart and just really trying to maintain a long career.  Like I say, you can't control what happens unforced, so just now I'm really enjoying the game.

Q.  We're seeing a lot of back injuries, injuries on the PGA TOUR right now with guys falling out, it's a longer season.  You guys have 33 events this year, a little longer season for you.  Do both of you see physical problems through the season, injuries becoming more and more of an issue as you add more tournaments and things go along?

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  I mean, I don't know.  I mean, this year doesn't seem to be the best for players having to stay away from the game because of injuries.  You see it on the PGA, you see it in high profile players.  This week for the PGA you've seen several of the good ones having to withdraw.  Michelle here yesterday.  It's just, I don't know.  I mean, you play a lot of golf but at the same time we all know how to pace ourselves, so I guess being healthy and being fit is a good thing. 

We do it also so we can prevent injuries, but at the same time the load can be maybe too much at times as well.  So it's a very fine balance and you've got to find your rhythm and find your way that works for you.  I don't think God made us to play golf, I don't think it's a very good sport for our body to start.  If you want to have a long career, you've got to pace it.

Q.  Off topic for today's round, but a few days ago there was the gentleman and the ladies in here doing the eye exams and I just wondered if either one of you participated in that testing and what you thought of going through all those tests and some of your outcomes?

LYDIA KO:  I obviously need to.  You can see right here I am (inaudible.)  And yeah, I mean, I kind of got to see my results and did some testing and it was really cool to have the opportunity.  It's hard to find good testing facilities where we can at the time even while doing it with golf.  I think that was a really cool opportunity and I got to know more about my eyes and how my eyes work during my stroke.  I mean, one of the ladies said that now I should be a pretty good putter by the way I was doing one of the tests, so I said okay, I'll take it.  I mean, it was really cool and it was just all different varieties of tests.  I've never seen some of them, so it was really cool that the LPGA and the people got to organize that for the players.

SUZANN PETTERSEN:  Me?  I was too afraid to do it because I'm getting old and I was afraid the answers weren't going to be what I wanted to be so I stayed away.

 


Mi Rim Lee, Rolex Rankings No. 71, -8

Q.  You've got low round for the tournament so far, 7‑under today.  You felt good out there other than your wrist?

MIRIM LEE:  Oh, yeah.

Q.  Obviously you found a lot of birdies out there today.

MIRIM LEE:  Oh, yeah.

Q.  Did you find the course playing into that a little bit?  Did you find some holes were easier than others?

MIRIM LEE:  No, no.  I just keep fairway.

Q.  Keep it in the fairway?  How was the putting on the greens?

MIRIM LEE:  Putting was so‑so, not bad.

Q.  You made about an eight‑footer.

MIRIM LEE:  Yeah, on the 18th hole.  The irons was very good, yeah.

Q.  Approach shots?

MIRIM LEE:  Yeah.

Q.  You hit it close?

MIRIM LEE:  Yeah, almost three yards, two yards.  Today irons was very good, so I had my chance.  Everything was good.

Q.  When did you really feel like you started to hit your groove there, the momentum shifted for you?

MIRIM LEE:  I'm sorry?

Q.  Can I ask this?  The course today seems to be playing a little more difficult for a lot of players.  Is it the wind?  What is it that's happening out there?

MIRIM LEE:  I think one time greens a little bit soft so not difficult today.  Wind a little bit hard.  It's okay.

Q.  You're one shot back now behind Inbee.

MIRIM LEE:  Yeah.

Q.  How do you like your position?

MIRIM LEE:  Good.

Q.  How nice is it to be in position in a weekend near the top of the leaderboard?

MIRIM LEE:  I try.

Q.  Do you feel good about second place?

MIRIM LEE:  Yeah, yeah, good.

Q.  You like your chances on the weekend?

MIRIM LEE:  Yeah.

Amy Yang, Rolex Rankings No. 15, -7

Q.  Amy, congratulations, a great 4‑under par round today, 7‑under overall for the tournament so far.  Take me through your day and what was really working for you.

AMY YANG:  You know, I started really well, 2‑under par after five holes.  Then I got a little shaky in the middle but I had three birdies the last five holes.  I'm happy with my round.

Q.  Overall in your game you played really well at the U.S. Women's Open, you were talking about how great your game was feeling then.  What's really working in your game right now?

AMY YANG:  I'm putting better.  I'm actually rolling it much better and making the putts like more than what I used to.  And also just had a new coach like a year ago and my swing is getting better.  Everything's working better.

Q.  This week you're getting ready for a major coming up next week in Rochester.  Similar golf courses, it seems, to what we're playing this week.  How much is that going to help you heading into next week's major?

AMY YANG:  You know, we play new course next week.  I don't know because I haven't been to the course, but I'm sure grass will be just like this and I really like it.  My playing is better and I think it's going to be a good week.

Q.  You had a little bit of time off coming into this event.  What do you do during your time off and how much of whatever you do do you think helps carry into this week?

AMY YANG:  I had three weeks off and first week just totally off.  I worked on my swing and a bit of everything to prepare for major next week.

 

Giulia Molinaro, Rolex Rankings No. 362, -4

MODERATOR:  Happy to be joined in the media center by Giulia Molinaro after an outstanding bogey‑free round of 67 today.  Giulia, tell us about your round today.

GIULIA MOLINARO:  Well, I started very well.  I birdied the first three holes and I had a par, and I managed to birdie my fifth hole.  So that was really good that once you got three in a row, you think you're going to stop, but I got the fourth one.  Then I had good pars, I had good birdie opportunities coming in.  I missed a few putts.  I don't know if that's the fear of knowing that I'm finally up there or something, but I just kept on going, kept on hitting very good shots, giving myself birdie chances but putts didn't drop towards the end, but I'm very happy with the bogey‑free round.

MODERATOR:  You have a pretty interesting backstory being from Italy, growing up in Kenya, making your way to the States.  Can you kind of tell the media about your background in the game?

GIULIA MOLINARO:  Sure.  I started playing when I was 12 back in Kenya on a golf course really close to home.  I played one year just with friends, nothing ‑‑ didn't think anything of it, actually really did not like the game.  I thought it was a very boring game and I didn't enjoy or didn't see like the greatness of like this game can actually offer. 

Then when I was 13 I went to see one of the Italian coaches in the city where I lived close to Venice and he thought I had potential so we started practicing with him one summer and then I got onto the National Team.  I started traveling with the Italian National Team.  That's always an amazing support.  Played all over Europe until I got recruited by Melissa Luellen at Arizona State University and had four amazing years there, learned probably the most I ever have.  I think college is a great experience.  And then I had one year on the Symetra Tour and now this is my rookie year on the LPGA.

MODERATOR:  Talk about growing up in Kenya.  What was that experience like?

GIULIA MOLINARO:  Well, I think I'm very, very lucky.  It was amazing.  I had ‑‑ it's ‑‑ I was in the nature land.  I'm a huge nature lover growing up in Kenya.  My parents gave me video games and it only lasted three days.  It was just not as nice playing in the nature land.  I grew up right on the coast of the Indian Ocean, so I was in the ocean most of the time.  On weekends we'd go on safaris, so I'd see all the animals you could possibly imagine.  Very lucky.  I would hope and I would love for all my friends to possibly see it or anyone that can have a chance to go to Kenya, it would be a once in a lifetime trip and I think whoever has the chance if you're going to see that country, it's amazing.

MODERATOR:  We'll open it up for questions.

Q.  Is it a big culture shock not being there anymore?  Obviously you travel a ton and see so many different places, but even though there's a lot of animals in the States, they're not viewable as much by the golf course.

GIULIA MOLINARO:  Culture shock, maybe not as much because I came here for two years of high school and I was in Florida.  Then back then it was ‑‑ I still do miss it.  I love when I go back home in December.  As of right now I love the States, I love it, and I want to live here and I do, I live in Arizona.  So culture shock, not as much now.  Maybe at first it was, but I don't exactly remember.

Q.  Kenya has had its troubles at times since you've been gone.  How tough is that to hear about and see what's going on there?

GIULIA MOLINARO:  It's really tough.  When I go back home I feel extremely safe.  I love it there.  Obviously I hear the news and when I talk to my parents, they're there right now, they say we don't see it, we don't hear it.  I know everything I hear happens mainly in the north of Kenya to Somalia.  We are in the south south end.  It's really sad because I think it's an amazing country, like I said, and people should go, but I understand that when you hear such thins, you don't feel safe going.  But I honestly do think that it's still an outstanding country and you should go see it.  Kenyans love tourists.  They know that tourism is one of the main incomes of the country and they love it, so I really hope it passes so people have the opportunity to go.

Q.  What do you think about the golf course in general?  You obviously had a good round today so you're probably pretty happy with it, but the condition, the style of course and that kind of thing? 

GIULIA MOLINARO:  I really like the greens and that's one of the main things I notice.  I love they way they roll.  They were a bit shocking at first when I saw how hard they received the ball, but today was much, much better, like the ball stopped more.  Obviously I guess today was just a great day.  I love the design of the trees, the rough is really good, the fairways are in great condition.  I love this style of golf course. 

MODERATOR:  You're a rookie on the Tour, you came from the Symetra Tour.  How do you feel like your experience playing there helped you for this year?

GIULIA MOLINARO:  Well, it definitely did, like you learn how to become a professional.  You're more on your own so you grow up and you mature faster.  You learn how to deal with your own self, you learn how to improve yourself, and I think it's a great learning experience.  I don't think I'd be the player I am if I didn't go to the Symetra Tour last year.

MODERATOR:  And then the rookie year, what's the transition been like for you?

GIULIA MOLINARO:  The traveling has not been a problem.  The people here are amazing, I'm loving it.  I just need to learn and today was a very good like one step forward how to deal with my own emotions on the course.  I'm playing against the best in the world so I really need to get out of my own way sometimes.  I get too expectations or I get worried, I get scared and I just need to learn to deal with my own self to like really make the next step, I think.

 

 

 

 

Topics: Notes and Interviews, Park, Inbee, Pettersen, Suzann, Ko, Lydia, Molinaro, Giulia, Meijer LPGA Classic [+]

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